International Journal of Teaching and Learning in Higher Education
IJTLHE
International Journal of Teaching and Learning in Higher Education
IJTLHE
International Journal of Teaching and Learning in Higher Education
IJTLHE
International Journal of Teaching and Learning in Higher Education
IJTLHE
Show All Articles by Views
In this case, Article Views and Article Downloads are the same thing since articles are only available in PDF. When an article link is selected, the PDF is viewed and can be downloaded using the File option.
Rank: 1
Abstract: This two-part study investigates perceptions of interactive classroom teaching techniques for adult learning. In the first part of the study 62 college faculty members and 45 corporate trainers were surveyed about their teaching and training methods. The survey had two main objectives: to determine rates of classroom techniques used, and to determine influences on teaching styles. Trainers used a greater variety of teaching techniques in their presentations, such as visuals and interactive exercises including games, and spent less time on lecturing than their college faculty counterparts. Both groups identified their temperament as the main influence on their teaching style. Several other influences on teaching style were cited with similar frequency by the two groups, but trainers reported using mentors and instructors? guides more frequently than college instructors did. In the second part of the study, five faculty members were mentored to change traditional lectures to interactive games. A review of their perceptions of success and difficulty in using such activities in the college classroom, their students? perceptions of the exercise, and student performance identified both benefits and costs. Suggestions are made for strategies to successfully implement games in the college classroom, based on consideration of these benefits and costs and the survey results.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 2
2005 - Instruction Article
Harris, M.
Views: 26742       [28]
Abstract: The instructional model presented is based upon the premise that abstracts and critiques are initial stages of scholarly writing. The pedagogy described is grounded in principles of effective lesson planning, instruction, and evaluation techniques. Step 1: Laying the Foundation describes how to teach students the difference between good term paper writing and scholarly writing. Step 2: Communicating Expectations and Evaluation Criteria presents the content and use of guidelines and rubric. Step 3: Scaffolding for Success outlines the use of journals, peer review, specific instruction, and resources. Initial students’ success and positive feedback suggest that this instructional model has merit.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 3
2005 - Research Article
Mullen, C., Greenlee, B., Bruner, D.
Views: 15163       [17]
Abstract: A team of curricular leadership pedagogues report the experience of studying their own classroom practice as they engaged educational leadership (EDL) students in sustained, reflective inquiry for the related purposes of clarifying their own meaning systems and experiencing self-empowerment. This descriptive, exploratory qualitative study encouraged students to inquire into and develop metaphorical images that reveal fundamental complexities and challenges of the theory–practice relationship. The areas of theory and practice, metaphor, and reflection are reviewed and workshop design and collaborative activities, including Blackboard and metaphoric displays, are described. Students defined theory and practice, used a binocular/integration metaphor to describe the theory–practice relationship, applied an architect/builder metaphor to accomplish this end, and created a metaphor of their own. Three patterns emerged from the data: (a) regarding the relationship between theory and practice, discourse connotes separation, interaction, or integration; (b) communication between practitioners and theorists is rooted in authority, distance, and difference; and (c) while power must be equal for focus and balance to occur, disequilibrium characterizes many teacher contexts.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 4
2007 - Instruction Article
Attle, S., Baker, B.
Views: 13441       [121]
Abstract: Many university level programs are obligated to prepare students for professional employment while simultaneously providing the academic rigor consistent with university level study. These programs include but are not limited to: commercial recreation, sport management, therapeutic recreation, marketing, accounting, and law. Consequently, an education in any of these areas has to not only foster student learning, but also enhance opportunities for students? professional development. Professional studies classrooms provide exceptional opportunities to facilitate team-like cooperation in a competitive business-like environment. Instructors can utilize these unique instructional opportunities in order to maximize student learning and professional development, preparing them both to cooperate and compete by structuring learning activities that require them to cooperate in teams that compete against one another. This paper presents a rationale for using cooperation and competition in higher education classrooms and then provides an example of the application of these techniques in a capstone commercial recreation class.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 5
Abstract: Many undergraduate degree programs require students to develop a basic understanding of research methodology. Unfortunately, methods courses are typically unpopular with students because the course material is complex and technical in nature. Consequently, some instructors supplement traditional lecture-text classes with active learning experiences such as a student-developed research project. This paper describes a research methods course in the social sciences (psychology) based solely on multiple student-developed research projects. The paper highlights the strengths and weaknesses of this non-traditional approach to teaching research methods.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 6
2005 - Instruction Article
Limbach, B., Waugh, W., Duron, R.
Views: 12076       [55]
Abstract: This paper identifies a 5-step framework that can be implemented in virtually any teaching or training setting to effectively move learners toward critical thinking. This interdisciplinary model, which is built upon existing theory and best practices in cognitive development, effective learning environments, and outcomes-based assessment, provides teachers with a useful framework. This framework can be used to move students toward a more active-learning environment which, ultimately, is more enjoyable and effective for teachers and students alike. An example of the model is applied in the context of accounting education, which represents a business discipline in which critical thinking has been consistently cited as both necessary and difficult to implement.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 7
2006 - Instruction Article
Cerbin, W., Kopp, B.
Views: 12012       [110]
Abstract: This paper proposes a model for building pedagogical knowledge and improving teaching based on the practice of lesson study. In lesson study a small group of instructors jointly designs, teaches, studies and refines a single class lesson called a research lesson. We describe how college teachers can do lesson study in their classrooms. We explore how the practice of lesson study creates multiple pathways for improving teaching and how the knowledge teachers create can help to advance the practice of teaching in their fields.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 8
Abstract: This article reviews How did you get here? Students with disabilities and their journeys to Harvard, written by Thomas Herir and Laura A. Schifter. The authors explain the collegiate success stories of several students with varied disabilities and extrapolate themes from interviews with the students and people close to each of them. The book includes many detailed examples and thoughtful questions lead the analysis throughout. Overall, I highly recommend this book as the stories can be an inspiration to any student. Additionally, this book would be a fantastic addition to a course for new professionals in schools or for parents of a child with a disability. Publisher: Harvard Education Press (Boston. MA, 2015). ISBN: 9781612507811. List price: $35.00 (U.S.). 252 pages.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 9
2005 - Instruction Article
Doolittle, P., Hicks, D., Triplett, C., Nichols, W., Young, C.
Views: 9917       [1]
Abstract: Assigning students the reading of historical texts, scholarly articles, popular press books, and/or Internet publications is common in higher education. Perhaps equally common is instructor disappointment in students' comprehension of assigned readings. This lack of good reading comprehension skills is exacerbated by the central role of reading comprehension in higher education success. One solution to this problem of poor reading comprehension skills is the explicit teaching of reading comprehension strategies to both undergraduate and graduate students, specifically, reciprocal teaching. In the following article the foundations and methods of reciprocal teaching are defined and then each author, in turn, delineates how he or she uses reciprocal teaching in his or her classroom. These examples demonstrate the flexibility and transferability of this basic strategy as the five authors teach in an array of domains.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 10
2008 - Research Article
Goi, C., Ng, P.
Views: 9304       [357]
Abstract: The main objective of this study was to identify successful factors in implementing an e-learning program. Existing literature has identified several successful factors in implementing an e-learning program. These factors include program content, web page accessibility, learners’ participation and involvement, web site security and support, institution commitment, interactive learning environment, instructor competency, and presentation and design. All these factors were tested together with other related criteria which are important for e-learning program implementation. The samples were collected based on quantitative methods, specifically, self-administrated questionnaires. All the criteria that were tested to see if they were important in an e-learning program implementation.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 11
2005 - Research Article
Mattern, R.
Views: 9008       [11]
Abstract: Theorists in the area of academic motivation have distinguished between mastery goals (develop understanding) and performance goals (demonstrate ability). Numerous research studies have empirically examined the implications these “constructs” have for understanding students’ performance in the classroom. Traditionally, mastery goals have been associated with adaptive learning outcomes while performance goals have been associated with maladaptive learning outcomes. Recently, however, theorists have suggested that students might hold both mastery and performance goals and that both goals can be beneficial. This study compared the achievement patterns of students who held both goals simultaneously to students who held either mastery or performance goals only. Data was collected within a foundational teacher education course from 143 students, a portion of whom were found to hold high mastery goals (mastery oriented), high performance-approach goals (performance-approach oriented), and high mastery and high performance goals (multiple goal orientation). Using course grades as an indicator of achievement, a one-way ANOVA showed no significant difference between the multiple goal group and the single goal groups. However, a significant difference was found between the high mastery group and the high performance group.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 12
2005 - Research Article
Hatzipanagos, S., Lygo-Baker, S.
Views: 8503       [52]
Abstract: Teaching observations in a Higher Education context can be underpinned by an observer’s intention to enhance learning and teaching or used as a managerial tool to ensure standards are met or maintained. In this article, we investigate whether the emphasis on the developmental value of teaching observations is misleading. We seek to examine whether the ‘educational developers as observers’ model actually provides evidence that teaching observation can be developmental and stimulate reflective practice despite the approach stemming from government initiatives towards standards-driven teaching. The conclusions provide a view of whether this has implications for fostering formative notions such as critical reflection and enhancement of teaching practice, via the developmental nature of the scheme.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 13
Abstract: In recent years, conceptions of teaching held by academic staff have achieved an increased focus in the scholarly and practical work of teaching developers. Views on the impact of conceptions of teaching on improving university teaching, as well as their significance in doing so, vary from those that advocate changing conceptions as a necessary first step in the process of improvement to more recent views that characterize conceptions of teaching as merely artifacts of reflection on teaching. This paper explores this range of views, raises a number of questions about the current accepted views on the importance of conceptions of teaching development work, and challenges the current accepted wisdom in this important area.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 14
2005 - Instruction Article
Joyes, G., Fritze, P.
Views: 8276       [13]
Abstract: The Internet has the potential to connect global communities of learners who share a common interest and yet who have diverse cultural backgrounds and experiences, which shape their current understandings. This paper describes and reflects upon the ways these individual differences in experience and understandings are valued and placed at the centre of the student learning experience in an online module of a Professional Doctorate in Teacher Education program. It explores how the online learning experience has been developed to leverage from successful face-to-face implementation and identifies differences between the two modes, in particular the added value of working online. Issues related to the nature of the support mechanisms necessary for successful online learning are discussed. This development was part of collaboration between the University of Melbourne, Australia where the online technology was developed and the University of Nottingham, United Kingdom, where the course is offered. Parallels between the online collaborative work experiences of the international partner developers and students are highlighted.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 15
2006 - Instruction Article
Toledo, C.
Views: 7571       [85]
Abstract: One of the challenges of asynchronous online discussions is soliciting student responses that involve critical thinking. Too often students answer one another with "I agree" or "That's what I think" and the discussion dead ends. By providing students with models of good questioning techniques instructors will see the class discussion take on new depth. This article provides online course facilitators with an approach to questioning that can deepen student interactions in asynchronous discussions.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 16
2005 - Research Article
Hammann, L.
Views: 6817       [14]
Abstract: This study investigated writing beliefs, self-regulatory behaviors, and epistemology beliefs of preservice teachers in academic writing tasks. Students completed self-report measures of self-regulation, epistemology, and beliefs about writing. Both knowledge and regulation of cognition were positively related to writing enjoyment, and knowledge of cognition was negatively related to beliefs of ability as a fixed entity. Enjoyment of writing was related to learnability and self-assessment. It may be that students who are more self-regulated during writing also believe they can learn to improve their writing skills. It may be, however, that students who believe writing is learnable will exert the effort to self-regulate during writing. Student beliefs and feelings about learning and writing play an important and complex role in their self-regulation behaviors. Suggestions for instruction are included, and continued research of students’ beliefs and self-regulation in naturalistic contexts is recommended.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 17
2007 - Instruction Article
Fields, J.
