International Journal of Teaching and Learning in Higher Education
IJTLHE
International Journal of Teaching and Learning in Higher Education
IJTLHE
International Journal of Teaching and Learning in Higher Education
IJTLHE
International Journal of Teaching and Learning in Higher Education
IJTLHE
2016: Volume 28 Number 2
Reviewers for Issue 28(2)
Norris Armstrong University of Georgia
Pete Cannell The Open University in Scotland
Mary Carney University of North Georgia
Susan Clark Virginia Tech
David Coghlan University of Dublin
Kristina Collins Texas State University
Leslie Cramblet Alvarez University of Denver
Clare Dannenberg University of Alaska Anchorage
Elizabeth Davis University of Georgia
Denise DeGarmo Southern Illinois University
Gulsun EBY Anadolu University, College of Open Education
Anna-May Edwards-Henry The University of the West Indies
Susan Epps East Tennessee State University
Cara Gormally Gallaudet University
Barbara Grossman University of Georgia
Thomas Chase Hagood University of Georgia
Linda Harklau University of Georgia
Brian Higgins University of Kentucky College of Medicine
Mary Hill The University of Auckland
Nila Ginger Hofman DePaul University
Lenore Kinne Northern Kentucky University
Tanya Kunberger Florida Gulf Coast University
Jacquelyn Lee University of North Carolina Wilmington
Kate McConnell American Association of Colleges and Universities
Diann Moorman University of Georgia
Kim Niewolny Virginia Tech
Ralph Preszler New Mexico State University
Lisa Rohde University of Nebraska - Lincoln
Laura Saret Oakton Community College
John Schramski University of Georgia
Laura Sujo-Montes Northern Arizona University
Connie M. Tang Stockton University
Jennifer Wong Emory University
Sarah Zenti University of Georgia

Abstract: This study evaluates whether students who participate voluntarily in a service-learning activity achieve higher learning outcomes, measured by grades, than students who voluntarily choose not to participate in service learning. Analysis is based on a study of an introductory urban studies course at a large North American research university over a four-year period. Findings indicate that, overall, students achieve higher grades as a result of participation in service learning, and additionally that females, international students, and students who are enrolled in either the Urban Studies minor program or who are non-Urban Studies students benefit most from optional participation in service learning in terms of grade achievement.

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2016 - Research Article
Behar-Horenstein, L., Isaac, N., Southwell, C., Hudson-Vassell, M., Niu, L., Pratto, M., Roberts, K., Wingfield, R., Wolfgang, J., Zafar, M.
Views: 462       [2149]
Abstract: This study explores the narratives of eight students who served as journal reviewers on a non-course-related service activity. The aim of this study was to develop an understanding of their experiences. The review board was multi-disciplinary in composition; the majority of its student and faculty members were from communities historically excluded from, and marginalized within, structures of U.S. higher education. Student engagement in learning how to manage an online journal fostered academic socialization through collaboration and collective learning. Students' perceptions of the benefits of working on the journal were categorized across five themes: Academic Career Enhancement, Practicing Faculty Work, Illuminating Faculty Roles, Demystifying Writing for Publication, and Grappling with Prioritization. The benefits and challenges of promoting academic socialization through service learning and mentorship, as well as showing how service engagement can be integrated in academic and personal identities, are discussed.

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Abstract: This article provides an evaluation of the redesign of a research methods course intended to enhance students’ learning for understanding and transfer. Drawing on principles of formative assessment from the existing academic literature, the instructor introduced a number of increasingly complex low-stakes assignments for students to complete prior to submitting their final project. Concrete, constructive feedback from either the instructor or peers or both was offered at each stage of the project so that students could have the opportunity to review their work and improve particular aspects prior to moving on to the next assignment. Student performance on each subsequent submission was assessed through the use of a scoring rubric. Although there was significant improvement from one draft of a given assignment (T1) to the next (T2), the instructor’s decision not to require a preliminary draft of the final project ultimately yielded mixed results at the end of the course (T3); this serves to highlight the importance of providing multiple active learning opportunities for students by using a progressive scaffolding approach.

