International Journal of Teaching and Learning in Higher Education
IJTLHE
International Journal of Teaching and Learning in Higher Education
IJTLHE
International Journal of Teaching and Learning in Higher Education
IJTLHE
International Journal of Teaching and Learning in Higher Education
IJTLHE
2011: Volume 23 Number 2
Reviewers for Issue 23(2)
Susan Appling Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing
Maria D. Avgerinou ACS Athens
C. Noel Byrd Eastern Kentucky University
Mehtap Cakan Abant Izzet Baysal University
Clare Dannenberg University of Alaska Anchorage
Denise Domizi University System of Georgia
Fernanda Duarte University of Western Sydney
Donald Finn Regent University
Christine Hockings University of Wolverhampton
Nila Ginger Hofman DePaul University
Diane Janes Southern Alberta Institute of Technology
Alan Kalish The Ohio State University
Ian Kinchin King's College London
Ernest Koh Monash University
Steven LeShay Wilmington University
Charlotte Hua Liu University of Canberra
Mary Lundeberg Michigan State University
Cortney Martin Virginia Tech
Kate McConnell American Association of Colleges and Universities
Kim Niewolny Virginia Tech
Debra Swoboda York College/City University of New York
Krista Terry Radford University
Krista Terry Appalachian State University
C. Edward Watson Association of American Colleges and Universities (AAC&U)
Joan Watson Digication
C. Edward Watson, Ph.D. Association of American Colleges and Universities
Saranne Weller University of the Arts London

Abstract: Past research has shown that informal communications among Graduate Teaching Assistants (GTAs) are more influential in shaping their teaching practices than formal induction programs. Yet little is known about how these informal helping relationships evolve and how universities can help support their formation as part of the preparation of future faculty. In this study, the supportive teaching communications of two GTAs at a large research university were examined as qualitative case studies. Social network analysis was used as a theoretical lens to construct teaching communication network diagrams based on interview data from the GTAs and their communication partners. Results indicated the importance of relationships that were multi-stranded, reciprocal, and enduring; they also indicated that “information sharing” may have provided a foundation for other types of helping behaviors. Participants discussed improving teaching as a personal rather than professional interest and described socio-emotional support as playing an important role. Based on these findings, suggestions are made about how universities can use “catalyst” events to support informal teaching communications among future faculty.

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2011 - Research Article
Foulger, T., Amrein-Beardsley, A., Toth, M.
Views: 558       [884]
Abstract: This study was instigated when 12 teacher education students expressed four concerns about their hybrid courses (part online, part face-to-face) to the college dean. In an effort gain the perspective of the broader population of students so instructors could improve this delivery method in the college, faculty-researchers sought input related to the “Dean’s Concerns” from all students enrolled in hybrid courses. A broadly distributed questionnaire revealed that attitudes towards hybrid courses were positive, but that some problems existed related to student abilities to access course content, relevance, social communications, and their instructors’ ability to use technology. Facultyresearchers were not able to determine the effect of any pedagogical changes imposed by technology on student perceptions. Researchers conclude that significant innovations in education can create growing pains for students, but these kinds of pains should be anticipated and accounted for, and that students have an important role in exposing growing pains and can support efforts to improve distance learning.

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Abstract: This paper explores practical strategies that can be used by university teachers to facilitate studentcentered, self-regulated learning. My primary objective as a university teacher is to be directly involved in my students’ efforts by connecting my teaching expertise with their self-regulated learning process. I have developed a strategic alignment model of teaching and learning, which is a practical instructional model that can be applied regardless of the academic discipline. Locating university teaching as a collaborative process of knowledge production between teachers and students, this paper presents an exploratory case wherein the teacher supports his students by providing them with a well-programmed teaching schedule. The students respond to their teacher’s efforts by showing a high level of commitment. Ultimately, this paper claims that such collaboration contributes significantly to the creation of a dynamic research culture at a university.

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Abstract: Successful college students are those who know who they are, what they want, and how to achieve their goals. In short, they are self-determined. Even though promoting self-determination has traditionally focused on K-12 students with disabilities, little is known about how higher education faculty members regard these skills. The purpose of this study was to survey faculty attitudes, knowledge, and teaching skills of self-directed learning for college students, both with and without disabilities. Results revealed significant mean differences (N = 218) across gender, departments, and academic ranks. Findings could serve as the foundation for future research on how institutional resources could be utilized to facilitate faculty in enhancing pedagogical best practices in promoting self-determination for all students before they graduate. Suggestions and implications for practice are also addressed.

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Abstract: This paper considers the experience of a small group of young adults who were born in Africa, entered Australia under the humanitarian entry program, and are enrolled in tertiary education. It investigates the expectations and experiences of these students and the associated teaching staff at a South Australian university. This body of students comprises a diverse group of individuals, and their educational success is equally varied. In focus groups many of the students revealed a range of pressures such as challenges adapting to new educational contexts, high community expectations, and difficult home environments for study. Students recounted a mixed educational experience with staff as they interfaced with practical issues of seeking academic support, accessing study materials, and studying in another language. Perhaps reflecting the determination and self-reliance that has brought them to this point, they primarily speak of academic success as their own responsibility, as well as their best support being other students from the same background. An awareness of, and a response to, these issues may help to ease refugee students’ transition to tertiary study.

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As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.


2011 - Research Article
Cox, A.
Views: 2626       [953]
Abstract: The last decade has seen a wave of new building across British universities, so that it would appear that despite the virtualization discourses around higher education, space still matters in learning. Yet studies of student experience of the physical space of the university are rather lacking. This paper explores the response of one group of students to learning spaces, including virtual ones, preferences for the location of independent study, and feelings about departmental buildings. It explores how factors such as the scale of higher education and management efficiency tend to produce rather depersonalized and regimented environments that in turn are likely to produce surface engagement. Responses of hospitality, criticality, and solidarity are briefly explored.