Views: 6661       [160]
Abstract: This paper is an examination of utilizing the J.K. Rowling Harry Potter series as a teaching tool for introductory sociology courses. Because of the ease in comparing the Wizard culture in which Harry lives with their own culture, students apply critical thinking skills and thus increase their ability to think beyond their own, immediate social systems carrying them to stages three and four, application and analysis, in Bloom?s Taxonomy. Particular strengths of the Harry Potter series are illustrations of sociological theories and social processes; examples of social stratification; and explanations of basic sociological concepts such as norms, sanctions, and deviance For this class, students are required to read the first two books or watch the movies adapted from these books. In addition, they must read the third and fourth books in the series as the movie adaptations omit significant sociological parallels. These books and movies increase abstract understanding of sociological concepts as they apply to the fictional world of wizards. These abstractions become concrete as students apply this understanding to the analysis of their own place in their social environments.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 18
Abstract: This paper looks at the digital native-digital immigrant model presented by Prensky, addresses some of the nuances of each group, and proposes the addition of another group to describe many of the non-users of technology we find throughout education. Suggestions to assist faculty in integrating appropriate technologies into their teaching are provided.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 19
Abstract: Web 2.0 and its associated applications and tools have, in many areas, brought about and are continuing to bring about significant shifts in the way people communicate, create, and share information. Pervasive access to broadband Internet connectivity and communication services has created new forms of relationships and patterns of communicating and learning. The expanding lexicon of Web 2.0 applications (podcasts, web logs, wikis, mashups, etc.) signal changes in the learning landscape, where learners are active participants, creators of knowledge, and seekers of engaging, personal experiences. In what has been called a culture of participation, the line separating consumers and producers of content is becoming blurred and we are witnessing a new wave of "prosumers," very often learners, who are actively creating and sharing content and ideas. By adopting an innovative learning paradigm that the authors call Pedagogy 2.0, teaching and learning strategies can enable greater engagement of learners in shaping the education they receive through participatory choice, personal voice, and ultimately, "co-production."

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 20
2007 - Research Article
Donnelly, R.
Views: 5962       [167]
Abstract: This paper explores participant perceptions of the impact of a Peer Observation of Teaching scheme offered as part of an accredited Postgraduate Certificate in Teaching for academic staff and faculty members in higher education. The Postgraduate Certificate Program has been designed to support the continuing professional development of academic staff and faculty members through integration of peer learning. Inherent in the design and delivery of the Peer Observation of Teaching scheme is the belief by all involved that learning about teaching in higher education ? and heightening a sense of professionalism ? stems from a continuous process of transforming and constructing personal meaning in a variety of related ways. This program has its theoretical basis in the Experiential Learning Cycle (Kolb, 1983), and the perceived impact of the scheme has been evaluated based on this cycle; participants over the past 5 years on the program have provided valuable insights into the demands of active engagement with abstract pedagogical theory, purposeful critical refection on classroom practice, and a challenging of assumptions through shared reflective dialogues with colleagues. Of particular interest are the ways that the scheme aids the integration of theory and practice, the value of interdisciplinary learning, and the benefits for new teachers.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 21
2007 - Research Article
Glowacki-Dudka, M., Barnett, N.
Views: 5952       [141]
Abstract: This qualitative multi-case study explored the space where critical reflection and group development met within the online environment for the adult learner. Using critical reflection with adult learners through their responses to Stephen Brookfield?s (1995) Critical Incident Questionnaire (CIQ) in the online environment precipitated instructional effectiveness by unearthing reactions to the online environment and provided a consistent framework for assessing group development. The study context included two sixteen-week, online, asynchronous graduate courses on adult teaching strategies at a research-intensive university located in Midwestern United States. The findings reflected evidence of Tuckman?s (1965) and Tuckman and Jensen?s (1977) group development sequence of forming, storming, norming, performing, and adjourning within both courses. The analysis and implications were related to critical reflection, group development, the online environment, and adult learning.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 22
2007 - Research Article
Dees, D., Ingram, A., Kovalik, C., Allen-Huffman, M., McClelland, A., Justice, L.
Views: 5674       [187]
Abstract: College teaching is a complex endeavor, which can be difficult to understand. Teacher reflection has become one means of comprehending the intricacies associated with teaching and learning. An abundant literature base examines individual elements of teaching, but looking at individual elements may encourage reflection on just a part of the process. The Teaching/Learning Transactional (T/LT) model provides a framework to guide reflection. This paper outlines the components of the model and provides a case study that represents its application. The T/LT model encourages teacher reflection that views teaching holistically. It is designed to encourage dialogue that frames teaching as a complex encounter of the human experience. Changing the language we use to discuss teaching may serve to deepen our understanding of this complex act, and in turn, improve overall practice.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 23
Abstract: The transnational widening of participation in higher education (HE) and the concomitant emphasis on promoting successful progression and high retention are focusing attention on how best to create supportive learning environments in HE. Using a phenomenographic approach, we explore variance in how first year undergraduate students experience the learning of generic, subject-related and metacognitive skills within a study skills module integrated into education programs. The findings suggest responses ranging from a lack of engagement in the module to evidence of increased confidence, criticality, self-reflection and change as a learner. The conclusion posits alternative ways of promoting the learning of study skills, which, whilst potentially including all learners, bring significant ramifications for the professional development of university lecturers.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 24
2005 - Instruction Article
Bodenhorn, N., Jackson, A., Farrell, R.
Views: 5539       [7]
Abstract: Pairs of first year master’s level students in the “Counseling Diverse Populations” course led discussion groups with international students about U.S. culture. The fundamental purpose of this assignment was to increase awareness of the counseling students’ culture, as called for in the Multicultural Counseling Competencies. Advance preparation resulted in a combined class list of questions. Each session was video taped and feedback was provided. In this paper, segments of a discussion group transcript, student reflection paper, and professor feedback are provided. Over three years, students have rated this assignment as one of the most valuable assignment of the semester.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 25
2006 - Research Article
Meyers, S., Bender, J., Hill, E., Thomas, S.
Views: 5413       [115]
Abstract: We present descriptive data about the nature and correlates of classroom conflict using a national sample of 226 faculty members. We differentiated two different types of conflict, inattentive versus hostile, in our survey. Levels of conflict were not associated with instructors? demographic traits or characteristics of their courses, but were related to professors? choice of teaching methods, their demeanor, and how they responded to challenging situations. We also found that those conflict management techniques that address the relationship between faculty and students were most effective in reducing conflict.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 26
2005 - Research Article
Md.Yunus, A., Hamzah, R., Ahmad Tarmizi, R., Abu, R., Md.Nor, S., Ismail, H., Wan Ali, W., Abu Bakar, K.
Views: 5403       [50]
Abstract: Problem solving abilities of college graduates have received considerable attention among employers, university professors and the public at large. Problem solving is a generic skill that needs to be acquired in ensuring success in learning and in the workplace. This study focuses on problem solving abilities of Malaysian university students from the faculties of Engineering, Science, Computer Science, Medicine, Management and Law. A total of 3025 respondents participated in this study. Samples were chosen from seven public universities and two private universities. Data were collected using the Problem Solving Skills Scale (PSSS) component of the Social Problem Solving Inventory (SPSI). The SPSI consists of two major scales, Problem Orientation Scale (POS) and Problem Solving Skills Scale (PSSS). The purpose of this study was to describe the overall problem solving abilities of Malaysian university students, with comparisons made based on year of study and fields of study. There were significant difference between problem solving abilities of (a) final year and first year students, and (b) students from different fields of study.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 27
2008 - Instruction Article
Bronack, S., Sanders, R., Cheney, A., Riedl, R., Tashner, J., Matzen, N.
Views: 5394       [453]
Abstract: As the use of 3D immersive virtual worlds in higher education expands, it is important to examine which pedagogical approaches are most likely to bring about success. AET Zone, a 3D immersive virtual world in use for more than seven years, is one embodiment of pedagogical innovation that capitalizes on what virtual worlds have to offer to social aspects of teaching and learning. The authors have characterized this approach as Presence Pedagogy (P2), a way of teaching and learning that is grounded in social constructivist theory. In it, the concepts of presence, building a true community of practice, and constructing an online environment which fosters collaboration for reflective learning are paramount. Unlike learning communities that might emerge from a particular course taught under more traditional circumstances, students engaged in a P2 learning environment become members of a broader community of practice in which everyone in the community is a potential instructor, peer, expert, and novice - all of whom learn with and from one another.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 28
2007 - Review Article
Levi Altstaedter, L.
Views: 5197       [398]
Abstract: Ken Bain, in his 2004 book What the Best College Teachers Do, delves into the topic of best teaching practices in college education. This review focuses on the key elements Bain identifies as those which frame the unique components that help define best teaching, which can be divided into three broad categories: knowledge about teaching, knowledge about students, and knowledge about learning. The review includes detailed descriptions of each of the three categories.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 29
Abstract: This paper examines some of the dominant discourses related to poverty and education such as those offered by the prominent political ideologies, those presented by educators who write about poverty, those embedded in popular culture, and those surrounding current teacher education curricula. Furthermore, this study evaluates the impact these discourses have on teacher education students, and ultimately on the students they engage. The results of a 15 item survey, distributed to teacher education students at a Midwest university, reveal their perceptions on poverty and offer many potential departure points for educators to consider. Additionally, this paper analyzes the implications of the data for teacher education curricula. The results of the study revealed that teacher education students employ conventional discourses and idioms in their understanding of poverty. The study makes clear that to adequately deal with issues of poverty in their classrooms, teacher education students need to be conversant with the multiple discourses of poverty and require opportunities to develop empathetic responses to poverty and learn to think about poverty from multiple points of view. Additionally, teachers need to learn a range of strategies that will shatter their assumptions about poverty and in turn prepare them to respond in a variety of ways.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 30
Abstract: This paper reports on an investigation into the changes in students? attitudes towards learning English in a Malaysian college. The main focus of the study is to investigate the changes in attitudes towards learning English during the critical transition period from secondary school, where the medium of instruction is Malay, to college, where the medium of instruction is in English. Other factors like classroom and school environment, teaching methodologies, and the influence of home background were also considered. A sample of 100 students enrolled in a first level English course during their first semester in a Malaysian college was used for the study. Data were collected using students? weekly journals and interviews of students. Analysis of the data was done qualitatively using an interpretive approach. The findings revealed that there were differences in students? perceptions of and attitudes towards learning English in secondary school and college. Students? attitudes seemed more positive in college and they perceived the college social and classroom environment to be more conducive for learning English. The implications from the study suggest that the school social environment and the family background influence students? attitudes towards learning English.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 31
Abstract: This study explored the benefits and limitations of mentoring relationships between pre-service and practicing K-12 teachers. Thirteen pre-service education students at a university in the southeastern United States and 17 practicing teachers from four states participated. The student participants were in their senior year in a teacher education program, during the semester just previous to their student teaching experience. Pre- and post-surveys, email exchanges and student email reflections were utilized to gather data concerning the effectiveness of the project. Results indicated that online mentoring was overall a highly positive experience that provided the student participants unique and practical insight into the field of teaching. The experience was not without problems however, as student participants voiced concern with the procedure for obtaining mentors, timely responses from some mentors and the degree to which their questions were addressed in some cases.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 32
2008 - Instruction Article
Russell-Bowie, D.
