International Journal of Teaching and Learning in Higher Education
IJTLHE
International Journal of Teaching and Learning in Higher Education
IJTLHE
International Journal of Teaching and Learning in Higher Education
IJTLHE
International Journal of Teaching and Learning in Higher Education
IJTLHE
2012: Volume 24 Number 2
Reviewers for Issue 24(2)
Craig Abrahamson James Madison University
Bob Bradley Tennessee State University
Lauren Bryant North Carolina State University
Susan Clark Virginia Tech
Mieke Clement Katholieke Universiteit Leuven
David Coghlan University of Dublin
Clare Dannenberg University of Alaska Anchorage
Giuliana Dettori ITD-CNR (Institute for Educational Technology)
Gulsun EBY Anadolu University, College of Open Education
Martha Gabriel University of Prince Edward Island
Rebecca Mattern Ghabour Wilmington University
Lynne Hammann Mansfield University
Charles Hodges Georgia Southern University
Diane Janes Southern Alberta Institute of Technology
Robin Kay UOIT
Anastasia Kitsantas George Mason University
Christopher Klopper Griffith University
Olabisi Kuboni University of the West Indies Open Campus
Rita Kumar University of Cincinnati
Cortney Martin Virginia Tech
Jennifer McCloud Virginia Tech
Marina Micari Northwestern University
Diane Nauffal Lebanese American University
Kim Niewolny Virginia Tech
Gwen Ogle ID & E Solutions, Inc.
Kelly Parkes Virginia Tech
Ralph Preszler New Mexico State University
Godfrey Steele The University of the West Indies
Laura Sujo-Montes Northern Arizona University
Krista Terry Appalachian State University
Siew Ming Thang The National University of Malaysia
Joan Watson Digication
Saranne Weller University of the Arts London

Abstract: There was a concern from faculty at Bahrain Teachers’ College that undergraduate Bahraini students lack the necessary competencies needed for success in educational contexts that are conducive to active, student-centered learning. It was decided that the students be introduced to a problem-based learning (PBL) strategy in one of their educational psychology courses to encourage more active learning on their part. PBL is a strategy through which students learn course content by analyzing and solving real-life problems related to the course, and in Bahrain it is a strategy that is seldom, if at all, applied in classroom contexts other than those of the medical sciences. In this sense, the current study was somewhat unique and it focused on exploring the effects of, and the students’ reactions, to PBL. In it, observation, monitoring of students’ performance, and students’ personal reflections and group presentations were utilized as the main assessment instruments. Results indicated a high satisfaction rate with PBL, as well as improved learning outcomes in the educational psychology classroom, with the development of competencies that are more in line with what is needed for solid professional teaching practice. The results also suggested interesting implications related to teacher preparatory colleges and educational reform.

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2012 - Research Article
Gurung, R., Landrum, R.
Views: 614       [1183]
Abstract: Faculty perceptions of textbook quality, anecdotal posts to listservs, and published ratings frequently determine textbook choice. Although faculty members intend to have students use the textbooks, few published empirical studies assess student opinions. In two studies, students rated widely adopted introductory psychology textbooks on eight categories ranging from visual aids to writing quality. Results showed little inter-textbook differences; however, students indicated clear preferences. We found different patterns in preferences for visual material (e.g., photographs) versus written material (e.g., examples), but no differences in the ratings of tables and in the use of research examples. Students clearly differentiate between textbooks, but textbook ratings did not relate to quiz scores on text material.

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Abstract: Advances in technology are having a profound impact on distance education as online learning is becoming a preferred educational option. Within these online learning experiences, the asynchronous online discussion has evolved into one of the most commonly used communication tools. However, a lack of cognitive processing and interaction in the discussions appears to limit the potential benefits as suggested within social constructivist theories. This research analyzed participant responses and postings in online discussions and identified seven stances relative to collaboration and cognitive engagement of participants. A taxonomy was created that allows categorization of participant stances with respect to the two constructs. Implications for teaching and research are presented with attention to facilitative prompts, which are used to enhance collaboration and participation within online discussions.