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Abstract: Becoming a teacher involves a continual process of identity development and negotiation. Expectations and norms for particular pedagogies impact and inform this development. In inquiry-based classes, instructors are expected to act as learning facilitators rather than information providers. For novice inquiry instructors, developing a teacher identity may be fraught with contradictions. Inquiry-based learning approaches have been widely adopted in university biology laboratory courses. Teaching assistants (TAs) teach the majority of these labs. Despite TAs’ importance in university science instruction, we know little about their teacher identity development. This study analyzes interviews and written reflections to explore how teaching science as inquiry figures into TAs’ teacher identity formation. Through five case studies, the study characterizes the trajectories of TAs who made or did not make inquiry teaching practices their own. Most TAs made progress toward developing an inquiry-oriented teacher identity by shifting their focus to student learning. These TAs came to see their students as doing science rather than simply participating in a lab class. Findings also highlight beliefs that conflict with inquiry practices in order to inform strategies to support TAs' changing conceptions about science teaching and the development of inquiry teacher identities.

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As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.


2016 - Research Article
Abdelmalak, M.
Views: 386       [2230]
Abstract: The purpose of the current comparative multiple-case study was to understand graduate students’ perceptions of the collaborative construction of course assignments. Data were gathered from the graduate student interviews, class observations, and relevant student artifacts. With this collected data, six case studies were generated. The study revealed that being able to design assignments based on student perceived goals gave these participants a sense of control over their own learning. This in turn encouraged them to take responsibility for their own learning and motivated their involvement. However, some participants expressed that their previous experiences of being dependent on teachers to make decisions for them made it difficult to be fully involved in the assessment process. The current study also claims that student lack of self-confidence in their knowledge and power relations between students hindered some participants from giving feedback to their peers on the assignments. The study draws attentions to the need for a partnership between faculty and graduate students in assessment. In such partnership, the instructor and students jointly own assessment.

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As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.


2016 - Research Article
Grossman, G., Richards, T.
Views: 435       [2238]
Abstract: We evaluated students’ perceptions and reactions to an active learning Karaoke Video project in both a large (104 student) undergraduate class in Natural History of Georgia and a small graduate seminar in Fish Ecology. Undergraduate responses were evaluated with both questionnaires and triangulation interviews and graduate student responses evaluated with interviews alone. There was a slight majority of first and second year students (64%) in the undergraduate class. Students’ majors/proposed majors were dominated by non-science categories, with 76% reporting non-science and 11% reporting science (13% no response). The overwhelming response of students to the 10 question Karaoke Video project questionnaire was positive (p << 0.0001), and 83% responded that the project aided in learning class material. Triangulation interview responses from undergraduate students supported questionnaire results, and graduate students also generally perceived the exercise as positive. Our results indicate that both undergraduate and graduate students responded positively to the Karaoke Video project and that these responses did not vary over several potential inter-student biases. This project was completed with the approval of the Institutional Review Board of the University of Georgia.

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As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.


Abstract: In this study, six African American female college students were interviewed to explore perceptions about their college learning environment and the beliefs they have about their own competence and value with regard to others in the college community. Focus group and individual interviews were conducted over the course of the academic year to examine insights about classroom dynamics and peer interactions. Findings revealed that their decision to persist at the college was based on faculty being accessible, approachable, and providing authentic instruction. While this was encouraging, undergraduate women of color still described challenges such as experiencing microaggressions from professors and classmates and feeling a need to “represent their race” when asked to provide commentary on specific course topics. The results show that African American college women have experiences that are unique and faculty must be aware of the need to create a safe space in which these students can engage and participate fully.

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As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.


2016 - Research Article
Islim, O., Gurel Koybasi, N., Cagiltay, K.
Views: 1402       [2245]
Abstract: Open Educational Resources (OER) and OpenCourseWare (OCW) target barriers of education and learning by sharing knowledge for free to benefit self-learners, educators, and students. This study aims to investigate the use of OER both as a supplementary resource for a traditional course and as a resource for self-learners. First, the attitudes and perceptions of undergraduate students toward using a General Physics Laboratory OER and about how those resources contributed to the outcomes of the course were determined. Second, public usage of resources was assessed by analyzing OER access statistics. Resources were designed to encourage students to review experiments before laboratory sessions. Results indicated that students who used the OER experienced benefits to their learning processes. In line with their aim, the resources facilitated preparedness for the course. More than half of the respondents deemed supplementary resources unnecessary. On the other hand, self-motivated learners found, reviewed, and benefited from the resources.

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As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.