Views: 4162       [345]
Abstract: Community engagement has been used for many years to enhance and strengthen teacher education courses, preparing student teachers with real life learning experiences as they work with community groups in mutually beneficial projects. This research examines a community engagement project that involved 13 undergraduate creative arts students who were planning to enroll in a post-graduate teacher education degree course when they had completed their initial degree. The students were placed in a primary school to work on a variety of creative arts-based projects with a range of teachers and classes with the aim of learning skills, knowledge, and strategies about teaching in relation to the creative arts. Outcomes from the project included an increasing confidence and competence in relation to teaching skills, knowledge, and strategies by the students as they were involved in the action – reflection cycle of community engagement. The school community also benefited from the project as children were developing creative arts skills and knowledge as they worked with the university students, and the teachers gained new ideas in relation to implementing the creative arts in their classrooms.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 33
Abstract: Students learn in diverse ways; therefore, instructors must utilize a wide variety of instructional strategies. Students benefit when instructors use instructional strategies that promote active engagement. In-class debates cultivate the active engagement of students, yet participation in debates is often limited to students involved in debate teams. The benefits of using in-class debates as an instructional strategy also include mastery of the content and the development of critical thinking skills, empathy, and oral communication skills. Debate as an instructional strategy, however, has its opponents. Some believe debates reinforce a bias toward dualism, foster a confrontational environment that does not suit certain students, or merely reinforce a student?s existing beliefs. A variety of debate formats are described which address these criticisms including meeting-house, four-corner, fishbowl, think-pair-share, and role-play debates. Finally, issues related to the assessment of in-class debates are addressed such as whether the students are assessed individually or as a team, what aspects of the debate are assessed, and whether the instructor and/or students will do the assessment.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 34
Abstract: This paper reports on evaluation of a scheme to improve University teaching through action research over a five-year period in the science, engineering, and technology division of a large Australian dual sector University. Between 2002 to 2006 this scheme directly committed approximately A$210,000 in grants and involved over 130 teaching and other staff in sponsoring projects of up to eight months? duration, with a total of 34 projects completed. Evaluation was informed by the desire of the academic developers concerned with the scheme to engage more widely with staff in predominantly empirical disciplinary cultures, to be more accountable within a University business management paradigm, and to contribute to the scholarship of academic development. The paper provides evidence ? in terms of quality, effectiveness, practicality, participation, and satisfaction ? to show how this scheme enhanced the scholarship of teaching and learning in the University. The paper outlines issues encountered and further work to be done in undertaking evaluation of such a scheme.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 35
2005 - Instruction Article
Lim, C., Coalter, T.
Views: 3977       [51]
Abstract: Most research in academic dishonesty focuses on why cheating is an epidemic in educational institutions, why students commit dishonest acts, and what can be done to curtail dishonesty in the classroom. Very little research focuses on what instructors have to endure when they charge students with academic dishonesty. This paper offers insights into actual cases of academic dishonesty, the process, the appeal, the result of each infraction, and why instructors might be reluctant to report incidents. Furthermore, this paper offers guidelines that can help prepare anyone who is serious about upholding academic integrity.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 36
2006 - Research Article
Boyle-Baise, M., Brown, R., Hsu, M., Jones, D., Prakash, A., Rausch, M., Vitols, S., Wahlquist, Z.
Views: 3844       [70]
Abstract: Presently, service learning is utilized as a tool for learning about something other than service, such as: gaining civic dispositions, learning subject matter, practicing inquiry techniques, or questioning inequality. What might happen if, instead, an exploration of service itself grounded classroom studies and field work, fostering explicit consideration and critique of ethics, standards, and distinctive forms of learning through work with others? In this paper, the idea of service learning is turned on its head and "learning service" is considered as a means of enabling the civic, particularly in regard to higher education.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 37
Abstract: The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of advance organizers and audio narrations used to complement animated instruction on tests measuring different educational objectives. One hundred forty-one participants were randomly assigned to five treatment groups, received their respective instructional presentation and completed four criterion measures. No statistically significant differences in achievement were found among the five treatment groups on each of the criterion measures indicating that the type of cognitive strategies employed to complement animation did not instigate deeper levels of information processing and were not effective in facilitating higher order learning outcomes. These results raised concerns about the usefulness of prior research related to advance organizers and audio narrations when the objective is to complement animated instruction to facilitate higher order learning objectives.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 38
2006 - Research Article
Ball, T., Wells, G.
Views: 3648       [116]
Abstract: Teaching a course entitled Introduction to Theories of Education requires that one practice what one is preaching. We describe an attempt to organize and provide undergraduates enrolled in an introductory course of 300+ students, with a viable, yet more collaborative and ?product-based? alternative to the familiar lecture and test format. This qualitative study considers various forms of feedback that were elicited from both students and the course teaching assistants regarding the learning outcomes facilitated or hindered by this alternative format. Our analysis offers insight into some important ways the particular learning activities promoted in this course design intersect with larger institutional norms that infuse organizations (like universities) with social value, and how students negotiate the university experience. Findings suggest that ?good students? spend considerable energy learning to conform to what they believe to be their instructors? expectations, often at the expense of learning-with-understanding. However, learning-with-understanding may also be encumbered by the ambiguity or uncertainty that accompanies the removal of clear and explicit expectations. Tentative suggestions are offered explaining why and how some students gained proficiency in goal-formation and metacognition while simultaneously overcoming a sense of ambiguity or uncertainty.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 39
2006 - Instruction Article
Berle, D.
Views: 3564       [65]
Abstract: Many colleges and universities have embraced service learning, but the enthusiasm of administrators often exceeds service-learning application at the classroom level. For a variety of reasons, educators hesitate to implement service learning in their courses. Understanding service learning as a pedagogical tool is the key. Both students and faculty need time to learn the strategies and practices of service learning in order to succeed. This paper discusses strategies for integrating service learning into a department-wide curriculum, using a sequence of horticulture courses as an example. By increasing the service-learning component with each successive course, teachers and students gain confidence in the method and therefore are more likely to have positive results in courses with a greater service-learning component.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 40
Abstract: Faculty learning communities (FLCs) provide their members with both information and support as they move toward utilizing digital technology tools, learn new skills, and share meaningful instructional practices. This paper emerges from the initial year of an FLC established in a large urban research university with a focus on integrating digital technology and instruction. Key aspects of an FLC are addressed, including the effectiveness of the FLC in reshaping the nature of member's engagement in the academy, the challenges and opportunities of creating an FLC, and the power of FLCs to enhance the way faculty learn about technology.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 41
Abstract: The purposes of this paper are to explore emerging technologies, engaged learning, and features and students of the Interaction Age and to identify connections across these three realms for future research and practice. We begin by highlighting those elements of the Interaction Age that suggest a shift in the affordances and applications of digital content. The Interaction Age, as an extension of the Information Age, distinguishes digital content as not just content accessed by students but as content around which they engage and construct knowledge in a social manner. Second, we review technologies emerging on college campuses as well as categorize and compare newer technologies including mobile learning, Augmented Reality, Virtual Reality, and ubiquitous learning. These technologies are among those at the leading edge of innovation and hold promise for educational application. However, in light of the Interaction Age, we argue that these technologies must contribute to student learning, and in particular, student engagement in learning. Thus, we present the outcomes of a literature review regarding engagement and engaged learning. Finally, we explore prominent connections between emerging technologies, engaged learning, and students and devices of the Interaction Age, offering examples of these linkages to stimulate future research and practice.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 42
2008 - Research Article
Dale, C.
Views: 3484       [284]
Abstract: Creativity is a term that has many interpretations yet is seen as crucial to the development of students in higher education. As part of a wider research project entitled "Podagogy" at the University of Wolverhampton, a number of individual projects were undertaken within the performing arts subjects. The focus of the projects was to explore the potential use of iPod technologies to support student learning. This article analyzes to what extent the instructors' use of the iPod can nurture creativity in learning and teaching. Using an interpretative approach, the research has found that the iPod is a powerful tool for developing creativity within the learning and teaching environment. In addition to identifying a number of factors that can be associated with the notion of creativity when using the iPod, the study also considers certain conditions that need to prevail in the wider institutional environment if iPods are to be adopted as a learning technology. The study also proposes a number of areas for future research.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 43
2005 - Instruction Article
Berk, R.
Views: 3473       [8]
Abstract: Twelve potential sources of evidence to measure teaching effectiveness are critically reviewed: (a) student ratings, (b) peer ratings, (c) self-evaluation, (d) videos, (e) student interviews, (f) alumni ratings, (g) employer ratings, (h) administrator ratings, (i) teaching scholarship, (j) teaching awards, (k) learning outcome measures, and (l) teaching portfolios. National standards are presented to guide the definition and measurement of effective teaching. A unified conceptualization of teaching effectiveness is proposed to use multiple sources of evidence, such as student ratings, peer ratings, and self-evaluation, to provide an accurate and reliable base for formative and summative decisions. Multiple sources build on the strengths of all sources, while compensating for the weaknesses in any single source. This triangulation of sources is recommended in view of the complexity of measuring the act of teaching and the variety of direct and indirect sources and tools used to produce the evidence.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 44
2006 - Instruction Article
Peters, T., McHugh, M., Sendall, P.
Views: 3457       [49]
Abstract: With businesses struggling for resources during economic downturns, traditional business student internships were becoming more difficult to develop. One business school extended its experiential learning opportunities with specific management projects in community small business, healthcare, education, and non-profit organizations. The on-campus service learning center provided project development, logistical support, and assessment for forty-five business students to participate in 38 on-site, Human Resource Management projects. Means and standard deviations for self-report, end-of-semester surveys were determined for six Likert-scale items that measured the students? satisfaction with the project experience, and percentages were calculated of students who indicated specific personal and intellectual benefits derived from the projects. Most students reported favorable experiences with these non-traditional learning sites. Student projects developed management career choice information through the on-site application of their practitioner skills. They also benefited from their classroom reflections and interactions in sharing their problems, insights, and outcomes among their classmates. Students indicated they felt increased self-confidence, more comfortable about entering the working world, and more awareness of the linkages between the business and community service worlds. Through service learning, students gained experience in leadership, scholarship, and citizenship to become better members of their communities despite an economic downturn.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 45
2006 - Research Article
Lomas, L., Kinchin, I.
