International Journal of Teaching and Learning in Higher Education
IJTLHE
International Journal of Teaching and Learning in Higher Education
IJTLHE
International Journal of Teaching and Learning in Higher Education
IJTLHE
International Journal of Teaching and Learning in Higher Education
IJTLHE
2019: Volume 31 Number 1
Reviewers for Issue 31(1)
Ali A. Abdi University of British Columbia
Norris Armstrong University of Georgia
Maria D. Avgerinou ACS Athens
Amy Cheney Appalachian State University
Colin Chesley Daytona State College
Jessica Chittum Association of American Colleges and Universities
Susan Clark Virginia Tech
Clare Dannenberg University of Alaska Anchorage
Denise DeGarmo Southern Illinois University
Terrence Doyle Ferris State University
Anna-May Edwards-Henry The University of the West Indies
Lisa Emerson Massey University
Susan Epps East Tennessee State University
Mark Fink Retired
Donald Finn Regent University
William Flora East Tennessee State University
Christopher Gearhart Tarleton State University
Rebecca Mattern Ghabour Wilmington University
Lilia Gomez-Lanier University of Georgia
Tony Harland University of Otago
Brian Higgins University of Kentucky College of Medicine
Randy Hollandsworth Piedmont College
Deyu Hu Virginia Tech
Dennis Humphrey Premier Academic Solutions
Sara Kajder University of Georgia
Alireza Karbalaei Farhangian University
Christine Kessen Marywood University
Pamela Kiser Elon University
Rita Kumar University of Cincinnati
Colleen M. Kuusinen University of Massachusetts, Amherst
Laura Levi Altstaedter East Carolina University
Stephen Daniel Looney Pennsylvania State University
Michael McEwan University of Glasgow
Heather L. Mello Nazarbayev University
Marina Micari Northwestern University
Gina Mollet Adams State College
Maung Thein Myint Civil Engineering Dept, New Mexico State University
Gale Parchoma University of Saskatchewan
Hyeri Park University of Georgia
Lisa Rohde University of Nebraska - Lincoln
Reuben Rose-Redwood University of Victoria
Ajay Sharma University of Georgia
Krista Terry Appalachian State University
Kenneth Tyler University of Kentucky
Veronica van Montfrans Virginia Tech
Darcelle White Eastern Michigan University
Jesse Wilkins Virginia Tech
Jennifer Wong Emory University
Sarah Zenti University of Georgia

2019 - Research Article
Chen, M.
Views: 425       [3119]
Abstract: This study explored whether second-language (L2) less proficient adult learners can become skilled readers by investigating the effect on students’ attitudes to strategy use when explicit instruction of metacognitive reading strategies is combined with an extensive reading approach. Studies have shown that proficient learners employ a wider range of metacognitive strategies than less proficient learners and use the strategies more efficiently and frequently. Teaching metacognitive strategies explicitly develops L2 learners into independent practitioners. Yet, little is known about the extent to which L2 less proficient students can incorporate metacognitive reading strategies in their reading. This paper addresses this issue by investigating students’ attitudes towards, and the use of, metacognitive strategies. The study was designed as a case study, and interview data and reflective journals were collected. The results show that L2 less proficient adult learners can become skilled readers through explicit instruction of metacognitive reading strategies combined with an extensive reading approach. The findings of the study reflect on explicit teaching of metacognitive strategies and extensive reading. The researcher suggests the value of introducing metacognitive strategies into L2 reading classrooms to broaden the learning skills of less proficient learners.

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2019 - Research Article
Lyman, M., Keyes, C.
Views: 296       [3170]
Abstract: Peer review enhances student knowledge acquisition and the ability to meaningfully apply that knowledge. Formative assessment is the source of much of the positive effect of the peer review process. This evaluation investigated the affective experiences of graduate students as they navigated the writing of their research proposals. The authors created a mixed-methods, quasi-experimental, pre-test/posttest, comparison and control group evaluation of a peer review process in a graduate research methods class. Students writing a research proposal reviewed each other’s proposals while receiving both formative and summative feedback from their professor. Pretest/posttest findings showed that students experiencing the peer review process reported reduced anxiety and improved scores on an assessment of their experience of the research process. Qualitative findings suggest that the peer review process helped with content mastery and created peer support that reduced assignment-related anxiety. Peer review is recommended as a tool that reduces research anxiety and helps students feel more confident in their abilities, even if they are not enthusiastic about research methods as a topic or a skill.