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Abstract: This case study of an American professor’s teaching experience in Sweden analyzes classroom communication using relational dialectics theory and cultural values theory. Tensions of hierarchy vs. equality and autonomy vs. connection were described through classroom processes such as greeting practices, dress, grading, attendance, gendered language use, and participation. Three Swedish values served as partial explanation for the communication processes described in this essay: folkhemmet (i.e., “the good home”), lagom (i.e., “moderation”), and ensamhet (i.e., “solitude”). Results of this interpretive research suggest that professors preparing for teaching abroad would benefit from the use of relational theories, cultural values, and metaphors to assist in competent professional interaction and successful learning outcomes.

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Abstract: While research into the effectiveness of teaching professional development for postsecondary educators has increased over the last 40 years, little is known about science faculty members’ teaching professional development needs and their perceptions regarding what constitutes meaningful teaching professional development. Informed by an extensive review of the literature and numerous research projects involving hundreds of faculty members in the sciences from multiple universities, this paper seeks to help science faculty members assess their own teaching professional development needs as well as to seek out meaningful and effective teaching professional development activities to help meet their needs.

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Abstract: This 14-week qualitative study investigated the use of exit slips in two literacy courses in the college of education at a public university in the Midwest of the United States. A group of 44 undergraduate and graduate students participated. These students included pre-service teachers who are developing their understanding of what counts as effective literacy practice and in-service teachers who are interested in improving their existing practices. The main focus of this study was to examine how exit slips supported students in two teacher education courses. Data included 608 exit slips and student feedback shared in class about exit slip use. This paper reports on how exit slip writing during class encouraged reflective thinking about teaching as a profession. Specifically, this paper examines eight different reflections students made that point to growth in content knowledge and a sense of self as practitioner and learner. It is contended that exit slips can help students identify, develop, and articulate their beliefs about teaching and learning, resulting in giving pre-service and practicing teachers an edge in improving their curricular practices. It is also contended that the positive effect of exit slips points to uses in higher education classrooms in general.

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Abstract: The objective of the present study was to examine how motivation is related to academic achievement. The Motivated Strategies for Learning Questionnaire (MSLQ) was administered to 1,166 students at a polytechnic in Singapore as a measure for motivational beliefs and self-regulated learning strategies. In addition, students’ prior knowledge, achievement-related classroom behaviors, and academic achievement were included in the analysis. Path analysis revealed that motivation is not directly related to achievement. Instead, the relationship was mediated by both learning strategies and achievement-related classroom behaviors. Prior achievement was a good predictor of subsequent achievement but had no influence on student motivation. Overall, the results suggest that motivation as operationalized by self-report seems to be a construct with limited predictive validity for academic achievement.

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Abstract: The concept of the independent learner has become increasingly important within the higher education sector. However, there appears to be no consensus and rarely any clarification of what is meant by the term. As a result, students may fail to understand what is expected of them as independent learners, with implications for retention, progression and the student experience. This paper describes a research project that aimed to clarify what students and staff understood by the phrase. The results suggest that while most staff and students were familiar and comfortable with the concept, there remains potential for misunderstanding and confusion.

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2012 - Research Article
Nicholas, T., Baker-Sennett, J., Harwood, A., McClanahan, L.
Views: 433       [1250]
Abstract: This study describes how a community-based interprofessional education approach designed to engage preservice teachers with community members and human services professionals contributes to preservice teachers’ inquiry skills and their understanding of interprofessional collaboration. Preservice teachers were enrolled in a research methods course where they conducted inquiry projects in collaboration with a non-profit organization and neighborhood associations. They reported learning about the process of doing inquiry, gaining an understanding of collaboration, and increasing their understanding of community issues, as well as how the context of communities might shape their future students’ needs. The authors consider how these outcomes contribute to helping preservice teachers develop skills and knowledge indicated by professional teaching standards.

