International Journal of Teaching and Learning in Higher Education
IJTLHE
International Journal of Teaching and Learning in Higher Education
IJTLHE
International Journal of Teaching and Learning in Higher Education
IJTLHE
International Journal of Teaching and Learning in Higher Education
IJTLHE
2005: Volume 17 Number 2
Reviewers for Issue 17(2)
Craig Abrahamson James Madison University
James Armstrong Virginia Union University
Linda Carder Lynchburg College
Christina De Simone University of Ottawa
Lynne Hammann Mansfield University
Tony Harland University of Otago
Angela Humphrey Brown Piedmont College
Diane Janes Southern Alberta Institute of Technology
Kathleen Jones Virginia Tech
Cristy Kessler University of Hawaii- Manoa
John Lee North Carolina State University
Lin Muilenburg St. Mary's College of Maryland
Marion Palmer IADT, Dun Laoghaire
Sarah Quinton Oxford Brookes University
Debra Swoboda York College/City University of New York
Mary Timothy Appalachian State University
Erin Webster-Garrett Radford University
Sandra Zerger Hesston College

Abstract: A qualitative study of the pedagogical practices of the female faculty in a higher education program preparing college administrators revealed some of the reasons why female faculty choose their pedagogies. Surveys and interviews were used to determine what strategies faculty might have knowledge of and use in the classroom, as well as faculty members’ experiences in professional preparation programs, and their selection of instructional pedagogies. Among the influences on choice of pedagogies were perceptions of faculty and student roles in the learning experience, promotion of student learning, role of assessment, and prior educational experiences. Findings indicated that faculty did not necessarily teach in the manner in which they were taught and that faculty valued collaborative approaches and empowerment of the student in the learning process.

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2005 - Research Article
Md.Yunus, A., Hamzah, R., Ahmad Tarmizi, R., Abu, R., Md.Nor, S., Ismail, H., Wan Ali, W., Abu Bakar, K.
Views: 5483       [50]
Abstract: Problem solving abilities of college graduates have received considerable attention among employers, university professors and the public at large. Problem solving is a generic skill that needs to be acquired in ensuring success in learning and in the workplace. This study focuses on problem solving abilities of Malaysian university students from the faculties of Engineering, Science, Computer Science, Medicine, Management and Law. A total of 3025 respondents participated in this study. Samples were chosen from seven public universities and two private universities. Data were collected using the Problem Solving Skills Scale (PSSS) component of the Social Problem Solving Inventory (SPSI). The SPSI consists of two major scales, Problem Orientation Scale (POS) and Problem Solving Skills Scale (PSSS). The purpose of this study was to describe the overall problem solving abilities of Malaysian university students, with comparisons made based on year of study and fields of study. There were significant difference between problem solving abilities of (a) final year and first year students, and (b) students from different fields of study.

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As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.


2005 - Research Article
Hatzipanagos, S., Lygo-Baker, S.
Views: 8585       [52]
Abstract: Teaching observations in a Higher Education context can be underpinned by an observer’s intention to enhance learning and teaching or used as a managerial tool to ensure standards are met or maintained. In this article, we investigate whether the emphasis on the developmental value of teaching observations is misleading. We seek to examine whether the ‘educational developers as observers’ model actually provides evidence that teaching observation can be developmental and stimulate reflective practice despite the approach stemming from government initiatives towards standards-driven teaching. The conclusions provide a view of whether this has implications for fostering formative notions such as critical reflection and enhancement of teaching practice, via the developmental nature of the scheme.

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2005 - Instruction Article
Doolittle, P., Hicks, D., Triplett, C., Nichols, W., Young, C.
Views: 10014       [1]
Abstract: Assigning students the reading of historical texts, scholarly articles, popular press books, and/or Internet publications is common in higher education. Perhaps equally common is instructor disappointment in students' comprehension of assigned readings. This lack of good reading comprehension skills is exacerbated by the central role of reading comprehension in higher education success. One solution to this problem of poor reading comprehension skills is the explicit teaching of reading comprehension strategies to both undergraduate and graduate students, specifically, reciprocal teaching. In the following article the foundations and methods of reciprocal teaching are defined and then each author, in turn, delineates how he or she uses reciprocal teaching in his or her classroom. These examples demonstrate the flexibility and transferability of this basic strategy as the five authors teach in an array of domains.