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2019 - Research Article
Smith, T.
Views: 308       [3172]
Abstract: Discussion forums are often a primary tool used for teaching and learning in asynchronous online courses. In this article, the author shares her experiences using discussion forums to promote learning, teacher presence, and community. In a retrospective microanalysis of discussion forums posts and interactions, the author identified five major purposes for discussion forums. Here, she details the rationale, mechanics, and interactions yielded for each type. Specific language of forum prompts, as well as teacher and student posts and interactions, are provided so that readers can, if interested, apply and/or modify the forum types.

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As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.


2019 - Research Article
He, W., Holton, A., Gu, H., Warschauer, M., Farkas, G.
Views: 689       [3195]
Abstract: This study assessed the impact of flipped instruction on study effort, exam performance, motivation, and perceived class quality in two sections of an introductory chemistry course. Giving frequent assignments and quizzes provided enough incentive to ensure pre-class study compliance, and flipped instruction did not appreciably increase overall study time. However, technology failures early in the class show an important lesson of what can occur when a teaching modality dependent on technology is used. Unlike in our previous study, flipped students underperformed their control counterparts in the final exam. Differentiated treatment effects were identified, as sophomores and females benefited more from flipped instruction. Similar trends were also observed with student letter grades from a subsequent chemistry course. Flipped instruction did not increase student general motivation. Flipped females, however, exhibited stronger end-of-quarter motivation than flipped males. Flipped students perceived the class to be of lower quality and expressed discontent with in-class technology failures and active learning techniques. We reflect upon the resilience of the traditional lecture format and suggest that new pedagogical methods be implemented at a conservative rate to preserve student learning outcomes in the face of implementation issues.

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As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.


2019 - Research Article
Thibodeaux, T., Harapnuik, D., Cummings, C.
Views: 373       [3199]
Abstract: This study used grounded theory analysis to examine and analyze student perceptions of the influence of choice, ownership, and voice on learning and the learning environment in an online M. Ed. program in the southeastern region of the United States. Choice, ownership, and voice make up three of the four components of the learner-centered approach called the COVA learning approach developed by Harapnuik, Thibodeaux, and Cummings. Literature related to constructivism, metacognition, and reflection confirms through years of research that choice, ownership, and voice through authentic learning opportunities have the potential to positively influence learning. Seventy-three graduate students in the M. Ed. program completed a survey indicating their agreement with statements that gave them choice, ownership, and voice in learning and the learning environment. The study further examined graduate students’ candid perceptions for the purpose of identifying themes that related to choice, ownership, and voice in learning and the learning environment. Results showed that all three components positively influenced the learners’ experience and that metacognitive practices and opportunities for reflection assisted students as they developed their voice as learners.

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2019 - Research Article
Ziegenfuss, D., Furse, C., Buendia, E., Sykes, E.
Views: 256       [3226]
Abstract: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the design and implementation of an international faculty development MOOC about flipped teaching. Qualitative and quantitative data, such as traditional MOOC analytics, interviews, and Concerns-Based Adoption Model (CBAM) survey data, were collected as participants learned how to flip instruction. This study indicates that measures of online engagement, such as number of clicks and number of online discussion posts, do not necessarily translate to a change in attitudes about teaching practice. Adult participants (teachers, faculty, and researchers) in this MOOC presented as strategic learners and applied personalized approaches for their own teaching development while learning in a MOOC.