Views: 3395       [118]
Abstract: This paper evaluates a peer observation of teaching scheme one year after its introduction in a United Kingdom (UK) university. In order to understand why the case study institution chose to implement peer observation, there is discussion of the national policies that have encouraged its use in the UK and the lessons learned from universities in the United States and Australia. A series of themes are identified which provide an analytical framework for the consideration of the responses of individual academics from some of the departments involved to the underlying principles, processes and practices of the scheme. The research demonstrates the importance of implementing peer observation sensitively, taking account of the organizational culture of the different departments and being fully aware of the anxieties and concerns of academic staff.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 46
Abstract: The population of students pursuing higher education is increasingly diverse. Research suggests, however, postsecondary instructional beliefs and practices have not evolved in ways that effectively respond to diverse students’ unique needs. This scholarly self-study examined the nature and impact of using differentiated instruction in an introductory-level graduate course comprised of students who varied significantly in terms of their levels of readiness, their interests, and their learning profiles. The findings suggest differentiation had a positive and meaningful impact on student learning. Students’ class performance and their reflections on the experience indicated that students were appropriately challenged and were able to find meaning and relevance in the course content and activities. Themes emerging from this study highlight the necessity for pedagogy that reflects college students’ (a) diverse ways of learning, (b) diverse interests, experiences, and goals, and (c) diverse personal circumstances. Insights gleaned from this investigation are offered and recommendations for future research are provided.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 47
Abstract: This paper will reflect on the pedagogical challenges facing French Business Schools in the implementation of e-learning initiatives. I will show that the top French Business Schools are not the main providers of e-learning in business education, as the task is mainly assigned to private companies or government-subsidized organizations. Some fragmented e-learning initiatives do exist but the usefulness of this technology to enhance the learning and teaching experience is often overlooked in a drive to provide e-learning at all costs. I will argue that e-learning development should be grounded in a comprehensive pedagogical framework. The various challenges facing educators will be analyzed, such as their epistemological beliefs, their roles as teachers, their ability to create a community of inquiry, and their ability to choose pertinent knowledge. In order to put learning on the agenda in French higher education and help the educator understand how students learn, a more detailed understanding of the generational characteristics of student cohorts, their epistemological beliefs and conceptions of learning, as well as their learning styles and preferences is advocated.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 48
2006 - Article
Butin, D.
Views: 3316       [117]
Abstract:

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 49
Abstract: This article argues that the service-learning field has been pursuing the wrong revolution. Namely, service learning has been envisioned as a transformative pedagogical practice and philosophical orientation that would change the fundamental policies and practices of the academy. However, its attempted institutionalization faces substantial barriers and positions service learning in an uncomfortable double-bind that ultimately co-opts and neutralizes its agenda. This article argues that a truly transformative agenda may be to create a parallel movement to develop an "academic home" for service learning within academic "community studies" programs. This "disciplining" of service learning is the truly revolutionary potential of institutionalizing service learning.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 50
2006 - Instruction Article
Brooke, S.
Views: 3282       [58]
Abstract: With increasing interest in online education, instructors must have a repertoire of tools available to promote the critical thinking skills of their students. This paper will present the case method as one pedagogical approach for teaching online courses. Example cases are provided. Pedagogical approaches to working with new and seasoned online students are addressed. Further, the benefits of using the case method to promote learning in the virtual classroom are explained. The case studies presented for online classes present concrete situations that can be used to stimulate analysis, requiring students to project how they might respond to a set of circumstances. Case studies promote Socratic dialogue and higher order thinking skills. Further, the case method can be a good vehicle for stimulating students? thought about step-by-step planning.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 51
2006 - Instruction Article
Griffith, J., Hart, C., Goodling, M.
Views: 3279       [103]
Abstract: Grant writing experience can be a valuable asset for students completing masters-level degree programs across a variety of disciplines. A service learning grant writing project was incorporated in a multidisciplinary program evaluation course as part of a writing requirement. Twelve students served as ?ghost writers? and wrote grant proposals to foundations for community organizations. Projects were assessed by ratings provided by faculty across departments who served as judges. Qualitative data was collected from students and organizational sponsors that showed high levels of satisfaction from both groups and an awareness of reciprocity of benefit from service learning were observed in both groups. Benefits and limitations of the pedagogical technique are discussed.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 52
Abstract: A qualitative study of the pedagogical practices of the female faculty in a higher education program preparing college administrators revealed some of the reasons why female faculty choose their pedagogies. Surveys and interviews were used to determine what strategies faculty might have knowledge of and use in the classroom, as well as faculty members’ experiences in professional preparation programs, and their selection of instructional pedagogies. Among the influences on choice of pedagogies were perceptions of faculty and student roles in the learning experience, promotion of student learning, role of assessment, and prior educational experiences. Findings indicated that faculty did not necessarily teach in the manner in which they were taught and that faculty valued collaborative approaches and empowerment of the student in the learning process.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 53
2007 - Instruction Article
Beacham, C., Shambaugh, N.
Views: 3167       [240]
Abstract: Designing a course requires that the teacher pays attention to both the context and the content of the course, implementing an appropriate teaching strategy to keep students interested while they learn. Advocacy provides students with opportunities to apply what they know to a compelling human need, sharpens student engagement, and situates content to be learned within a human context. Problem-based learning (PBL) provides a method to structure tasks that are engaging and relevant to students, encouraging increased learning and commitment to the task. Two cases using advocacy as a teaching strategy and learning outcome and PBL as a guide for task structure are described in terms of course design, student learning, and revisions. Successes and challenges are discussed, and guidelines for implementing advocacy as a teaching strategy are suggested in terms of course design, implementation, and revision.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 54
2007 - Research Article
Ozturgut, O.
Views: 3152       [230]
Abstract: Having closed its door to Western ideas for centuries, China has always presented itself as a puzzle both for academicians and politicians. Westerners, though, have always been attracted by the natural resources and human power that China offers to the capitalistic world. This study explores the entrance of Western ideas in China from an educational perspective. The researcher spent 2005-2006 in China researching a Sino-U.S. Joint venture campus, exploring the academic challenges when teaching Chinese students. While being independent learners, Chinese students maintained their cultural roots and were proud of their long historical and cultural background. Chinese students were receptive and appreciative of American education, and Western capitalistic ideas did not cause any concern among the students.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 55
Abstract: The present study was conducted to determine the effects of students’ perception of both teacher support and students’ reaction to questioning on the instrumental help-seeking strategy used by students. The researchers also examined the relationships between these three variables and the motivational components of achievement goal theory. A self-report questionnaire was administered to 1558 undergraduate university students, and structural equation modeling (SEM) was used to explore relations between the variables. Overall, the fit of the base model was reasonably good. Results indicate that perception of teacher reaction had a direct and positive effect on students’ instrumental help seeking, as well as indirect and positive effects on self-efficacy, and task value. Perception of teacher support had an indirect, positive effect on task value. Furthermore, results revealed that motivational components have important mediating effects on instrumental help- seeking.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 56
2006 - Instruction Article
Parchoma, G.
Views: 3067       [107]
Abstract: In this article, Lewin?s (1951) social field theory is used as a framework for analyzing the potential for implementing scalable and sustainable e-learning initiatives in the academy. Powerful external economic and social forces coming to bear on academic leadership decisions are considered. The impacts of the emergence of the global learning society, knowledge economy, and information technology paradigm are explored. Five social forces?postmodernism, the interpretive turn, identity politics, globalization, and the post-colonial critique (Lincoln, 2001)?are examined. Existing and emergent pressures, exerted by both external and internal socioeconomic forces, are analyzed for their potential to support or inhibit adoption of e-learning initiatives into research, teaching, and learning activities. An e-learning policy field is posited.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 57
2007 - Instruction Article
Stefl-Mabry, J., Theroux, P., Radlick, M., Doane, W.
Views: 3024       [191]
Abstract: Collaborative problem-based courses can engage university students and faculty in more authentic, powerful, and meaningful learning experiences. For the past five years, the College of Computing and Information’s Department of Information Studies has been cultivating an educational partnership that brings together university students with their professional in-service counterparts in local K-12 school districts to explore issues of pedagogy, theory, curriculum, information literacy, technology, multimedia, and assessment. A capstone graduate course has evolved into a trans- generational learning collaboratory. The development and results of the course are discussed along with recommendations for others looking to engage in trans-generational pedagogy.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 58
Abstract: In higher education, students are required to develop complex cognitive capabilities that they may not have needed in their undergraduate work. While a plethora of resources is available to students of research, it seems that many students struggle to understand how to read, understand, integrate, and apply research and theory to a research question or hypothesis. To help my own masters and doctoral students develop these vital skills, as part of our initial doctoral foundation course I have developed a semester-long project grounded in theory and research from cognitive instruction that explicitly teaches and supports the objectives of (a) mastery of a research-supported knowledge base, and (b) development of conceptual tools to foster understanding, integration, and effective application of research. The process of this semester-long student project follows two basic threads: (a) to build a research knowledge base in the content area and (b) to develop student skill in reading. I have used this developmental process for six years to help graduate students build both abstract and applied competencies in reading, understanding, and applying research. It has been extremely successful, based on the students’ ability to use their newly developed competencies in more advanced endeavors, and their stated confidence to do so.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 59
2006 - Instruction Article
Murray, J.
Views: 2877       [47]
Abstract: This article presents an investigation into the meaning of ?learning? It uses cybernetics as a framework to look at the fundamental questions of: What is learning and why do people learn? Why do they learn this (and not something else)? How does learning happen? The article first describes the origin of cybernetics and its central tenets of circularity, feedback and communication, which suggest that learning is fundamentally about living. The living system learns as it fits with the environment in an integrated brain/body/environment learning system. This leads to a discussion of teaching and learning as building relationships with self and others in communication, with self and others, with or without the intention of changing and being changed in the encounter. Teacher and learner inevitably change (learn) as they interact whatever the context. The article suggests that what is happening in the encounter between teacher and learner, that which we call ?learning?, happens to each of us in the same way all of the time. Learning is change; change learning. ?Teacher? and ?Learner? change (learn) together in a constant feedback network of communication.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 60
2007 - Research Article
Borges, N., Hartung, P.
Views: 2828       [120]
Abstract: Although medical education has long recognized the importance of community service, most medical schools have not formally nor fully incorporated service learning into their curricula. To address this problem, we describe the initial design, development, implementation, and evaluation of a service-learning project within a first-year medical school course. Medical students (eight women, eight men) screened clients of a community agency for high blood pressure and educated them about the effects of hypertension on health. Results of the project indicated significant increases in students? attitudes, knowledge, and skills related to community health, resources, and service. Infusing medical education with service-learning activities can both meet community needs and enhance student education about the health of the public. The present findings support continued development and evaluation of service-learning projects within medical school training programs.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 61
2005 - Instruction Article
Meeus, W., Van Petegem, P., Van Looy, L.
Views: 2819       [27]
Abstract: The article distinguishes between four modes of implementation of portfolio in, and in relation to, higher education. These range from the use of portfolio in admissions to higher education, during the higher education course, on entry into the profession and for ongoing professional development. There is a tremendous diversity of portfolio types in use in higher education courses, which manifests itself in a large number of applications and classifications. A classification which we regard as worthy of universal acceptance is that which distinguishes between portfolios aimed at profession-specific competencies and portfolios aimed at learning competencies. In higher education portfolios aimed at profession-specific competencies yield a limited added value because they only provide supplementary information compared to other and better tools. Portfolio aimed at learning competencies adds genuine value in higher education if we want our graduates to be capable of continuing to learn on a life-long basis. The assessment of profession-specific competencies and learning competencies by means of portfolio by the same evaluator is to be strongly discouraged as it is highly prejudicial to the reliability of the reflections

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 62
2007 - Research Article
Bowering, M., Leggett, B., Harvey, M., Leng, H.
