International Journal of Teaching and Learning in Higher Education
IJTLHE
International Journal of Teaching and Learning in Higher Education
IJTLHE
International Journal of Teaching and Learning in Higher Education
IJTLHE
International Journal of Teaching and Learning in Higher Education
IJTLHE
2006: Volume 18 Number 1

2006 - Article
Butin, D.
Views: 3568       [117]
Abstract:

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2006 - Research Article
Aronson, K.
Views: 2818       [64]
Abstract: Prevention science, like service learning, is a relatively young field. However, in a short period of time, prevention has made significant progress in its scientific maturation, while SL research has lagged behind. Prevention science has made rapid progress because of its recognition of a multistage research cycle, reliance on interdisciplinary work, and success in developing strong university-community partnerships. Given the prevailing climate for accountability in education, SL researchers will need to increase the scientific rigor of their work. SL researchers should become more familiar with how prevention scientists conduct research. By following the lead of our prevention science colleagues and, where possible, teaming with them as interdisciplinary colleagues, SL researchers may move the field forward more rapidly.

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As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.


2006 - Research Article
Boyle-Baise, M., Brown, R., Hsu, M., Jones, D., Prakash, A., Rausch, M., Vitols, S., Wahlquist, Z.
Views: 4088       [70]
Abstract: Presently, service learning is utilized as a tool for learning about something other than service, such as: gaining civic dispositions, learning subject matter, practicing inquiry techniques, or questioning inequality. What might happen if, instead, an exploration of service itself grounded classroom studies and field work, fostering explicit consideration and critique of ethics, standards, and distinctive forms of learning through work with others? In this paper, the idea of service learning is turned on its head and "learning service" is considered as a means of enabling the civic, particularly in regard to higher education.

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As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.


Abstract: This article problemetizes the contemporary view of reciprocity and offers a philosophical foundation for an enriched view based on Dewey's critique of early stimulus-response theory in psychology and his view of democracy. We situate the argument for reconsidering the provider/recipient model of service learning in the context of a collaboration between a university and school serving children 5-9 years old while implementing an after-school tutoring program. We develop and describe the traditional and enriched models of reciprocity and create a vision for the future establishment of similar collaborations.

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As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.


Abstract: Since 1989, Cabrini College has integrated Community Service Learning (CSL) into its core curriculum. Like many early adopters of CSL, the non-traditional world of service learning has become an institutional tradition. In the past decade, CSL has widely expanded to the secondary and primary levels. However, as the CSL tradition expands, so does the use of the term "service learning". Community Based Research (CBR), once considered a "separate but equal" branch of CSL, is emerging as a more demanding pedagogy, teaching students to empower community members and alter social structures. Colleges with institutionally established CSL programs are well-prepared to take the next step into Community Based Research (CBR). They have an institutionalized knowledge of how to do CSL and have established strong community partnerships, elements essential to the success of any community-based program. For Cabrini and other early adopters, the revolution is complete. Now, evolution must take place if programming is to remain fresh, rigorous, and relevant to students and communities.

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As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.


2006 - Instruction Article
Berle, D.
Views: 3793       [65]
Abstract: Many colleges and universities have embraced service learning, but the enthusiasm of administrators often exceeds service-learning application at the classroom level. For a variety of reasons, educators hesitate to implement service learning in their courses. Understanding service learning as a pedagogical tool is the key. Both students and faculty need time to learn the strategies and practices of service learning in order to succeed. This paper discusses strategies for integrating service learning into a department-wide curriculum, using a sequence of horticulture courses as an example. By increasing the service-learning component with each successive course, teachers and students gain confidence in the method and therefore are more likely to have positive results in courses with a greater service-learning component.

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As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.


Abstract: This paper discusses Transforming Communities, a course about the interaction of public policy and community issues that includes service learning, along with other assignments designed to promote student understanding of issues critical to communities. The paper first addresses the roots and underlying principles of the Transforming Communities Program, with a focus on the Seminar. It describes how the academic content and community-based learning assignments work together to provide an interdisciplinary education about communities, with the overall objective of understanding how communities function and the means of strengthening them. It shows how the academic and experiential components of the course are incorporated into the larger picture of Transforming Communities. It concludes with a discussion of the program's accomplishments, while at the same time pointing out challenges that the course and others like it must address.

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As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.


Abstract: This article argues that the service-learning field has been pursuing the wrong revolution. Namely, service learning has been envisioned as a transformative pedagogical practice and philosophical orientation that would change the fundamental policies and practices of the academy. However, its attempted institutionalization faces substantial barriers and positions service learning in an uncomfortable double-bind that ultimately co-opts and neutralizes its agenda. This article argues that a truly transformative agenda may be to create a parallel movement to develop an "academic home" for service learning within academic "community studies" programs. This "disciplining" of service learning is the truly revolutionary potential of institutionalizing service learning.

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As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

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