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Abstract: Situated within the CID (Communication in the Disciplines) theoretical framework that promotes the focus of communication instruction on the oral genre standards of effectiveness, and employing a transdisciplinary approach, the current study explores science students’ attitudes and motivation concerning an oral skills development (OSD) intervention. The cross-disciplinary based intervention involved the delivery of an oral skills development module over a ten-week period to thirty-four chemistry students in which staff from the English language section partnered with lecturers in chemistry to enhance these students’ oral presentation of chemistry-based content. The performance of students participating in the module was compared with that of non-OSD chemistry students to verify whether there was a significant difference in performance. Surveys were also undertaken on OSD Chemistry students to see whether or not there was a significant change in attitude after the intervention. Results revealed a significant difference between OSD and non OSD students on a similar oral presentation task with OSD students attaining a higher level of performance. OSD students also demonstrated a positive, significant change in attitude post intervention. Implications of the findings, as well as possible areas for further research, are discussed.

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Abstract: This study analyzes students’ academic self-efficacy while studying in international master’s degree programs in Finland. The primary aim is to determine if students’ self-efficacy varies depending on their field of study and nationality. This study contributes to the research on students’ self-efficacy in an international academic context with a special focus on social and course performance tasks. The results indicate some variations in students’ self-efficacy, particularly in students from different fields of study. Recommendations for activities supporting students’ self-efficacy are provided based on the results of the analysis. Implications for future research, as well as limitations of the study, are discussed.

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2019 - Research Article
Achen, R., Warren, C., Fazzari, A., Jorich, H., Thorne, K.
Views: 259       [3240]
Abstract: Out-of-class experiences provide important learning opportunities for students; however, limited research has explored the value of these experiences to graduate students. The purpose of this study was to evaluate graduate sport management students’ professional field trip experiences to determine if they met student expectations and achieved trip learning objectives. Results from pre- and post-trip surveys, a student focus group, and industry professional interviews suggested the trip exceeded expectations overall. Specifically, it improved students’ professional preparation, helped them connect to course content, and increased their connection to the academic program. Students perceived the trip to be a valuable educational and social experience. Sport management faculty should consider coordinating field trips for graduate students, as they perceive them to be beneficial to their learning and graduate student experience. Also, evaluating out-of-class experiences is valuable for improving institutional support and providing evidence of student learning outcomes.

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2019 - Research Article
Buskirk-Cohen, A., Plants, A.
Views: 361       [3252]
Abstract: Retention in higher education has become an important area of focus in recent years; however, much of the research has been conducted on large, research-intensive universities, leading to questions of whether these findings apply to institutions with different characteristics. In the current study, forty-four students at a small, teaching-focused university completed self-report measures on their academic success (performance and commitment), sense of belonging, and grit. Participants were classified as belonging to one of four groups: HPHC (high performing, high commitment), HPLC (high performing, low commitment), LPHC (low performing, high commitment), or LPLC (low performing, low commitment). ANOVAs and post-hoc tests revealed that LPLC students were significantly lower than all other groups on self-reported professors’ pedagogical caring. Interestingly, no group differences emerged for grit, social acceptance, or global university belonging. Implications for prevention and intervention programs are discussed.

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Abstract: Investigations into attrition of STEM-intending students indicate that poor experiences in introductory courses are at least partly to blame, specifically the students’ frustration with lecture-driven teaching methods. In this research, hierarchical linear modeling is used to identify the individual and situational characteristics of instructors who support the use of student-centered pedagogy in Calculus I. Of specific interest are the effects of class size and perceived departmental support on an instructor’s employment of student-centered pedagogical approaches. Overall, the effects of class size and support are functioning as the literature would suggest: instructors with large classes and minimal departmental support report lower usage of student-centered pedagogical approaches. The interesting finding is that these effects are more salient at the institutional level as compared with the instructor level. By analyzing national data gathered from 490 instructors distributed across 160 institutions, the findings of this research provide large-scale empirical support for several interview studies that have identified the importance of situational characteristics and highlight the importance of institutional context over the context experienced by individuals. Furthermore, this research suggests that change strategies might be more effectively supported through the department chair and/or course coordinators, as opposed to targeting individual instructors through professional development opportunities.

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As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.