Views: 2803       [139]
Abstract: As the number of off-shore content-based courses presented by Western universities increases, the issue as to the suitability of elements of constructivist pedagogy arises. This paper reports on mainland Chinese student views of two different types of collaborative work conducted bilingually within a Master of Education program specializing in Educational Leadership. Despite the fact that the literature is divided on the appropriateness of such activity within Confucian-Heritage contexts, initial student evaluations voted the two group activities as the most valuable of all the course components. This encouraged the team to investigate the phenomenon by gathering both quantitative and qualitative evidence relating to the value, the organization and the contribution of individuals in each case. The extent and the nature of the generally positive responses are reported in the paper before a discussion reflecting on what the comparison of ?think, pair, share? with ?team activities? reveals for future courses. The conclusion is drawn that the study underscores confidence that group work can be very effective in such bilingual, content-based courses in China and elsewhere.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 63
Abstract: Teaching is a multidimensional, complex activity. The use of the Critical Incident Technique (CIT) has the potential to be effective in improving teaching as it reveals successful behaviors by identifying key actions associated between excellent/poor performances. The present study sought to identify teaching behaviors that differentiate excellent and very poor performance of undergraduate college teachers in India using CIT, from the perspective of students. Two hundred thirty-seven critical incidents were collected from 60 female students from three different undergraduate humanities courses using questionnaires and personal interviews. Qualitative procedures emphasizing the verbatims students generated were used for data analysis. The data generated from the incidents was subjected to content analysis, and sorted into 6 categories. The six categories identified were: rapport with students, course preparation and delivery, encouragement, fairness, spending time with students outside of class, and control. The frequency with which students reported each behavior as either good or bad is presented. The study yields specific behaviors for faculty to follow to yield improvement in teaching evaluations by students. A list of critical behaviors may have implications in selection, training and performance evaluation of teachers. The present study also underlines the robustness of CIT in education research.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 64
Abstract: The Virginia Tech Math Emporium is a large-scale, computer-based learning lab supporting courses designed following the emporium model (Twigg, 2003). In this article the authors discuss challenges and solutions faced between the years 1997 and 2006 involved with hiring, training, and evaluating the staff of instructional assistants working in the Math Emporium. The discussion is grounded in literature from the fields of training and peer tutoring. Directions for future methods of training instructional assistants are suggested.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 65
2008 - Research Article
Murphy, D., MacLaren, I., Flynn, S.
Views: 2766       [351]
Abstract: This study examines various aspects of an effective teaching evaluation system. In particular, reference is made to the potential of Fink’s (2008) four main dimensions of teaching as a summative evaluation model for effective teaching and learning. It is argued that these dimensions can be readily accommodated in a Teaching Portfolio process. The Teaching Portfolio initiative that is in use for the Postgraduate Certificate Programme in Teaching and Learning in Higher Education at the National University of Ireland Galway is a case in point. The challenges encountered when attempting to develop mechanisms for the summative evaluation of quality teaching are explored, as well as some of the possibilities for their resolution.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 66
Abstract: Since 1989, Cabrini College has integrated Community Service Learning (CSL) into its core curriculum. Like many early adopters of CSL, the non-traditional world of service learning has become an institutional tradition. In the past decade, CSL has widely expanded to the secondary and primary levels. However, as the CSL tradition expands, so does the use of the term "service learning". Community Based Research (CBR), once considered a "separate but equal" branch of CSL, is emerging as a more demanding pedagogy, teaching students to empower community members and alter social structures. Colleges with institutionally established CSL programs are well-prepared to take the next step into Community Based Research (CBR). They have an institutionalized knowledge of how to do CSL and have established strong community partnerships, elements essential to the success of any community-based program. For Cabrini and other early adopters, the revolution is complete. Now, evolution must take place if programming is to remain fresh, rigorous, and relevant to students and communities.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 67
2005 - Instruction Article
Zhu, E., Wright, M.
Views: 2758       [33]
Abstract: Colleges and universities face challenges when recruiting instructional technology (IT) specialists to assist faculty with instructional development, course and curricular redesign, and teaching innovations. Lack of clear standards for IT skills and knowledge impedes the effective recruitment of IT specialists for faculty development in higher education institutions. This article discusses the work of an IT specialist, analyzes the key IT skills and knowledge from IT position descriptions, and explains a search process that the Center for Research on Learning and Teaching (CRLT) at the University of Michigan uses to recruit qualified IT specialists and faculty developers.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 68
Abstract: This article examines current business communication education in higher education, particularly in regard to English as a global language. The discussion is situated at the intersection of business communication, intercultural communication, and internationalization of higher education, and the article draws on research from all three fields. The article questions why not enough use is being made of existing cultural diversity in university classrooms, and it suggests a variety of pedagogical strategies which will enable teachers to build on the cultural and linguistic strengths of their students to develop intercultural communication competence. These new directions for intercultural business communication will equip business graduates to operate successfully in a globalized world.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 69
2005 - Instruction Article
Poorsoltan, K.
Views: 2709       [9]
Abstract: An experiential program was performed in an undergraduate class of entrepreneurship during spring and fall 2004 consisting of three elements: Bugs, to generate ideas; (b) Networking, to connect with the local business community; and (c) Seed Money, to create a real-life startup exercise. The objective of this program was transferring the “load” of teaching from a conventional lecturing method to a series of practical assignments in which students had to generate business ideas, begin contacts with the local entrepreneurs, and actually start a business. These activities at the start appeared as detached and unrelated efforts. However, as the class progressed, these activities proved to be interconnected. Major results of this program were, (a) after three rounds of sieving and refining, students compiled an extended list of business ideas; (b) some of the local entrepreneurs, among whom many expressed their willingness to be guest speakers, established links with the students and the University; and (c) many students who had never experienced how a small proprietary business operates realized mechanics of starting and managing an enterprise.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 70
2009 - Instruction Article
Korsmo, J., Baker-Sennett, J., Nicholas, T.
Views: 2702       [633]
Abstract: One challenge experienced by many educators working in pre-professional programs involves designing courses to support students as they learn how to apply subject area knowledge to professional practice. This article describes a successful collaborative community-based project that contextualizes the often abstract and predominately linear theories of human development through the creation of life books for children in the foster care system. The learning activity includes upper division undergraduate Human Services students reviewing case files, contacting, interviewing, and meeting with members of the adoptive child’s families, researching the child’s medical background, and documenting the child’s life story to date. This method supports students’ understanding of human development within the context of the systems in which they will be working.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 71
2009 - Review Article
Shahabuddin, S.
Views: 2679       [641]
Abstract: Plagiarism sometimes creates legal and ethical problems for students and faculty. It can have serious consequences. Fortunately, there are ways to stop plagiarism. There are many tools available to detect plagiarism, e.g. using software for detecting submitted articles. Also, there are many ways to punish a plagiarist, e.g. banning plagiarists from submitting future articles for publication. In addition, scholarly journals should clearly state their policies regarding plagiarism and require authors to sign a statement indicating that their articles meet the requirements of original work. The reviewers should be supported by the journal’s board and editors when they report any occurrences of plagiarism.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 72
2009 - Instruction Article
Odom, S., Glenn, B., Sanner, S., Cannella, K.
Views: 2673       [481]
Abstract: The faculty of an undergraduate research course with a diverse student body recognized that many students struggled with the concept of how to critique a research article. The traditional assignment method used to teach the critique process did not maximize student learning outcomes. The active learning strategy of peer review was used to enhance student understanding and engagement in the critique process. This active learning strategy involved small groups of students who worked together as a team to evaluate the work of other student groups using a critique-rubric. This article describes the development and incorporation of a peer review activity into an undergraduate research course.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 73
Abstract: The offering of a graduate-level seminar at a major, public, North American university on the spiritual and moral dimensions of educational leadership provided the authors the unique opportunity to research the connections between higher education and spirituality, to determine the extent to which spiritual transformation might be possible within a secular institution. The study?s 17 student seminar members were challenged, through reframing exercises and case studies, to enter empathetically into the inner life of colleagues, their own students, supervisors and supervisees in order to experience a shift in consciousness, from the egocentric to the compassionate. Employing participant observation, interviews and term assignment analysis the researchers were able to document and account for significant incidents of personal and spiritual transformation, lying along a continuum from the epochal to the incremental (Mezirow & Associates, 2000). The data, then, lend themselves to the conclusion that spiritual transformation might not be incompatible with higher education?s traditional role of knowledge and skill transfer.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 74
2006 - Research Article
Aronson, K.
Views: 2588       [64]
Abstract: Prevention science, like service learning, is a relatively young field. However, in a short period of time, prevention has made significant progress in its scientific maturation, while SL research has lagged behind. Prevention science has made rapid progress because of its recognition of a multistage research cycle, reliance on interdisciplinary work, and success in developing strong university-community partnerships. Given the prevailing climate for accountability in education, SL researchers will need to increase the scientific rigor of their work. SL researchers should become more familiar with how prevention scientists conduct research. By following the lead of our prevention science colleagues and, where possible, teaming with them as interdisciplinary colleagues, SL researchers may move the field forward more rapidly.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 75
2007 - Research Article
Desrochers, M., Fink, H., Thomas, A., Kimmerling, J., Tung, W.
Views: 2573       [270]
Abstract: Alternatives to a solitary testing format can involve students working in teams to arrive at the correct answer. We compared two group assessment methods, cooperative and competitive, to a solitary testing approach. In most comparisons examining the undergraduate respondents’ (N=77) performance, the two group-testing methods were equivalent. Both group methods were superior to the solitary testing format in determining students’ knowledge of the course material and confidence in their answers. Moreover, rather than one person generating the team’s answer, most team members actively participated in the decision-making. The cooperative group surpassed the solitary testing group in terms of preference for their format of assessment.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 76
Abstract: The purpose of this article is to present a model of academic motivation that can be used by instructors to design courses that will engage students in learning. The model, based on research and theory, consists of five components that an instructor should consider when designing instruction: (1) empowerment, (2) usefulness, (3) success, (4) interest, and (5) caring. In this article, I describe the components of the model by discussing the key concepts of the components, summarizing the background research and theories that support the importance of the components, and providing questions, suggestions, and examples that instructors should consider when designing instruction. My hope is that novice, as well as experienced, instructors will find this model and the associated suggestions and examples useful as a reference tool to which they can refer when designing instruction.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 77
2010 - Instruction Article
Parkes, K., Kajder, S.
Views: 2560       [947]
Abstract: This paper focuses on the role of multimodal technologies in facilitating reflective processes and the subsequent assessment of reflectivity for students in pre-professional programs. Reflective practice has been established as a critical tool for developing identity in and on practice. This paper will focus firstly on reviewing salient literature about reflective practice and its use with pre-professional teachers. It will then report the processes and outcomes of the authors’ practices, as supported by the literature. Various reflective practices will be examined and explained. The role of the E-Portfolio (Electronic Portfolio) as the vehicle for housing student reflective practice will be briefly explored and the process for using author-developed rubrics for assessing levels of reflective practice will also be shared. Suggestions for replication in other disciplines, while being implicit, will also be made explicit.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 78
2011 - Research Article
Cox, A.