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2005 - Instruction Article
Zhu, E., Wright, M.
Views: 2830       [33]
Abstract: Colleges and universities face challenges when recruiting instructional technology (IT) specialists to assist faculty with instructional development, course and curricular redesign, and teaching innovations. Lack of clear standards for IT skills and knowledge impedes the effective recruitment of IT specialists for faculty development in higher education institutions. This article discusses the work of an IT specialist, analyzes the key IT skills and knowledge from IT position descriptions, and explains a search process that the Center for Research on Learning and Teaching (CRLT) at the University of Michigan uses to recruit qualified IT specialists and faculty developers.

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As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.


2005 - Instruction Article
Meeus, W., Van Petegem, P., Van Looy, L.
Views: 2888       [27]
Abstract: The article distinguishes between four modes of implementation of portfolio in, and in relation to, higher education. These range from the use of portfolio in admissions to higher education, during the higher education course, on entry into the profession and for ongoing professional development. There is a tremendous diversity of portfolio types in use in higher education courses, which manifests itself in a large number of applications and classifications. A classification which we regard as worthy of universal acceptance is that which distinguishes between portfolios aimed at profession-specific competencies and portfolios aimed at learning competencies. In higher education portfolios aimed at profession-specific competencies yield a limited added value because they only provide supplementary information compared to other and better tools. Portfolio aimed at learning competencies adds genuine value in higher education if we want our graduates to be capable of continuing to learn on a life-long basis. The assessment of profession-specific competencies and learning competencies by means of portfolio by the same evaluator is to be strongly discouraged as it is highly prejudicial to the reliability of the reflections

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As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.


2005 - Instruction Article
Harris, M.
Views: 26834       [28]
Abstract: The instructional model presented is based upon the premise that abstracts and critiques are initial stages of scholarly writing. The pedagogy described is grounded in principles of effective lesson planning, instruction, and evaluation techniques. Step 1: Laying the Foundation describes how to teach students the difference between good term paper writing and scholarly writing. Step 2: Communicating Expectations and Evaluation Criteria presents the content and use of guidelines and rubric. Step 3: Scaffolding for Success outlines the use of journals, peer review, specific instruction, and resources. Initial students’ success and positive feedback suggest that this instructional model has merit.

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As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.


Abstract: Many undergraduate degree programs require students to develop a basic understanding of research methodology. Unfortunately, methods courses are typically unpopular with students because the course material is complex and technical in nature. Consequently, some instructors supplement traditional lecture-text classes with active learning experiences such as a student-developed research project. This paper describes a research methods course in the social sciences (psychology) based solely on multiple student-developed research projects. The paper highlights the strengths and weaknesses of this non-traditional approach to teaching research methods.

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As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.


2005 - Instruction Article
Lim, C., Coalter, T.
Views: 4057       [51]
Abstract: Most research in academic dishonesty focuses on why cheating is an epidemic in educational institutions, why students commit dishonest acts, and what can be done to curtail dishonesty in the classroom. Very little research focuses on what instructors have to endure when they charge students with academic dishonesty. This paper offers insights into actual cases of academic dishonesty, the process, the appeal, the result of each infraction, and why instructors might be reluctant to report incidents. Furthermore, this paper offers guidelines that can help prepare anyone who is serious about upholding academic integrity.

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As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.


2005 - Instruction Article
Limbach, B., Waugh, W., Duron, R.
Views: 12169       [55]
Abstract: This paper identifies a 5-step framework that can be implemented in virtually any teaching or training setting to effectively move learners toward critical thinking. This interdisciplinary model, which is built upon existing theory and best practices in cognitive development, effective learning environments, and outcomes-based assessment, provides teachers with a useful framework. This framework can be used to move students toward a more active-learning environment which, ultimately, is more enjoyable and effective for teachers and students alike. An example of the model is applied in the context of accounting education, which represents a business discipline in which critical thinking has been consistently cited as both necessary and difficult to implement.

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As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

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