International Journal of Teaching and Learning in Higher Education
IJTLHE
International Journal of Teaching and Learning in Higher Education
IJTLHE
International Journal of Teaching and Learning in Higher Education
IJTLHE
International Journal of Teaching and Learning in Higher Education
IJTLHE
2018: Volume 30 Number 1
Reviewers for Issue 30(1)
Ali A. Abdi University of British Columbia
Gayle Brazeau University of New England
Robert Carpenter Eastern Michigan University
Sarah Marie Catalana Winthrop University
Susan Clark Virginia Tech
Erin Colbert-White University of Puget Sound
Leslie Cramblet Alvarez University of Denver
Clare Dannenberg University of Alaska Anchorage
Elizabeth Davis University of Georgia
Denise DeGarmo Southern Illinois University
Anna-May Edwards-Henry The University of the West Indies
Mark Fink Retired
Donald Finn Regent University
William Flora East Tennessee State University
Teresa Foulger Arizona State University
Adam Friedman Wake Forest University
Rebecca Mattern Ghabour Wilmington University
Lilia Gomez-Lanier University of Georgia
Carol Greene East Carolina University
Mary Hill The University of Auckland
Randy Hollandsworth Piedmont College
Angela Jaap Royal Conservatoire of Scotland
Kathleen Jones Virginia Tech
Marianne Justus University of Phoenix
Alan Knowles MacEwan University
Rita Kumar University of Cincinnati
Laura Levi Altstaedter East Carolina University
Lindsay Masland Appalachian State University
Michael McEwan University of Glasgow
Marina Micari Northwestern University
Diane Nauffal Lebanese American University
Muiris O Laoire Institute of Technology
Debbie Phillips University of Georgia
Lisa Rohde University of Nebraska - Lincoln
Laura Saret Oakton Community College
Rhoda Scherman Auckland University of Technology
John Schramski University of Georgia
Kevin Sellers Unafiliated
Penny Silvers Dominican University
Brian Stone Boise State University
Kenneth Tyler University of Kentucky
Sylvia Valentin Niagara University
C. Edward Watson Association of American Colleges and Universities (AAC&U)
Michele M. Welkener The University of Dayton
Jesse Wilkins Virginia Tech
Norhasni Zainal Abiddin Universiti Putra Malaysia
Anne Marie Zimeri University of Georgia

Abstract: This study involves the design of an online course on oral corrective feedback (ONOCEF) and its implementation through flipped classroom with a view to finding out if it exerts any impact on ELT student teachers' competencies regarding oral corrective feedback (OCF). Having conducted a needs analysis, the ONOCEF was developed and then administered to thirty ELT student teachers by flipping the classroom. In this flipped model, first, the students took the ONOCEF input outside the school. Then they enacted this input in their microteachings alternately in formal classes. Following each performance, reflection papers were gathered from the non-performing student teachers (NPSTs) in order to evaluate their performing peers' (PSTs) OCF practices and thus reveal the ONOCEF components in their microteachings. Content analysis of the reflection papers demonstrated positive effects of the ONOCEF on both the PSTs' and NPSTs' competences concerning OCF. Through the ONOCEF, the PSTs were able to provide OCF effectively and use different OCF strategies while the NPSTs were successful locating their performing peers' non/corrections and identifying the shortcomings in their OCF practices. As a result, the ONOCEF proved to be an effective online tool to help pre-service ELT teachers promote their competences regarding OCF.

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Abstract: The global population of students pursuing studies abroad continues to grow, and consequently their intercultural experiences are receiving greater research attention. However, research into long-term student sojourners' academic development and personal growth is still in its infancy. A parallel mixed method study was designed to investigate the academic adjustment of international Chinese students who had studied in the UK for more than three years. Using interview data collected from both Chinese students and British teachers and questionnaire data collected from a wider sample of the Chinese students, the researcher examined the relationship between their academic, psychological, and social adjustment and provided a more holistic view of Chinese students' intercultural adaptation process. The results showed that the big challenge for the Chinese students during their early adjustment was to deal with the different perceptions of teaching and learning within their own culture and within the culture of their host country. Changes were found in their language ability, learning approaches, and sense of self over time. In particular, social support and their agency as a learner played an important role in their academic development.