Views: 2551       [953]
Abstract: The last decade has seen a wave of new building across British universities, so that it would appear that despite the virtualization discourses around higher education, space still matters in learning. Yet studies of student experience of the physical space of the university are rather lacking. This paper explores the response of one group of students to learning spaces, including virtual ones, preferences for the location of independent study, and feelings about departmental buildings. It explores how factors such as the scale of higher education and management efficiency tend to produce rather depersonalized and regimented environments that in turn are likely to produce surface engagement. Responses of hospitality, criticality, and solidarity are briefly explored.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 79
Abstract: This paper discusses Transforming Communities, a course about the interaction of public policy and community issues that includes service learning, along with other assignments designed to promote student understanding of issues critical to communities. The paper first addresses the roots and underlying principles of the Transforming Communities Program, with a focus on the Seminar. It describes how the academic content and community-based learning assignments work together to provide an interdisciplinary education about communities, with the overall objective of understanding how communities function and the means of strengthening them. It shows how the academic and experiential components of the course are incorporated into the larger picture of Transforming Communities. It concludes with a discussion of the program's accomplishments, while at the same time pointing out challenges that the course and others like it must address.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 80
Abstract: This article problemetizes the contemporary view of reciprocity and offers a philosophical foundation for an enriched view based on Dewey's critique of early stimulus-response theory in psychology and his view of democracy. We situate the argument for reconsidering the provider/recipient model of service learning in the context of a collaboration between a university and school serving children 5-9 years old while implementing an after-school tutoring program. We develop and describe the traditional and enriched models of reciprocity and create a vision for the future establishment of similar collaborations.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 81
2007 - Research Article
Noonan, M., Black, R., Ballinger, R.
Views: 2421       [239]
Abstract: Mentoring has long been recognized as an effective strategy for retaining and supporting doctoral students in their programs of study. In this qualitative investigation, we conducted three focus groups of protégés, peer mentors, and faculty mentors to explore definitions, experiences, and expectations of mentoring. Results indicated that the three groups had meaningful differences in all three areas of interest. These differences were consistent with emerging conceptual frameworks explaining adult learning processes and perceived needs. The frameworks involved “stages” of mentoring and classifying the student’s preferred mentoring style along dimensions of pedagogy and andragogy. These frameworks suggest the need for clarifying protégé and mentor roles/expectations early and throughout the doctoral program.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 82
2007 - Instruction Article
Zahn, G., Sandell, E., Lindsay, C.
Views: 2359       [291]
Abstract: Teacher education programs require attention to the rapid changes in the world, in part because populations are becoming increasingly diverse. These rapidly changing classroom environments have prompted a need to train teachers who can communicate with and teach students from increasingly diverse backgrounds. In addition, they must have an understanding of cultural family values and practices which influence individual students among the various ethnic populations they teach. This paper will describe steps taken by one College of Education to create international partnerships and learning experiences in an effort to enhance their teacher training programs and develop an environment of global-mindedness.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 83
2007 - Research Article
Byers, C.
Views: 2293       [148]
Abstract: Instructional games have become an established factor in corporate and government training, and they are beginning to appear to a greater extent in educational institutions. As a result, courses on instructional game development are being incorporated into educational programs. Students in these courses find themselves faced with the task of confronting, understanding, and internalizing concepts that they have never before encountered. This article reports the practice and result of using games in one such course, and uses student commentary to support the conclusion that the games used were successful in reducing anxiety, increasing motivation, and improving understanding.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 84
2007 - Instruction Article
Whiteside, U., Pantalone, D., Hunter, D., Eland, J., Kleiber, B., Larimer, M.
Views: 2280       [280]
Abstract: Undergraduate students attending large research universities often have the opportunity to participate in the design, conduct, analysis, and dissemination of research initiated by faculty, postdoctoral fellows, and graduate students. To date, guidelines for the conduct of this specific type of relationship – that of an academic researcher to an undergraduate research volunteer in a large team- based research laboratory – remain absent from the peer-reviewed education literature. The Boyer Commission on Educating Undergraduates in the Research University recently called for further integration and depth of experience for undergraduates into the research process. Although not impossible, in order for large research universities to respond, it is necessary to act in a strategic and well-planned manner. Included are specific suggestions for success in facilitating this relationship within the context of a large, research-oriented university department.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 85
Abstract: This article describes a pilot project carried out at City University London, Department of Language and Communication Science, where adult service users with learning disabilities trained first-year speech and language therapy students. The training involved presentations by the service users on their involvement in interviewing support staff, work experience, and daily routines. All service users employed their preferred communication mode when presenting. The purpose of this project was to evaluate the students’ perceptions of the benefits of the training for them as future practitioners as well as developing their own disability awareness. Twenty-four students took part in the training, and 13 students completed an evaluation questionnaire. The feedback from students was generally positive with a range of comments around how they valued the experience in terms of developing knowledge and insight as well as challenging their own perceptions of disability. In addition, service users were asked to evaluate their own achievements in relation to the experience of teaching students.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 86
Abstract: Narrative inquiry was utilized to allow undergraduate students involved in an undergraduate research course to narrate their experiences in their research undertakings under the guidance of their respective mentors. A total of four focus groups representing the Bachelor of Arts and Letters, Bachelor of Commerce, Bachelor of Secondary Education, and Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy were interviewed. The present study describes the research experiences of a select group of undergraduate students who had defended their research outputs. The findings reveal that undergraduate students who were under competent, motivating, and supportive research mentors undertook the rigorous research process and experienced various activities and mixed feelings in the following stages: Groping, Developing, and Accomplishing. Only a few teams disseminated their outputs in refereed journals, educational conferences, and/or public poster exhibits.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 87
2007 - Instruction Article
Hugg, R., Wurdinger, S.
Views: 2264       [210]
Abstract: This article explores the use of a new teaching and learning model that incorporates diverse progressive teaching methods to create an innovative tool for educators. The Partnership For Learning Model (PFLM), was created specifically for service learning students, community partners, and faculty with a carefully choreographed series of classroom exercises This model, along with its corresponding exercises and assignments, may be applied to a wide range of professional, academic courses that will enhance student's life skills and provide real world benefits for the communities where it is used.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 88
Abstract: Science instructors have long known that the use of discrepant events with unexpected outcomes is a powerful method of activating thinking. A discrepant teaching event is similar to a discrepant science event in that it vividly portrays what is often an abstract construct or concept and has an unexpected outcome. The unexpected outcome creates what Piaget (1971) refers to as disequilibrium, thereby uncovering students’ naïve conceptions and tacit beliefs about the concept being studied. This article defines what a discrepant teaching event is and compares and contrasts discrepant science events and discrepant teaching events. Examples of discrepant teaching events useful in mathematics and social studies are also provided. The article concludes with a discussion of the utilization of an “inquiry stance” to teaching as a way to address students’ misconceptions of discipline specific concepts.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 89
Abstract: This study investigates how learning to become a ?researching professional? (Bourner, Bowden, & Laing, 2000) is understood by students undertaking a professional Doctorate of Education in one university in the United Kingdom (U.K.). This research is apposite given the present context for doctoral education both internationally and in the U.K. However, a literature review shows this is a relatively under-explored area. The study was designed within a phenomenological and descriptive/interpretive paradigm using case study methodology. Data was collected using semi-structured interviews with 12 students. The analysis was guided by research in other disciplines within higher education which has revealed qualitatively different conceptions of student learning. In this study, three ways of understanding learning to become a ?researching professional? were identified: conformity, capability, and becoming and being. Each is characterized by an internal relationship between how the learning context, research, and professional identity are understood. Each of these ways of understanding is discussed in relation to the literature. The complexity of professional learning at the highest level for students who are ?on the cusp? between the university, the work context, and the profession is highlighted. Although no generalizations are made from this study, it may be useful to others in similar contexts as it highlights implications for university tutors regarding student learning.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 90
2008 - Instruction Article
McVey, M.
Views: 2238       [365]
Abstract: Providing effective feedback on writing is a challenge in any learning environment, but it is even more problematic in fully online instruction. The lack of face-to-face interaction in web-based classes increases the need for highly transparent, prompt, and personalized feedback. Student views on the use of a semi-structured template combined with the "inking" feature of a Tablet PC for feedback on writing in an online course are reported. Survey results indicated the procedure was seen as providing clear and focused feedback with a highly personal touch. Students also reported being able to use the feedback to improve their performance on later writing assignments. Overall, this appears to be a well-received and helpful method for giving writing feedback to students in online classes.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 91
2009 - Instruction Article
Wrenn, J.
Views: 2197       [727]
Abstract: Educators in professional degree programs are charged with multiple responsibilities in the classroom and in practice settings. We apply our professional knowledge in a variety of settings to serve our communities; we reflect on how to improve practice from our experiences in these settings; we observe our students engaging in learning experiences in the classroom; and we share with our students the knowledge we’ve gained from our experiences and our scholarship within our profession. To accomplish these actions we must serve as both teacher and learner in both classroom and field. Moreover, we want our students to also benefit from the active learning processes of applying, reflecting, sharing, and observing both in and out of the classroom while also functioning as both learners and teachers. Although we can accomplish all these goals over an entire curriculum, this article seeks to provide an example of one teacher’s attempt to achieve these goals within a single Social Work course in Death and Grief. A model is provided that demonstrates how the interactive process works for both the teacher and students in this course and could be adapted for use in other courses incorporating practice settings as part of the curricula.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 92
Abstract: Why do science education programs target particular preservice teacher year levels? Using a 35-item survey, responses from 127 second-year preservice teachers were compared with 164 third-year preservice teachers from the same university within the same year entering the same science education course. The survey, which was linked to the course outcomes and multiple indicators, measured the preservice teachers? perceptions of their prior knowledge before involvement in a primary science education course. Examining the differences between the two cohorts (i.e., n=127 and n=164), results indicated statistically significant t-test scores for each of the four constructs (i.e., Theory [t=6.07], Children?s Development [t=7.85], Planning [t=10.31], Implementation [t=11.10]; p<.001) in favor of the third-year cohort. It is argued that each and every cohort of preservice teachers will have different levels of prior knowledge for learning how to teach primary science, hence, a needs analysis can provide evidence for targeting specific and collective needs of course participants. Further research is required for articulating a theoretical rationale for targeting particular cohorts in primary science education.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 93
2008 - Research Article
Foulger, T., Williams, M., Wetzel, K.
Views: 2073       [405]
Abstract: Pre-service teachers faced an old problem with new possible solutions by working collaboratively to learn new technologies and changed the way they react to new tools. This approach required students to explore technologies independent of instructors - with peers in small groups. Instructors believe the learning activities implemented in this project to facilitate learning new technology are better aligned with professional development realities of their students’ future profession. The old problem with the "inability to keep up with all the new technologies" and the new teaching strategy of "collaborative learning communities" prompted the development of the Innovations Mini-Teach course project. Through focus groups, an end-of-semester course effectiveness survey, and analysis of students' final products, this study showed that collaboration can be a superior method for helping pre-service students independently learn about the innovative technology tools that may be helpful to them as teachers, explore a professional development model that could support them in their future teaching careers, and most importantly see themselves as future innovators. Finally, students in focus groups indicated their class wiki, which archived each group’s consequential knowledge, would continue to support them to become teacher-leaders of technology integration.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 94
2007 - Instruction Article
Davis, J.
Views: 2071       [195]
Abstract: Large lecture sections are a necessary and often valuable component of the college or university curriculum; however, many educators are frustrated by the impersonal nature of such classes and the potential ineffectiveness of their lecture presentations. Examining the theatrical concepts of dialogue, monologue and soliloquy provides teachers with a conceptual platform from which to evaluate their own modes of communication while also encouraging a mindset that promotes a more personal and productive environment in their classrooms.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 95
2007 - Research Article
Jones, J.
