Abstract




Differentiated Impact of Flipped Instruction: When Would Flipped Instruction Work or Falter?

Wenliang He
University of California, Irvine
(hewenliang@gmail.com)

Amanda Holton
University of California, Irvine
(abrindle@uci.edu)

Hengrui Gu
University of California, Irvine
()

Mark Warschauer
University of California, Irvine
()

George Farkas
University of California, Irvine
(gfarkas@uci.edu)


Abstract:
This study assessed the impact of flipped instruction on study effort, exam performance, motivation, and perceived class quality in two sections of an introductory chemistry course. Giving frequent assignments and quizzes provided enough incentive to ensure pre-class study compliance, and flipped instruction did not appreciably increase overall study time. However, technology failures early in the class show an important lesson of what can occur when a teaching modality dependent on technology is used. Unlike in our previous study, flipped students underperformed their control counterparts in the final exam. Differentiated treatment effects were identified, as sophomores and females benefited more from flipped instruction. Similar trends were also observed with student letter grades from a subsequent chemistry course. Flipped instruction did not increase student general motivation. Flipped females, however, exhibited stronger end-of-quarter motivation than flipped males. Flipped students perceived the class to be of lower quality and expressed discontent with in-class technology failures and active learning techniques. We reflect upon the resilience of the traditional lecture format and suggest that new pedagogical methods be implemented at a conservative rate to preserve student learning outcomes in the face of implementation issues.






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