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2018 - Research Article
Pisarik, C., Whelchel, T.
Views: 449       [2804]
Abstract: This study examined academic relevance from the perspective of college students. A qualitative focus group method was used to explore how students perceived the applicability and usefulness of their academic courses and coursework. Two focus groups of college students (N = 22) with varied class rank and academic majors were conducted. Data suggests that academic relevance is a complex construct; six distinct domains of academic relevance were identified. Students perceived their course work as relevant to their current and future academic endeavors, vocational preparation, and personal growth and development. Results provide a preliminary factorial structure to an underdeveloped yet important learning construct. Implications are discussed, and suggestions are offered to bolster students' perceptions of academic relevance.

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Abstract: This article reports the results of an experimental study that investigated the effectiveness of Google Earth and Wiki tools in improving the oral presentation skills of English as a Foreign Language (EFL) learners and boosting their motivation for learning. The participants (n =81) are enrolled in writing classes at two English-medium institutions. The study employed the factorial mixed methods pre-test/post-test control group experimental design. The experimental conditions included the experimental group's use of Google Earth and Wiki dynamics in conducting research and delivering oral presentations whereas participants in the control group were given the regular oral presentation and the research paper instruction. The findings of the study underscored the effectiveness of the integration of Google Earth and Wiki into classroom practices. Google Earth and Wiki allowed active learning with information. As such, Google Earth and Wiki improved learners' oral presentation skills and perceptions. Wiki visualization devices and structure could increase scaffolding and collaboration. Google Earth could facilitate critical thinking and true spatial analytical operations. The integration of Google Earth and Wiki could promote student-centered learning and motivation.

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Abstract: This study investigated the impact of cloud services on mathematics education students' mathematics confidence, affective engagement, and behavioral engagement in public universities in Benue State, Nigeria. Ex-post facto research design was adopted for the study. The instrument for the study was the researcher-developed Cloud Services Mathematics Attitude Scale - CSMAS (Cronbach Alpha Coefficient = 0.92). The CSMAS was administered to a sample of 328 mathematics education students drawn from the two public universities having operational cloud service delivery system in Benue State. Mean and standard deviation were used to answer research questions while t-test was used in testing the hypotheses. In-depth analysis of data revealed that there is a positive high level of impact of cloud services on the mathematics confidence (cluster mean = 2.85), affective engagement (cluster mean = 2.87) and behavioral engagement (cluster mean = 2.92) of mathematics education students in public universities in Benue State. The t-test analysis of mean attitude ratings established a statistically significant difference between the public universities; as well as male and female students. The outcome of this study has shown that the adoption of cloud services for augmenting learning results in strong positive mentality and confidence among mathematics education students in public universities in Benue State.

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Abstract: The purpose of this study was to investigate the potential of transformational teaching practices in learning and teaching of English as a second language in Pakistan. The study examined student descriptions about professorial charisma, intellectual stimulation, and individualized consideration in bachelor English programs, as well as how these variables predicted effective teaching in the English language classes. A sample of 490 undergraduate students responded to a survey in seven public and private universities in Pakistan. The findings indicated that the transformational teaching behaviors were associated with the effective teaching. Regression analysis indicated that professorial charisma, intellectual stimulation, and individualized consideration were significant predictors of effective teaching in the English language classes. The implications for the improvement of English education are considered.