Views: 2038       [256]
Abstract: This qualitative research study explored the experiences of students who had attended a co-operative (co-op) education program, with a focus on what makes the experience meaningful to them. Utilizing a basic interpretive research design, students who graduated from a co-op program were interviewed using an open-ended interview protocol. Both male and female students were selected based on graduation date and came from a wide range of program types. Findings for this study were examined through the lens of connected-learning, a learning method that places emphasis on discussion, collaboration, and acceptance for knowledge development. Several themes emerged including experience, relationships, time, fees, and luck. Findings suggest that co-operative education is beneficial, but it is made meaningful by more than securing paid work terms.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 96
Abstract: When students are involved in a classroom activity designed to promote the learning of specific concepts, it is more likely they will understand and retain these concepts when they engage emotionally in the learning experience. The difficulty for teachers involved in higher education is how to engage students in their learning in an emotionally challenging way while maintaining a classroom environment in which students feel safe. In the following instructional paper, the use of role-play as a pedagogical approach for enhancing learning through emotional engagement will be discussed. The paper highlights how the author makes use of role-play to provide genuine emotional challenges for students in a tertiary setting while still providing a safe learning environment.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 97
2008 - Instruction Article
Nolan, R., Rocco, T.
Views: 2018       [326]
Abstract: Writing requires reflective thinking that takes time. Yet, our technological society has speeded up the pace of our everyday lived experience. This article describes a systematic method developed by two tenured faculty at geographically distant universities to demystify the process of professional academic writing. Using action research as method, the authors have devised steps to help graduate students begin to slow their hectic pace of life and to critically reflect on the writing process itself as a necessary step in the art of writing for publication. Their method of teaching professional writing for publication has resulted in students’ work being successfully published.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 98
2007 - Instruction Article
Anderson, J., Applegarth, E.
Views: 1945       [236]
Abstract: The growing fascination and popularity of robotics and artificial intelligence (AI) is observed culturally from Hollywood movies to popular magazines, comic books, and even novels. This article describes an innovative assignment created for a General Psychology course at a small pharmacy college. This assignment is based on current robotic ideology calling for the creation of a PowerPoint robot of the humanoid type that embodies the basic theories and concepts contained in a standard psychological description of a human being. Never before attempted in this course, the Robot Project is an original and innovative integration of interactive group learning, multimedia technology, and creativity used to enhance the learning of basic psychological principles.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 99
2008 - Research Article
Shawer, S., Gilmore, D., Banks-Joseph, S.
Views: 1901       [318]
Abstract: This qualitative study examines the learner-directed motives that cause English as a Foreign Language (EFL) teachers to approach curriculum differently, as curriculum-transmitters, curriculum-developers, or curriculum-makers. This study’s conceptual framework was grounded in teacher curriculum development, curriculum implementation, curriculum-making, student cognitive and affective change, and social constructivism. The study made use of the qualitative paradigm at the levels of ontology (multiple curriculum realities), epistemology (interaction with rather than detachment from respondents), and methodology (using idiographic methodology and instruments). The research design involved qualitative case studies (Yin, 1994) as the research strategy and general interviews, pre- and post-lesson interviews, group interviews, and participant observation. Grounded theory was the data analysis approach. Based on work with college students from various countries, the study concluded that learner-directed motives, particularly student schematic, affective, pragmatic, and subject-content needs had significantly driven EFL teachers to implement various curricula. Learner content styles were also found to have an impact on the ways teachers approach curriculum. The results indicated positive relationships between learner-directed motives and the teacher curriculum-developer and curriculum-maker’s approaches. In contrast, negative relationships between learner-directed motives and the teacher curriculum-transmitter’s approach were established. The study provides recommendations for curriculum development, teacher education and future research.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 100
2013 - Research Article
Samples, J., Copeland, S.
Views: 1897       [1516]
Abstract: The literature on teaching is replete with definitions and examples of good teaching. They include the traits and characteristics of the best instructors, teachers, and professors. In recent years, the literature included the impact of teaching on the student learner, thus coming full circle, from teacher to learner. The literature provides good information, but it is the experience of one’s peers that provides reliable and current information. Since 1998, over 1000 faculty, mostly engineering faculty, have considered 5 questions concerning good teaching. They have pair-shared the results, and those results have accumulated. Collectively they have defined good teaching: the methods, the results and measures, and the need for good teaching to ensure that classes and courses are successful. They have even discussed the definition and meaning of “successful.” They have assigned adjectives and phrases as exemplars for the best practices of instructors/teachers/professors. In 2006, in discussions with colleagues at a teaching and learning conference, the question arose about the possibility that all teachers think approximately the same way about teaching. In response to these musings researchers conducted a survey of a non-engineering comparison group of faculty from two liberal arts related institutions who were asked to comment on the same five questions concerning good teaching: 66 responses were obtained, and their results are listed and compared below. This paper presents the results of the discussions and the survey on good teaching. It ties the results of faculty discussions and the survey with the literature and the voices of students who have discussed good teaching with educational psychologists. It shows that the fundamentals of good teaching are simple and attainable by every faculty member, and it frames a few of the most important traits and characteristics that the best instructors, teachers, and professors possess.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 101
Abstract: This 14-week qualitative study investigated the use of exit slips in two literacy courses in the college of education at a public university in the Midwest of the United States. A group of 44 undergraduate and graduate students participated. These students included pre-service teachers who are developing their understanding of what counts as effective literacy practice and in-service teachers who are interested in improving their existing practices. The main focus of this study was to examine how exit slips supported students in two teacher education courses. Data included 608 exit slips and student feedback shared in class about exit slip use. This paper reports on how exit slip writing during class encouraged reflective thinking about teaching as a profession. Specifically, this paper examines eight different reflections students made that point to growth in content knowledge and a sense of self as practitioner and learner. It is contended that exit slips can help students identify, develop, and articulate their beliefs about teaching and learning, resulting in giving pre-service and practicing teachers an edge in improving their curricular practices. It is also contended that the positive effect of exit slips points to uses in higher education classrooms in general.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 102
2019 - Instruction Article
O'Hara, L., Lower, L., Mulvihill, T.
Views: 1862       [3351]
Abstract: In universities all over the world, academics are compelled to increase the quality and quantity of their own research while also attempting to mentor a new generation of scholars. In this work we explore literature surrounding significant issues in higher education affecting faculty mentors of graduate students who are themselves engaged in the publishing process. In light of this literature, we propose a spectrum of approaches for mentoring graduate scholars in ways that are professionally meaningful and manageable for faculty mentors.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 103
Abstract: A typical college classroom is often pictured with the professor talking for several hours while students frantically try to write down everything that is said. This type of classroom has traditionally produced surface learning and has done little to promote learning that lasts. Do university classrooms have to be professor driven? Can university classrooms become engaging and facilitate student learning? What does a learner-centered classroom look like at the university level? The authors of this paper will explore effective strategies for making this shift to learner-centered university classrooms. Strategies include the use of an essential question for a course, a taxonomy of comprehension for class discussion, and writing activities. Specific university classroom examples are included.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 104
2008 - Research Article
Wilkinson, J.
Views: 1850       [278]
Abstract: Cheating, plagiarism, and other forms of academic misconduct are a significant issue in higher education. In this study, the attitudes of academic staff and students in a 3 year undergraduate nursing program to various forms of academic misconduct were assessed and compared. Forty- nine percent of staff and 39% of students thought that cheating on assessment tasks was common with “copying a few paragraphs and not citing the source” the most common form. Differences existed in beliefs about why cheating occurred with staff endorsing the view that students lacked an understanding of the rules. Students, on the other hand, felt that wanting a better grade and having too many assessment items were strong motivators for cheating. Students also tended to favor “lighter sentences” (e.g., warnings, resubmission) as penalties for plagiarism. This study has shown that while staff and students have similar overall perceptions about cheating and plagiarism there are areas where the differences in perception may be contributing to mixed messages about the seriousness of various cheating behaviors.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 105
2009 - Research Article
Allan, J., Clarke, K., Jopling, M.
Views: 1850       [642]
Abstract: This article reports on a piece of research designed to explore students’ perceptions of what constitutes effective teaching in a modern UK university. Definitions of effectiveness, based on work in both the schools and university sectors, are explored and summarized into four domains: providing a supportive learning environment; having high expectations; scaffolding learning; and providing clear explanations. The research was undertaken with first year undergraduates studying education-related non-teacher training programs. Data gathered from three focus group interviews were developed into a 32 item Likert scale questionnaire completed by a sample of 80 students, 65 of whom participated in further focus group discussions. Consensus regarding ten factors that describe effective university teachers is posited. The article concludes by suggesting that notions of effectiveness are predicated less on university teachers having high academic expectations and more on the provision of a supportive environment in which teachers scaffold learning effectively and promote effective interaction with their students.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 106
Abstract: Multiculturally congruent classroom learning environments have remained elusive in United States higher education as colleges strive to recruit, retain, and educate an increasingly diverse population. Frustrations run high amongst domestic and international students of color who find collegiate classrooms in the United States difficult to negotiate and often pedagogically incongruent with their own ways of learning and interacting. This article offers findings from a qualitative research study of four professors identified as multiculturally empowering by minority and international students in their college. Results are derived from three qualitative methods of data collection including faculty interviews, student interviews, and classroom observations. Findings suggest six elemental dynamics necessary for college professors to develop and facilitate empowering multicultural learning communities: (a) climate of safety, (b) spirit of risk taking, (c) congruence, (d) reciprocal relationships and roles, (e) multiplicity, and (f) reciprocity. Implications for teaching in cross-cultural collegiate environments are included.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 107
Abstract: This study aimed at investigating the psychometric properties of two inventories for the measurement of learning style preferences in a Greek sample: Kolb’s (1985) Learning Style Inventory (LSI) and the Index of Learning Styles (ILS) by Felder & Soloman (1999). The inventories were administered in a total of 340 Greek university undergraduate students of different disciplines (education, psychology, and polytechnics) and primary school teachers. Regarding the LSI, our sample was found to strongly prefer the accommodative and the divergent learning style. Results indicated that in the Greek sample the LSI had a satisfactory reliability but its construct validity was weakly supported. No significant differences were found in relation to discipline, a finding that calls the discriminant validity of the inventory into question. Regarding the ILS, our sample showed a preference for the visual and the sensing learning style; its reliability was barely acceptable but the construct and the discriminant validity were well-supported. In conclusion, this study revealed psychometric weaknesses in both inventories suggesting that they could be used as a tool to encourage self-development of an individual within a discipline group, but not as a tool for grouping them according to given learning styles.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 108
2009 - Research Article
Rundle-Thiele, S., Kuhn, K.
Views: 1803       [636]
Abstract: The importance of constructively aligned curriculum is well understood in higher education. Based on the principles of constructive alignment, this research considers whether student perception of learning achievement measures can be used to gain insights into how course activities and pedagogy are assisting or hindering students in accomplishing course learning goals. Students in a Marketing Principles course were asked to complete a voluntary survey rating their own progress on the intended learning goals for the course. Student perceptions of learning achievement were correlated with actual student learning, as measured by grade, suggesting that student perceptions of learning achievement measures are suitable for higher educators. Student perception of learning achievement measures provide an alternate means to understand whether students are learning what was intended, which is particularly useful for educators faced with large classes and associated restrictions on assessment. Further, these measures enable educators to simultaneously gather evidence to document the impact of teaching innovations on student learning. Further implications for faculty and future research are offered.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 109
2010 - Instruction Article
Parkes, K.