2016 - Instruction Article
Pretorius, L., Ford, A.
Views: 746       [2142]
Abstract: Reflective practice is a key skill in many professions and is considered an essential attribute of healthcare practitioners. Healthcare students are often expected to develop reflection skills through their assignments, and this is frequently expected to occur with little explicit instruction, practice or guidance about how to reflect. Currently, there is limited guidance in the literature on how teachers can help students develop these reflective skills effectively. In this study, we describe a process for embedding reflective skills into a transition program for new healthcare students about to enter university. By allowing students to explore reflection through a method of self-discovery supported by peer discussion, we found that students were likely to recognize and value reflection as a learning tool (a concept we term “reflection for learning”). Additionally, these students were more likely to continue to practice reflection in their studies than students who had not participated in the training. In summary, this paper demonstrates that students are able to make meaningful deductions about reflective practice and their own learning through use of a basic framework in which to self-reflect, from the very start of their tertiary studies.

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As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.


Abstract: This article aims to address the practical question of whether there is educational value to embedding second-language (L2) learning experiences in intergenerational contexts. In particular, a case study was conducted of a novel, university-based ESL program in Hong Kong in which a group of older adult volunteers with a high level of English language proficiency skills engaged a group of college students with beginner to mid-level English language skills for an intensive three-month period of English language instruction, language practice, and intergenerational relationship building activities. The intergenerational context was reflected in the curricular activities designed to stimulate intergenerational (teacher-learner) sharing of real-life interests, stories, experiences, and perspectives. According to data from open-ended questions and IELTS-based English proficiency tests, the college students exhibited improved ESL skills and enhanced motivation to practice and extend their learning, while the older adult volunteers earned a valued teaching credential, improved their teaching abilities, and gained confidence and motivation for expanding their social linkages in the community. Implications for framing intergenerational encounters in ways that enhance meaningful ESL learning in real world contexts are considered.

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As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.


Abstract: Caring is often cited as the central component of many health care professions. It is also identified as an equally important factor in patient physical and emotional recovery. In examining health care education, however, curriculum is becoming increasingly focused on the development of technical competence and skill with little focus on the affective aspects of providing care in a caring context. In the field of occupational therapy, little is written regarding facilitation of caring behaviors in occupational therapy students. Through examination of the educational philosophies of Paulo Freire and Nel Noddings, a framework for a caring curriculum can be developed. Through use of signature pedagogies in occupational therapy, the author utilizes fundamental aspects of a caring curriculum put forth by Freire and Noddings to develop a curriculum that not only develops the individual’s technical skill, but makes them emotionally competent as well. Though the work of Freire and Noddings was not explicitly intended for higher learning or health care professional education, the principles put forth are not only relevant but provide a viable framework for the development of caring professionals. The benefit of this proposal will ultimately be to patients whom these emotionally competent occupational therapists serve.

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As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.


Abstract: Success in college requires the development of self-regulated learning strategies that move beyond high school skills. First-year students of all ability levels benefit when given instruction in how to use these strategies in an authentic context. This paper presents an instructional method that requires deliberate practice of self-regulated learning strategies including active reading, management of study time and achievement goals, proactive interaction with faculty, and metacognitive reflection within the context of a student-selected course. Four instructors implemented the assignment in their first-year seminar courses, and student reflection papers were analyzed for emerging themes. These themes suggest the positive impact of applying pedagogy that requires intentional within-course application of self-regulated learning strategies, suggesting the strategy project may be a viable way to teach and encourage college-level strategic behavior.

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As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.


2016 - Instruction Article
Cheng, E.
Views: 507       [2219]
Abstract: The variation theory stems from the concept of phenomenography. Although some applications of the theory can be found, the theory is not well known in the field of education, especially with respect to the teaching of business and management subjects. The aim of this paper is to explore the use of the variation theory for teaching management concepts. A case of designing an educational setting for learning two easily confused theories of knowledge management was presented. With the intended object of learning, the educational setting was divided into three parts, based on which students experienced the four patterns of variation (i.e., contrast, separation, generalization, and fusion) by using their own generated examples. The theory helps students draw upon their personal experiences and discern learning from different perspectives.

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As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.


2016 - Instruction Article
De Pedro , K., Jackson , C., Campbell, E., Gilley, J., Ciarelli , B.
Views: 369       [2223]
Abstract: The Lawrence King murder and other tragedies surrounding transgender youth have prompted a national discussion about the need for schools to be more supportive and inclusive of transgender students. In this multi-authored reflection, the authors describe a series of three introductory activities in an undergraduate educational studies course aimed at cultivating critical consciousness about transgender students. The instructor and students discussed their viewing of televised interviews featuring transgender individuals and participated in a gallery walk and a role-playing activity. These activities cultivated students’ critical awareness of the experiences of transgender students and strategies for creating trans- inclusive classrooms and schools.

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As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

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