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2018 - Research Article
Hill, D., Brunvand, S.
Views: 1388       [2852]
Abstract: The use of gamified learning has increased within the educational community over the last decade in an attempt to enhance student learning in multiple ways. In particular, researchers have started to examine gamified learning and its impact on student motivation and engagement within educational settings. However, few have examined the relationship between specific tools embedded within a learning management system (LMS) and student outcomes at the postsecondary level. The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of a grade predictor tool embedded within a gaming inspired learning management system on 75 college students' ability to accurately predict their final grades. Results indicated that all students reported using the tool on at least a monthly basis and that the majority of students were able to correctly predict their final grades.

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2018 - Research Article
Smith, T., Smith, S.
Views: 344       [2862]
Abstract: The Research Methods Skills Assessment (RMSA) was created to measure psychology majors' statistics knowledge and skills. The American Psychological Association's Guidelines for the Undergraduate Major in Psychology (APA, 2007, 2013) served as a framework for development. Results from a Rasch analysis with data from n=330 undergraduates showed good fit for 16 of the 21 items created. Validity analysis showed that using the RMSA to measure students' statistics knowledge was an improvement over the assessment recommended by the APA Guidelines and was less time consuming. Together the findings provide a preliminary test that can be further developed to provide a tool for instructors and departments to use when assessing psychology students' statistics knowledge and skills. Future research should expand the RMSA to include items that measure knowledge with confidence intervals as the proposed items were removed due to poor fit. Future studies should also aim to replicate the current findings with additional samples of psychology students.

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2018 - Research Article
Aliakbari, M., Hajizadeh, A.
Views: 337       [2898]
Abstract: There seems to be a diversity of opinions regarding the construct-relevant definition of impoliteness. Currently, it has been defined with reference to its occurrence in specific contexts. Universities are among those places where incivility is growing rapidly. Both students' and instructors' impolite behavior have been seen as a serious problem that highly interferes with the goals of education. Hence, the current study attempts to examine Iranian university students' perception of instructors' and students' uncivil behavior. The results indicated that academic incivility can be recognized a verbal, non-verbal, and/or as a combination of both. This study creates awareness about academic impoliteness especially in Iranian contexts and it might be a step towards tackling it.

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2018 - Research Article
Banks, B., D’Santiago-Eastman, V.
Views: 242       [2920]
Abstract: Underrepresentation of individuals from diverse backgrounds in the field of psychology is a well-documented concern, as identified gaps directly impact individuals served (Rogers & Molina, 2006; Zhang & Katsiyannis, 2002). This pilot examination evaluated a task force that sought to address this deficit through targeting the recruitment and retention of undergraduate students into graduate programs in psychology. Participants were 127 undergraduate students at a Midwestern university. Participants completed online surveys that assessed their knowledge of the organization's existence and taskforce events (e.g., open houses). Results indicate that the taskforce reached the appropriate undergraduate population, as participants of junior and senior status were more aware of organization resources. Future research should look to examine if the taskforce's efforts have impacted recruitment and retention outcomes.

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2018 - Research Article
Kunnari, I., Ilomäki, L., Toom, A.
Views: 380       [2943]
Abstract: Teachers' competence in launching and managing pedagogical change collaboratively is crucial for the continuous development of their work as well as for meaningful student learning. However, research on how teachers can thrive in their profession in the changing higher education environment is limited. This study investigated the experiences of teachers in managing pedagogical innovation when working as a team and implementing integrated competence-based learning modules. Strength-focused concepts like collective efficacy and resilience were used to extend the understanding of the phenomenon. Five teacher teams were analyzed in relation to the change itself, as well as to protective and risk factors that had an impact on teachers' collective efficacy and resilience to the change. The data consisted of group interviews and individual questionnaires collected during the process. The findings indicate that stronger collaboration creates significant changes in teachers' work and students' learning, and success is based on teacher teams' capacity to craft their common work practices.