2019 - Research Article
Kelling, A., Varma, S., Kelling, N.
Views: 225       [3285]
Abstract: Online courses are ubiquitous, but the research findings on student learning outcomes and opinions of these courses are mixed. Therefore, this research comprehensively investigated online courses at UHCL by analyzing them from the perspective of both user groups, students who consume the courses and faculty who deliver the courses. For this study, the examination was performed through questionnaires and archival data to achieve as complete a picture of online courses at the University of Houston-Clear Lake as possible. Face-to-face courses tended to be favored in terms of both student performance measures and faculty and student opinions. However, the advantages of online courses resulted in equality in terms of student preference to take and faculty effort to teach these courses. Suggestions for supporting online students are discussed.

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As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.


Abstract: The case study approach is one form of problem-based learning (PBL) that results in deeper understanding of content, and it involves pushing students to think beyond the answers appropriate for class (Hmelo-Silver, 2004; Nilson, 2010, 2013). Case studies prompt students to consider the realistic implications of how they use course content in realistic scenarios that are relevant to their future practice. According to Nilson (2010), continuous case studies are one form of case-based learning that often leads to a uniquely deeper learning experience for students. This paper describes the design of a continuous case study assignment for use in the classroom—as an interactive lecture or independent assignment—and as a data collection tool. Continuous case studies are useful at both the undergraduate and graduate levels and are highly adaptable across disciplines. The focuses of this paper are a) to define and describe the continuous case study, including the evidence-driven design process, and b) to offer practical examples of how to implement the design for classroom or scholarly use.

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2019 - Instruction Article
Sarvis, J., Silvers, P.
Views: 218       [3178]
Abstract: Much effective teacher education literature supports engaging pre-service teacher candidates (PST’s) in a process of learning about teaching by preparing for and rehearsing the practice with guided instruction, implementing the practice with students in a classroom, and analyzing the experience to better understand ways to improve and become more effective moving forward (McDonald, Kazemi, & Schneider Kavanagh, 2013). To achieve this, there is a need for continuing collaboration with a partner school to provide candidates with mentoring and supervision. This article presents information about the successful implementation of the first two years of a re-designed field-based residency model aimed at increasing positive student outcomes for Hispanic and other historically marginalized students in teacher education. Reflective data from faculty, teacher candidates, and school administrators provide insight into ways partnerships can be reciprocal for both candidates and mentor teachers. Data also reveal gaps in our initial planning and the need for greater understanding of the complexities of building relationships. Information includes lessons learned and insights that have informed plans for change moving forward as we have gained deeper understanding of partnering with elementary schools, as well as ways to structure teaching and professional preparation to best support PST candidates.

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2019 - Instruction Article
Duncan, T., Redwine, R.
Views: 285       [3184]
Abstract: As a profession, we must have a shift in both perspective and practice to transform teaching at all levels. Are pre-service education classrooms preparing students to be flexible, adapt to new situations, and rely on their own expertise and understanding while seeking support when needed? Lieberman and Miller (2004) identify the following shifts for transforming the social realities of teaching: from individualism to professional community; from teaching at the center to learning at the center and from technical and managed work to inquiry and leadership (p. 11). The authors seek to critically examine the perspectives of pre-service teachers participating in a social studies methods course using constructivist practices.

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2019 - Instruction Article
O'Neill, M., Bandelt, M., Adams, M., Chester, S., Cai, W., Nadimpalli, S.
Views: 298       [3275]
Abstract: The 21st century STEM researcher is increasingly called upon to work collaboratively on large-scale societal challenges. In this setting, disciplinary methods and methodologies may function as starting points, but they lack a focus on the metacognition and inquiry-based thinking required to analyze, evaluate, and synthesize diverse global problems. Transdisciplinary theories of learning push researchers and students to make just such a move beyond the boundaries of disciplinarity and toward the co-creation and co-use of knowledge that is the result of interactions between the academic disciplines and society: government, industry, and civil society. For graduate programs with limited financial resources, faculty resources, and collaborative working spaces, cohort learning models may ameliorate the practical “costs” of transdisciplinary research and education while providing precisely the environment in which it may flourish. This article presents the rationale, structure, and assessment plan for one such STEM cohort learning community.

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