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Abstract: This study examined the socialization and preparation of future education faculty by exploring narratives of 17 doctoral student-instructors at a large, public, research-oriented university. Data were collected in semi-structured interviews followed by member checks to verify and clarify understandings and interpretations. Participants’ experiences were analyzed in a three dimensional inquiry space to identify both common and divergent narrative themes. Findings underscore the importance of faculty mentorship and highlight participants’ changing expectations and career goals. Implications emphasize individual and collaborative opportunities for improvement by multiple stakeholders in the doctoral education enterprise, including recommendations for both short and long term curricular practices.

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2012 - Instruction Article
Xu, Y., Patmor, G.
Views: 466       [1199]
Abstract: Teacher leadership is about empowering teachers to take a more active role in school improvement. Current pathways to teacher leadership, namely the Teacher Leader Master (TLM) degree program and teacher-led professional development, mainly target in-service teachers. Less attention has been paid to teacher leadership training in current teacher preparation curricula. This article describes three instructional strategies for nurturing pre-service teachers’ leadership skills in a teacher preparation program. The three strategies are (1) to encourage cross-domain and multiple perspective-taking among pre-service teachers; (2) to enhance pre-service teachers’ ethical reasoning; and (3) to engage pre-service teachers in analyzing real-life teacher leadership cases. The specific strategies presented in this article can be used as examples for teacher preparation programs as they strengthen their efforts in leadership training for pre-service teachers.

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Abstract: This paper introduces creative pedagogical techniques for exploring theory in the undergraduate classroom. Using criminal justice and criminological theories as a primary example, it describes a technique that professors from any theory-driven discipline can use to engage students through popular music, from hip-hop to musical theater in order to strengthen their grasp of the basic theoretical foundations of their field. By introducing music as a forum for understanding theory, we can both peak the interest of our students and demonstrate to them that theory is present in our everyday lives. Here we will consider the importance of integrating popular culture and technology in our classrooms, the ways pop music espouses the major assumptions of theory, and creative approaches we can use to make criminal justice, criminology, and other theory-driven disciplines even more exciting to our students.

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Abstract: Increasingly, many of our higher education teaching staff hail from diverse backgrounds with cultures that are often dissimilar to the world of academia. Drawn to education as a second career, or courted from industry for real world verisimilitude, their experience and external sector knowledge can be invaluable to an institution, but of little practical assistance to the individual in front of his or her first lecture theatre. Between 2008 and 2010, staff developers from five New Zealand higher education providers used an action research framework to investigate and address the needs of these novice teachers. This paper uses the four-phase cycle of planning, acting, observing and reflecting to describe the development and evaluation of Signposts, a professional development resource for new post-secondary educators. Learnings from the project affirm the value of collaborative projects and underscore the need for educational leaders to model reflective and critical practice. Several identified aspects of good practice in resource development are transferable beyond the single action research cycle described here.

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2012 - Instruction Article
Ekmekci, O., Hancock, A., Swayze, S.
Views: 603       [1210]
Abstract: This paper examines the challenge of teaching statistical research methods in three master’s degree programs at a private university based in Washington, DC. We, as three professors teaching at this university, discuss the way we employ innovative approaches to deal with this challenge. We ground our discussion within the theoretical framework of problem-based learning and adult learning principles. We provide brief descriptions of our research methods courses to demonstrate how an instructor can facilitate learning of new knowledge and applications in a content area often considered intimidating by students. We also highlight similarities across the three different courses we teach and pose several key questions that might help guide instructors inspired to engage students in the vital practice of using research in professional practice.

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Abstract: Drawing on a theoretical framework based on “use-inspired” applied research and service learning practice (Honnet-Porter & Poulsen, 1989), this paper argues the relationship between a service- learning approach and Public Relations coursework is a natural and highly desirable fit. Through examination of the goals of both service-learning and public relations curricula, the instructional implications of service learning in Public Relations coursework are explored, with emphasis placed on published standards for good practice. Examples from the authors’ own course experiences in promoting service learning are also offered along with specific suggestions for motivating and preparing both students and faculty for a service-learning-enhanced Public Relations curriculum.

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