International Journal of Teaching and Learning in Higher Education
IJTLHE
International Journal of Teaching and Learning in Higher Education
IJTLHE
International Journal of Teaching and Learning in Higher Education
IJTLHE
International Journal of Teaching and Learning in Higher Education
IJTLHE
2007: Volume 19 Number 3
Reviewers for Issue 19(3)
Sharon Broughton Griffith University
Ric Brown California State University, Sacramento
Stephen Burke Marywood University
Pete Cannell The Open University in Scotland
David Coghlan University of Dublin
Patricia Coward Canisius College
Cathlin Davis California State University, Stanislaus
Christina De Simone University of Ottawa
Denise DeGarmo Southern Illinois University
Peter Doolittle Virginia Tech
Mominka Fileva Davenport University
Anneke Fitzgerald University of Western Sydney
Dwedor Ford Winston Salem State University
Rebecca Mattern Ghabour Wilmington University
Scott Gordon University of Southern Indiana
Kathleen Gray The University of Melbourne
Iain Hay Flinders University, South Australia
Christine Hockings University of Wolverhampton
Randy Hollandsworth Piedmont College
Dennis Humphrey Premier Academic Solutions
Alan Kalish The Ohio State University
Christine Kessen Marywood University
Ian Kinchin King's College London
Christopher Klopper Griffith University
James Lane Columbia College
Yadollah Mehralizadeh University of Shahid Chamran
David Richard Moore Ohio University
Linda Naimi Purdue University
Virginia Nees-Hatlen Center for Teaching Excellence
Helena Pedrosa de Jesus University of Aveiro
Rob Phillips Murdoch University
Dev Poling Ohio University Zanesville
Sarah Quinton Oxford Brookes University
Melodie Rosenfeld Achva Academic College of Education
Maureen Schorr Quinnipiac University
Mary Timothy Appalachian State University
C. Edward Watson, Ph.D. Association of American Colleges and Universities

Abstract: Narrative inquiry was utilized to allow undergraduate students involved in an undergraduate research course to narrate their experiences in their research undertakings under the guidance of their respective mentors. A total of four focus groups representing the Bachelor of Arts and Letters, Bachelor of Commerce, Bachelor of Secondary Education, and Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy were interviewed. The present study describes the research experiences of a select group of undergraduate students who had defended their research outputs. The findings reveal that undergraduate students who were under competent, motivating, and supportive research mentors undertook the rigorous research process and experienced various activities and mixed feelings in the following stages: Groping, Developing, and Accomplishing. Only a few teams disseminated their outputs in refereed journals, educational conferences, and/or public poster exhibits.

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Abstract: The main purpose of this study was to identify, categorize and rank the future research priorities and needs for mobile learning technologies. The key research inquiries were the following: (a) What are the major research issues and challenges identified by online workers for mobile learning technologies over the next ten years?, (b) What are the major research categories identified by online workers for mobile learning technologies over the next ten years?, (c) What are the major research priorities identified by online workers for mobile learning technologies over the next ten years?, and (d) What are the major research needs identified by online workers for mobile learning technologies over the next ten years?. A Delphi study was used to represent a constructive communication device among a group of experts. A total of 72 participants (24 female and 48 male) were selected for participation. These experts identified top research issues and challenges, categories, priorities, and needs for mobile learning technologies.

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2007 - Research Article
Ozturgut, O.
Views: 3232       [230]
Abstract: Having closed its door to Western ideas for centuries, China has always presented itself as a puzzle both for academicians and politicians. Westerners, though, have always been attracted by the natural resources and human power that China offers to the capitalistic world. This study explores the entrance of Western ideas in China from an educational perspective. The researcher spent 2005-2006 in China researching a Sino-U.S. Joint venture campus, exploring the academic challenges when teaching Chinese students. While being independent learners, Chinese students maintained their cultural roots and were proud of their long historical and cultural background. Chinese students were receptive and appreciative of American education, and Western capitalistic ideas did not cause any concern among the students.

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Abstract: The present study was conducted to determine the effects of students’ perception of both teacher support and students’ reaction to questioning on the instrumental help-seeking strategy used by students. The researchers also examined the relationships between these three variables and the motivational components of achievement goal theory. A self-report questionnaire was administered to 1558 undergraduate university students, and structural equation modeling (SEM) was used to explore relations between the variables. Overall, the fit of the base model was reasonably good. Results indicate that perception of teacher reaction had a direct and positive effect on students’ instrumental help seeking, as well as indirect and positive effects on self-efficacy, and task value. Perception of teacher support had an indirect, positive effect on task value. Furthermore, results revealed that motivational components have important mediating effects on instrumental help- seeking.

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2007 - Research Article
Noonan, M., Black, R., Ballinger, R.
Views: 2506       [239]
Abstract: Mentoring has long been recognized as an effective strategy for retaining and supporting doctoral students in their programs of study. In this qualitative investigation, we conducted three focus groups of protégés, peer mentors, and faculty mentors to explore definitions, experiences, and expectations of mentoring. Results indicated that the three groups had meaningful differences in all three areas of interest. These differences were consistent with emerging conceptual frameworks explaining adult learning processes and perceived needs. The frameworks involved “stages” of mentoring and classifying the student’s preferred mentoring style along dimensions of pedagogy and andragogy. These frameworks suggest the need for clarifying protégé and mentor roles/expectations early and throughout the doctoral program.

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As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.


2007 - Research Article
Jones, J.
Views: 2115       [256]
Abstract: This qualitative research study explored the experiences of students who had attended a co-operative (co-op) education program, with a focus on what makes the experience meaningful to them. Utilizing a basic interpretive research design, students who graduated from a co-op program were interviewed using an open-ended interview protocol. Both male and female students were selected based on graduation date and came from a wide range of program types. Findings for this study were examined through the lens of connected-learning, a learning method that places emphasis on discussion, collaboration, and acceptance for knowledge development. Several themes emerged including experience, relationships, time, fees, and luck. Findings suggest that co-operative education is beneficial, but it is made meaningful by more than securing paid work terms.