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2011 - Research Article
Knight-McKenna, M., Darby, A., Spingler, M., Shafer, W.
Views: 549       [954]
Abstract: Higher education faculty are drawn to academic service-learning (AS-L) for its positive outcomes. In order to achieve such outcomes, it is necessary for faculty to be intentional about students’ reflections on their AS-L experiences. This article describes research on three reflection exercises conducted with 41 students enrolled in two sections of an Educational Psychology course. Each reflection exercise was designed to help students achieve one of the following outcomes: becoming aware of negative stereotypes, making connections between their AS-L experiences and course content, or developing an appreciation for complexity in a situation at the AS-L site. Qualitative analysis was used to examine the data for patterns of the personal and academic knowledge study participants gained from each of the reflection exercises. Suggestions are included for adapting the three reflection exercises to suit the varying needs faculty have for their courses.

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As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.


2011 - Research Article
Calkins, S., Seidler, A.
Views: 802       [962]
Abstract: In this study, we analyzed a selection of extensive inquiries into teaching and learning made by faculty who were participating in a year-long, substantial faculty development program by examining the questions they raised, their rationale, their methods, and their outcomes. Specifically, we explored how these faculty members understand relevance, mapping that understanding to their goals as teachers and the kind of reflective judgment they seek to elicit in their students. As we suggest in this paper, how faculty think about relevance—in terms of why they believe their course matters, as well as what they think their students should learn, how they should develop, and the kind of reflective judgment-making they expect to see in their students—may have significant implications for how these faculty think about teaching and, consequently, how they teach.

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As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.


Abstract: This article describes the process of faculty-led development of a student evaluation of teaching instrument at Centurion School of Rural Enterprise Management, a management institute in India. The instrument was to focus on teacher behaviors that students get an opportunity to observe. Teachers and students jointly contributed a number of desirable and undesirable performance examples that went through a process of filtration using mean-difference item response analysis and factor analysis. The final instrument has 18 examples to be rated on a six-point scale. It was used with a formative focus; however, the post-implementation experiences indicated the need for limited summative focus as well. New students need to be educated about student evaluation of teaching and its relevance for a quality academic life. It also emphasizes the need for open communication and a climate of trust for a successful student evaluation of teaching.

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2011 - Research Article
Fergie, G., Beeke, S., Colleen, M., Phyllis, C.
Views: 636       [1016]
Abstract: Traditional views of the writing process as a solitary and painstaking task can inhibit postgraduate students from pursuing useful conversations about their writing. Recent research has suggested that spaces for opening discussion on writing are needed and are important in supporting postgraduate writers to develop their academic identity (Cuthbert & Spark, 2008; Cuthbert, Spark & Burke 2009; Kamler & Thomson, 2007; Lee & Boud, 2003). This paper explores the experiences of five students at University College London (UCL), who were the first cohort to take a writing module which aimed to introduce theoretical and practical approaches to writing and to encourage reflection and evaluation of writing practices. The three key themes to emerge from the research were related to the development of the students’ confidence as writers and more generally as researchers. These were: (1) Space – the value of having a defined space for writing, providing a new focus for learning in a less formal environment; (2) Academic Identity – the development of the students’ academic identity through writing and gaining confidence as writers; and (3) Peer Learning – the importance of discussion with peers in developing writing and academic identity.

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As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.


2011 - Instruction Article
Duncan, T., Buskirk-Cohen, A.
Views: 872       [977]
Abstract: Frustrated by students' disappointing performance on traditional exams, an education professor and a psychology professor independently asked their students to simply demonstrate what they had learned during a given time frame. In this article, we will argue that when students are provided opportunities for learner-centered assessment, they dedicate more time, show more creative output, and are often more successful than when answering questions on a traditional assessment measure. Research has demonstrated that students who create their own assessment must show that they understand the information by re-interpreting it in a different way, the very definition of deep learning (Atherton, 2005; Saljo, 1979). When instructors require that students really think about what and how they have learned, they are encouraging further learning to occur (Bransford, Brown, & Cocking, 2000). Sample methods of learner-centered assessment with rubrics are provided, as well as suggestions for implementation and improvement.

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Abstract: Teaching ethical reasoning is considered an important component of the undergraduate learning experience. A recent approach to teaching using experiential learning is through virtual worlds such as Second Life. We discuss how ethics may be taught using experiential learning in the virtual world of Second Life. Participants in the class in this example were eleven undergraduate honors students. The course involved presentations in ethical theories such as Buddhism and Utilitarianism. Students completed assignments based on experiences in Second Life that were then linked to ethical theories discussed. The observations and analyses they completed demonstrated that the experiential learnings provided opportunities to apply concepts and theories in a virtual and real world. Interestingly, the students found evidence of residents of the virtual world of Second Life to hold ethical principles which influenced their actions. However, there were other instances where residents adhered to few ethical principles other than self interest. Suggestions are made about the importance of introducing ethics to a virtual world such as Second Life.

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Abstract: Using the example of student-generated midterm exams produced during a university classroom exercise, this narrative account examines student-centered pedagogy from both the university faculty and student perspectives. The central question revolved around how to actively engage a community of diverse university students from different academic, social and ethnic backgrounds in working as partners to co-construct knowledge in a pre-service teacher course. Applying a student-centered pedagogy informed by social constructivism, the authors reflect on how the student-generated midterm exams challenged the participants to think about their approach to learning. Through this experience, students were provided with multiple entry points to access the curriculum and were empowered as active agents of their own learning, while the instructor found an interactive arena for reflection on her own pedagogical practices in action. The authors propose a change from the traditional teacher-centered lecture style to a higher education pedagogy that places students in control of their own scholarship.

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