International Journal of Teaching and Learning in Higher Education
IJTLHE
International Journal of Teaching and Learning in Higher Education
IJTLHE
International Journal of Teaching and Learning in Higher Education
IJTLHE
International Journal of Teaching and Learning in Higher Education
IJTLHE
2007: Volume 19 Number 2
Reviewers for Issue 19(2)
Craig Abrahamson James Madison University
James Brittain Northeastern State University
Sharon Broughton Griffith University
Susanna Calkins Northwestern University
Fredrick Chilson University of Montana Western
Peter Doolittle Virginia Tech
Mominka Fileva Davenport University
Alan Kalish The Ohio State University
Ruth Kennedy Bloomsburg University of PA
Cristy Kessler University of Hawaii- Manoa
Doris Layton Columbia College
Charlotte Hua Liu University of Canberra
Ken Martin University of Cincinnati
Catherine O'Callaghan Iona College
Carol Parker Sam Houston State University
Denise Pilato Eastern Michigan University
Jennifer Robinson Indiana University
Christine Rubie-Davies University of Auckland
Erica Smith Charles Sturt University
Susan Wilcox Queen's University
Carl Young North Carolina State University

2007 - Research Article
Bowering, M., Leggett, B., Harvey, M., Leng, H.
Views: 2888       [139]
Abstract: As the number of off-shore content-based courses presented by Western universities increases, the issue as to the suitability of elements of constructivist pedagogy arises. This paper reports on mainland Chinese student views of two different types of collaborative work conducted bilingually within a Master of Education program specializing in Educational Leadership. Despite the fact that the literature is divided on the appropriateness of such activity within Confucian-Heritage contexts, initial student evaluations voted the two group activities as the most valuable of all the course components. This encouraged the team to investigate the phenomenon by gathering both quantitative and qualitative evidence relating to the value, the organization and the contribution of individuals in each case. The extent and the nature of the generally positive responses are reported in the paper before a discussion reflecting on what the comparison of ?think, pair, share? with ?team activities? reveals for future courses. The conclusion is drawn that the study underscores confidence that group work can be very effective in such bilingual, content-based courses in China and elsewhere.

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2007 - Research Article
Donnelly, R.
Views: 6038       [167]
Abstract: This paper explores participant perceptions of the impact of a Peer Observation of Teaching scheme offered as part of an accredited Postgraduate Certificate in Teaching for academic staff and faculty members in higher education. The Postgraduate Certificate Program has been designed to support the continuing professional development of academic staff and faculty members through integration of peer learning. Inherent in the design and delivery of the Peer Observation of Teaching scheme is the belief by all involved that learning about teaching in higher education ? and heightening a sense of professionalism ? stems from a continuous process of transforming and constructing personal meaning in a variety of related ways. This program has its theoretical basis in the Experiential Learning Cycle (Kolb, 1983), and the perceived impact of the scheme has been evaluated based on this cycle; participants over the past 5 years on the program have provided valuable insights into the demands of active engagement with abstract pedagogical theory, purposeful critical refection on classroom practice, and a challenging of assumptions through shared reflective dialogues with colleagues. Of particular interest are the ways that the scheme aids the integration of theory and practice, the value of interdisciplinary learning, and the benefits for new teachers.

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As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.


2007 - Research Article
Dees, D., Ingram, A., Kovalik, C., Allen-Huffman, M., McClelland, A., Justice, L.
Views: 5763       [187]
Abstract: College teaching is a complex endeavor, which can be difficult to understand. Teacher reflection has become one means of comprehending the intricacies associated with teaching and learning. An abundant literature base examines individual elements of teaching, but looking at individual elements may encourage reflection on just a part of the process. The Teaching/Learning Transactional (T/LT) model provides a framework to guide reflection. This paper outlines the components of the model and provides a case study that represents its application. The T/LT model encourages teacher reflection that views teaching holistically. It is designed to encourage dialogue that frames teaching as a complex encounter of the human experience. Changing the language we use to discuss teaching may serve to deepen our understanding of this complex act, and in turn, improve overall practice.