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Abstract: Multiculturally congruent classroom learning environments have remained elusive in United States higher education as colleges strive to recruit, retain, and educate an increasingly diverse population. Frustrations run high amongst domestic and international students of color who find collegiate classrooms in the United States difficult to negotiate and often pedagogically incongruent with their own ways of learning and interacting. This article offers findings from a qualitative research study of four professors identified as multiculturally empowering by minority and international students in their college. Results are derived from three qualitative methods of data collection including faculty interviews, student interviews, and classroom observations. Findings suggest six elemental dynamics necessary for college professors to develop and facilitate empowering multicultural learning communities: (a) climate of safety, (b) spirit of risk taking, (c) congruence, (d) reciprocal relationships and roles, (e) multiplicity, and (f) reciprocity. Implications for teaching in cross-cultural collegiate environments are included.

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As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.


2007 - Research Article
Desrochers, M., Fink, H., Thomas, A., Kimmerling, J., Tung, W.
Views: 2659       [270]
Abstract: Alternatives to a solitary testing format can involve students working in teams to arrive at the correct answer. We compared two group assessment methods, cooperative and competitive, to a solitary testing approach. In most comparisons examining the undergraduate respondents’ (N=77) performance, the two group-testing methods were equivalent. Both group methods were superior to the solitary testing format in determining students’ knowledge of the course material and confidence in their answers. Moreover, rather than one person generating the team’s answer, most team members actively participated in the decision-making. The cooperative group surpassed the solitary testing group in terms of preference for their format of assessment.

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2007 - Instruction Article
Stefl-Mabry, J., Theroux, P., Radlick, M., Doane, W.
Views: 3110       [191]
Abstract: Collaborative problem-based courses can engage university students and faculty in more authentic, powerful, and meaningful learning experiences. For the past five years, the College of Computing and Information’s Department of Information Studies has been cultivating an educational partnership that brings together university students with their professional in-service counterparts in local K-12 school districts to explore issues of pedagogy, theory, curriculum, information literacy, technology, multimedia, and assessment. A capstone graduate course has evolved into a trans- generational learning collaboratory. The development and results of the course are discussed along with recommendations for others looking to engage in trans-generational pedagogy.

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As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.


2007 - Instruction Article
Anderson, J., Applegarth, E.
Views: 2010       [236]
Abstract: The growing fascination and popularity of robotics and artificial intelligence (AI) is observed culturally from Hollywood movies to popular magazines, comic books, and even novels. This article describes an innovative assignment created for a General Psychology course at a small pharmacy college. This assignment is based on current robotic ideology calling for the creation of a PowerPoint robot of the humanoid type that embodies the basic theories and concepts contained in a standard psychological description of a human being. Never before attempted in this course, the Robot Project is an original and innovative integration of interactive group learning, multimedia technology, and creativity used to enhance the learning of basic psychological principles.

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2007 - Instruction Article
Beacham, C., Shambaugh, N.
Views: 3254       [240]
Abstract: Designing a course requires that the teacher pays attention to both the context and the content of the course, implementing an appropriate teaching strategy to keep students interested while they learn. Advocacy provides students with opportunities to apply what they know to a compelling human need, sharpens student engagement, and situates content to be learned within a human context. Problem-based learning (PBL) provides a method to structure tasks that are engaging and relevant to students, encouraging increased learning and commitment to the task. Two cases using advocacy as a teaching strategy and learning outcome and PBL as a guide for task structure are described in terms of course design, student learning, and revisions. Successes and challenges are discussed, and guidelines for implementing advocacy as a teaching strategy are suggested in terms of course design, implementation, and revision.

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2007 - Instruction Article
Whiteside, U., Pantalone, D., Hunter, D., Eland, J., Kleiber, B., Larimer, M.
Views: 2363       [280]
Abstract: Undergraduate students attending large research universities often have the opportunity to participate in the design, conduct, analysis, and dissemination of research initiated by faculty, postdoctoral fellows, and graduate students. To date, guidelines for the conduct of this specific type of relationship – that of an academic researcher to an undergraduate research volunteer in a large team- based research laboratory – remain absent from the peer-reviewed education literature. The Boyer Commission on Educating Undergraduates in the Research University recently called for further integration and depth of experience for undergraduates into the research process. Although not impossible, in order for large research universities to respond, it is necessary to act in a strategic and well-planned manner. Included are specific suggestions for success in facilitating this relationship within the context of a large, research-oriented university department.

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2007 - Instruction Article
Zahn, G., Sandell, E., Lindsay, C.
Views: 2435       [291]
Abstract: Teacher education programs require attention to the rapid changes in the world, in part because populations are becoming increasingly diverse. These rapidly changing classroom environments have prompted a need to train teachers who can communicate with and teach students from increasingly diverse backgrounds. In addition, they must have an understanding of cultural family values and practices which influence individual students among the various ethnic populations they teach. This paper will describe steps taken by one College of Education to create international partnerships and learning experiences in an effort to enhance their teacher training programs and develop an environment of global-mindedness.

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2007 - Review Article
Levi Altstaedter, L.
Views: 5274       [398]
Abstract: Ken Bain, in his 2004 book What the Best College Teachers Do, delves into the topic of best teaching practices in college education. This review focuses on the key elements Bain identifies as those which frame the unique components that help define best teaching, which can be divided into three broad categories: knowledge about teaching, knowledge about students, and knowledge about learning. The review includes detailed descriptions of each of the three categories.

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As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

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