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Abstract: In this study, the author, a teacher educator of color, explores her inability to successfully navigate a tension-filled moment in a teacher education diversity course while discussing ethnic and racial stereotypes. More specifically, using "inquiry as stance" and relocating personal pedagogical practice to social and critical practices through the conceptual lenses of "white racial supremacy" and "double consciousness", she investigates her dilemma that she uncomfortably confronts when a student of color speaks up against the majority of students in class who are white. In working through and theorizing the author's inner conflict, as she feels the commitment to support the student of color while also seeking validation by the majority students, she concludes that teacher educators of color committed to social justice work can unwittingly alienate the very students of color they are committed to inspire as an effect of internalized white supremacy. In the final section, the author argues that internalized white racial supremacy is an inevitable condition of structures of racial oppression, and a failure to recognize and study internalized white racial supremacy can hamper diversity and multicultural education that are meant to combat racism and further perpetuate existing racial hierarchies.

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2018 - Instruction Article
Yvonne, C., O'Brien, M., Slattery, D.
Views: 321       [2802]
Abstract: Entrepreneurs need to develop a range of skills to be successful, including skills in decision making, risk management, problem solving, communication, and teamwork. Games and simulations are increasingly being used in both academia and business to encourage such skills development. This paper describes a business simulation module whereby postgraduate students use a game to simulate managing and operating a business. The game replicates real-world scenarios, thereby providing an innovative and contextualized learning environment. This paper presents extracts from students' reflective essays, which describe various learning outcomes. The paper concludes with some guidelines for teachers considering integrating game-based learning into their curricula to facilitate skills development, as well as recommendations for future research.

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2018 - Instruction Article
West, J.
Views: 432       [2809]
Abstract: Many college students fall into the habit of coming to class unprepared, without having read assigned texts, or having read partially and superficially. As a consequence, they may take a passive stance, discussion can fall flat, and learning can be diminished. This article describes an instructional strategy for engaging students as active learners in preparing for class discussion and in the discussion itself. Using a modification of the literature circle model originated by Daniels (2002) and adapted for college learners by Larson, Young, & Leipham (2011a), the author describes a procedure in which students read, use organizing templates to write about their reading, and then draw on that writing for small-group and finally whole-class discussion. Grounded in research on active learning, reading compliance, and reading and writing to learn, the strategy presented here is a way to achieve higher quality discussion, and therefore deeper learning.

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2018 - Instruction Article
Walsh, K., Crookes, P., Ford, K., Doherty, K., Andersen, L., Bingham, S., McSherry , R.
Views: 256       [2832]
Abstract: Effective supervision in doctoral research is critical to successful and timely completion. However, supervision is a complex undertaking with structural as well as relational challenges for both students and supervisors. This instructional paper describes an internationally applicable approach to supervision that we have developed in the health and social care disciplines that offers structure, but is also dynamic and responsive to the needs of students and supervisors and aims to develop the research competency of students. Our approach called Solution Focused Research Supervision (SFRS) is based on solution focused approaches, adapted from Solution Focused Brief Therapy and questioning techniques derived from coaching. This approach has enabled our supervision teams to effectively develop focused research questions and decide on appropriate research methodologies and methods. We offer the SFRS approach as a way of working that seeks to recognize and build upon strengths, foster engagement and openness to learning as well as build trust between students and supervisors. The authors, from (countries deleted for peer review), are supervisors and students who have developed the approach and provide practical examples of its application.

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Abstract: This paper demonstrates how partnering with digital storytelling initiatives, like the StoryCorps project, can yield fruitful service-learning opportunities, while also supporting innovative approaches for teaching students from a range of disciplines who are enrolled in Introduction to Psychology (PSYC 1101). While various pedagogical tools for teaching psychology exist, StoryCorps provides a unique opportunity to expose students to a large range of people and related stories to which they may otherwise not have been exposed. This paper outlines a model for how a partnership with a local digital storytelling initiative (StoryCorps) can be integrated into a community engaged course and facilitate course activities reflecting an applied, multi-faceted learning environment. Preliminary data comparing student outcomes in the service-learning course to those in the traditional PSYC 1101 course are also discussed.

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