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2007 - Research Article
Zhou, G., Xu, J.
Views: 1830       [206]
Abstract: Gender differences have attracted attention in today?s educational research and practice. Very few studies, however, explore the gender differences in the use of technology in higher education. The authors conducted a study on technology adoption at a large Canadian university. One of its purposes was to inform our understanding of how gender matters in the process of technology adoption in post-secondary teaching. A survey was administered to all full-time faculty and sessional instructors. Results suggest that females were more likely to use student-centered pedagogical approaches in teaching than males. Females had lower confidence and less experience in the use of computers in teaching. They tended to learn how to use technology from others, whereas males were more likely to learn from their own experience. Based on these findings, the paper recommends that professional development for females should involve more showcases and interactions while training for males would be more appropriate when it provides many hands-on activities.

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Abstract: This study investigates how learning to become a ?researching professional? (Bourner, Bowden, & Laing, 2000) is understood by students undertaking a professional Doctorate of Education in one university in the United Kingdom (U.K.). This research is apposite given the present context for doctoral education both internationally and in the U.K. However, a literature review shows this is a relatively under-explored area. The study was designed within a phenomenological and descriptive/interpretive paradigm using case study methodology. Data was collected using semi-structured interviews with 12 students. The analysis was guided by research in other disciplines within higher education which has revealed qualitatively different conceptions of student learning. In this study, three ways of understanding learning to become a ?researching professional? were identified: conformity, capability, and becoming and being. Each is characterized by an internal relationship between how the learning context, research, and professional identity are understood. Each of these ways of understanding is discussed in relation to the literature. The complexity of professional learning at the highest level for students who are ?on the cusp? between the university, the work context, and the profession is highlighted. Although no generalizations are made from this study, it may be useful to others in similar contexts as it highlights implications for university tutors regarding student learning.

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As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.


2007 - Instruction Article
Fields, J.
Views: 6746       [160]
Abstract: This paper is an examination of utilizing the J.K. Rowling Harry Potter series as a teaching tool for introductory sociology courses. Because of the ease in comparing the Wizard culture in which Harry lives with their own culture, students apply critical thinking skills and thus increase their ability to think beyond their own, immediate social systems carrying them to stages three and four, application and analysis, in Bloom?s Taxonomy. Particular strengths of the Harry Potter series are illustrations of sociological theories and social processes; examples of social stratification; and explanations of basic sociological concepts such as norms, sanctions, and deviance For this class, students are required to read the first two books or watch the movies adapted from these books. In addition, they must read the third and fourth books in the series as the movie adaptations omit significant sociological parallels. These books and movies increase abstract understanding of sociological concepts as they apply to the fictional world of wizards. These abstractions become concrete as students apply this understanding to the analysis of their own place in their social environments.

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As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.


2007 - Instruction Article
Davis, J.
Views: 2162       [195]
Abstract: Large lecture sections are a necessary and often valuable component of the college or university curriculum; however, many educators are frustrated by the impersonal nature of such classes and the potential ineffectiveness of their lecture presentations. Examining the theatrical concepts of dialogue, monologue and soliloquy provides teachers with a conceptual platform from which to evaluate their own modes of communication while also encouraging a mindset that promotes a more personal and productive environment in their classrooms.

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Abstract: Students learn in diverse ways; therefore, instructors must utilize a wide variety of instructional strategies. Students benefit when instructors use instructional strategies that promote active engagement. In-class debates cultivate the active engagement of students, yet participation in debates is often limited to students involved in debate teams. The benefits of using in-class debates as an instructional strategy also include mastery of the content and the development of critical thinking skills, empathy, and oral communication skills. Debate as an instructional strategy, however, has its opponents. Some believe debates reinforce a bias toward dualism, foster a confrontational environment that does not suit certain students, or merely reinforce a student?s existing beliefs. A variety of debate formats are described which address these criticisms including meeting-house, four-corner, fishbowl, think-pair-share, and role-play debates. Finally, issues related to the assessment of in-class debates are addressed such as whether the students are assessed individually or as a team, what aspects of the debate are assessed, and whether the instructor and/or students will do the assessment.

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As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.


2007 - Instruction Article
Hugg, R., Wurdinger, S.
Views: 2352       [210]
Abstract: This article explores the use of a new teaching and learning model that incorporates diverse progressive teaching methods to create an innovative tool for educators. The Partnership For Learning Model (PFLM), was created specifically for service learning students, community partners, and faculty with a carefully choreographed series of classroom exercises This model, along with its corresponding exercises and assignments, may be applied to a wide range of professional, academic courses that will enhance student's life skills and provide real world benefits for the communities where it is used.

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As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

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