Views: 1795       [829]
Abstract: The performing arts studio is a highly complex learning setting, and assessing student outcomes relative to reliable and valid standards has presented challenges to this teaching and learning method. Building from the general international higher education literature, this article illustrates details, processes, and solutions, drawing on performance assessment and studio research literature in the field of one-to-one, or applied, music teaching. The nature of musical performance assessment will be explained as an emerging tool embedded in the pedagogical methodology research literature of the applied studio learning setting. Implications are explored and suggestions are made for other disciplines in regards to both summative and formative performance assessment strategies.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 110
Abstract: The assignment of pre-class reading is a common practice in higher education. Typically, the purpose of this reading assignment is to expose students to background knowledge that will be useful in an upcoming class discussion or to introduce a topic that will be presented more directly by the instructor. However, numbers of undergraduates actually completing these assignments are very low (Ruscio, 2001). The purpose of this article is to describe a variety of reading/writing prompts that can be used to promote critical out-of-class reading by undergraduate students. Critical reading involves the art and science of analyzing and evaluating text while maintaining a view towards improving the nature of thought and one’s subsequent actions (Paul & Elder, 2008). The prompts are organized into six categories: (1) identification of problem or issue, (2) making connections, (3) interpretation of evidence, (4) challenging assumptions, (5) making applications, and (6) taking a different point-of-view. The specific context of how to use and assign these reading/writing prompts and the subsequent benefits from their use will also be discussed.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 111
2006 - Instruction Article
Silva, G., Maci, J., Mej?a-G?mez, M.
Views: 1756       [109]
Abstract: This paper describes a peer-mentoring program in a large language department. Experienced Teaching Associates (TAs) served as peer mentors to novice TAs, providing the type of individualized guidance that new TAs need. The peer mentoring model has several advantages over the supervision-only model, including one-on-one help, multiple classroom visits and meetings, and regular feedback on various aspects of teaching. The experience that TAs share at different levels, as teachers and as students, is also important and plays a positive role in a peer mentoring program. Even though the program described has been instituted in a language department, the model may be useful to departments in other disciplines that also employ a large number of TAs.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 112
2007 - Research Article
Zhou, G., Xu, J.
Views: 1730       [206]
Abstract: Gender differences have attracted attention in today?s educational research and practice. Very few studies, however, explore the gender differences in the use of technology in higher education. The authors conducted a study on technology adoption at a large Canadian university. One of its purposes was to inform our understanding of how gender matters in the process of technology adoption in post-secondary teaching. A survey was administered to all full-time faculty and sessional instructors. Results suggest that females were more likely to use student-centered pedagogical approaches in teaching than males. Females had lower confidence and less experience in the use of computers in teaching. They tended to learn how to use technology from others, whereas males were more likely to learn from their own experience. Based on these findings, the paper recommends that professional development for females should involve more showcases and interactions while training for males would be more appropriate when it provides many hands-on activities.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 113
2009 - Instruction Article
Schell, K., Ferguson, A., Hamoline, R., Shea, J., Thomas-MacLean, R.
Views: 1719       [639]
Abstract: There has been a lack of research done on in-class teaching and learning using visual methods. The purpose of this article is to demonstrate an enriched teaching and learning experience, facilitated by a Photovoice project, in an Advanced Methodology class where sociology graduate students were exposed to various social research methods and methodologies. Students were asked to take photographs that would represent a research interest or a lived experience based in their own social world. The article weaves four students and the professor’s experiences to document the impact the Photovoice project had on each of them. Through this process, it was found that Photovoice is a successful tool for conducting research, teaching students to think critically, and introducing students to a new medium to create knowledge. Students experienced what it is like to be a researcher and a participant in a qualitative research project and discovered the overwhelming potential visual methods have to inform society about lived experiences.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 114
Abstract: The main purpose of this study was to identify, categorize and rank the future research priorities and needs for mobile learning technologies. The key research inquiries were the following: (a) What are the major research issues and challenges identified by online workers for mobile learning technologies over the next ten years?, (b) What are the major research categories identified by online workers for mobile learning technologies over the next ten years?, (c) What are the major research priorities identified by online workers for mobile learning technologies over the next ten years?, and (d) What are the major research needs identified by online workers for mobile learning technologies over the next ten years?. A Delphi study was used to represent a constructive communication device among a group of experts. A total of 72 participants (24 female and 48 male) were selected for participation. These experts identified top research issues and challenges, categories, priorities, and needs for mobile learning technologies.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 115
Abstract: The goal of this paper is to examine how our personal pursuits—hobbies, activities, interests, and sports—can serve as a metaphor to reflect who we are in our teaching practice. This paper explores the notion that our favorite personal pursuits serve as metaphorical mirrors to reveal deeper assumptions we hold about the skills, values, and actions we encourage, recognize, and reward in our classrooms. The paper has four principle objectives: first, to understand the importance of identifying the skills, values, and actions that form our basic assumptions of knowing in our personal pursuits and teaching practices; second, to appreciate the importance of reflection on experience as an epistemology for self-knowledge and for developing in our teaching practices; third, to understand the power of metaphors to enhance our ability to see previously unavailable and therefore unexamined assumptions; and fourth, to examine and challenge for validity, through dialogue, our assumptions to improve our teaching practices. In addition, in this article we offer a metaphorical mirror exercise designed to help facilitate application of personal pursuits through reflection and dialogue to one’s teaching practice.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 116
Abstract: The number of students studying abroad is continuing to grow, which allows for intercultural learning to take place while forming cross-cultural relationships. This intercultural understanding plays a vital role as businesses begin operating in the global marketplace where cross-cultural relationships and understanding are needed. International students bring differing cultural experiences, expectations, and learning styles to the higher education classroom that allow for new perspectives to be introduced. How can faculty effectively leverage this cultural diversity in the classroom while addressing the academic needs of both the host and international students? Through effective teaching practices in a globalized classroom and an awareness of the cultural diversity present in the classroom, faculty members can provide learning opportunities, both academic and socially, that meets the needs of host and international students while preparing them for effective interactions in a globalized society.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 117
2011 - Instruction Article
Brown Wright, G.
Views: 1653       [834]
Abstract: In her book, Learner-Centered Teaching, Maryellen Weimer contrasts the practices of teachercentered college teaching and student-centered college teaching in terms of (1) the balance of power in the classroom, (2) the function of the course content, (3) the role of the teacher versus the role of the student, (4) the responsibility of learning, (5) the purpose and processes of evaluation. She then gives some suggestions on how to implement the learner-centered approach. Using Weimer’s five specifications, it has been possible to identify from the pedagogical literature several examples where college teachers are seeking to move toward more student-centered classrooms. This essay reports on innovations used by teachers across the academic and professional spectrum, as well as on their evaluations of their successes.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 118
2010 - Instruction Article
Campbell, C., Henning, M.
Views: 1651       [713]
Abstract: This paper describes an innovative teaching collaboration between two university professors to prepare undergraduate preservice teachers for planning, designing, and assessing interdisciplinary curriculum. Specifically, we were interested in whether deliberate efforts to integrate social studies and assessment methods courses would facilitate our students’ learning compared to when such courses are taught in isolation (traditional instruction). Fifty-nine undergraduate elementary education preservice teachers served as participants. Approximately half received integrated instruction, the other half traditional instruction. In both instructional formats, preservice teachers were required to design and implement interdisciplinary units (i.e., lessons, assessments) during their clinical experience. Examination of interdisciplinary units revealed that preservice teachers receiving integrated instruction outperformed their nonintegrated coursework peers in developing, assessing, and reflecting on interdisciplinary content.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 119
Abstract: Many instructors teach courses that prepare students to do research individually or in teams. These instructors also supervise their students’ research projects. Continuous and systematic use of action research principles can help instructors prepare for problems that may develop when students encounter unfamiliar issues at research sites due to their lack of knowledge or to their own assumptions about the sites. Students may also encounter unanticipated difficulties in team collaborations. Action research principles include planning how and what to teach, implementing activities, observing them, reflecting on their efficacy, and then making changes in instructional practices.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 120
2009 - Instruction Article
Keebaugh, A., Darrow, L., Tan, D., Jamerson, H.
Views: 1618       [493]
Abstract: Previous research has highlighted the effectiveness of Problem-Based Learning (PBL) in multiple disciplinary settings, including medicine, teacher education, business, allied health, and the social sciences. Yet interdisciplinary educators have very little information about how to implement PBL in classrooms where multiple disciplines are represented. This paper offers practical strategies for the successful implementation of PBL in an interdisciplinary context in which learners have a limited knowledge base. In this paper we will a) highlight challenges to interdisciplinary teaching, b) demonstrate how PBL and traditional teaching techniques can be used in an interdisciplinary context, and c) discuss strategies to engage students in making scientific discoveries of their own.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 121
Abstract: “Theory? What does this have to do with anything we’re doing?” Sound familiar? Students may not always verbalize this, but they often think it, especially in courses where the emphasis is on the development of technical skills and the application of those skills to the building of products. Presenting theory in a way that is relevant and engaging can be challenging under these circumstances. This article describes how we addressed this challenge by involving students in an analysis of their “best learning experiences” stories, and then helped them apply their discoveries to the products they built.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 122
Abstract: A total of 575 students from the Associate Degree Foundation Program and the Associate Degree Program participated in this study. The two purposes of this study were to use the time series between/within experimental design to examine whether participation in co-curricular activities could (1) enhance student learning effectiveness and (2) have positive effects on the academic performance of self-funded sub-degree students in Hong Kong. It was found that participation in cocurricular activities could not enhance student learning effectiveness. Associate degree students were too preoccupied by the need to attain good academic results in the first 2-3 terms of study. Rather, this study suggests that student learning effectiveness is affected by the time factor. High learning effectiveness was observed in the middle of the academic year but relatively low learning effectiveness at the end of the year.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 123
Abstract: A collaborative teaching approach (CTA) between two instructors was implemented to develop more curricular coherence with the intents of reducing fragmentation and of stimulating learning across mathematics methods and instructional technology courses. The CTA was prompted by the need to streamline the learning outcomes, including an e-portfolio exit requirement for their program of study. Utilizing a case study approach to determine preservice teachers’ levels of satisfaction, the actual learning effects, and the significant factors in the CTA, we found them to express overall satisfaction with the learning outcomes of the collaboration, and they suggested extended implementation.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 124
Abstract: Through globalization, the world is becoming smaller, placing responsibility on the educational system to prepare tolerant, culturally empathetic learners. In response to this rising demand, students from a U.S. Midwestern university and another from St. Petersburg, Russia, met on a video bridge and learned intercultural communications by interculturally communicating. This paper examines how video-conferencing allowed American and Russian students on opposite ends of the earth to meet through technology to share each others’ beliefs, values, and world views, and to sample the elaborate, multidimensional, and pervasive cultures of their international counterparts.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 125
2013 - Research Article
Wittek, L., Habib, L.
Views: 1544       [1609]
Abstract: This article focuses on describing the interplay between teaching and learning practices in Higher Education and the disciplinary context of such practices. In particular, it aims to address the question of how course design, teaching, and learning activities take place within a particular academic culture and how those activities mutually shape each other. To do so, we propose to use the notion of mediating actants, a combination of Vygotsky’s (1978) notion of mediation with the concept of “actant” that is at the core of actor-network theory (ANT). We suggest that such a notion can be useful in understanding the processes of construction of teaching and learning within disciplinary discourses and practices. This article is based on an empirical study of three Master’s programs at a Scandinavian institution of higher education. Data was gathered using ethnography-inspired methods such as interviews, observations and document analysis. In our analysis we identified six elements as central in how quality teaching and learning are constituted within master’s programs: (1) the master’s thesis, (2) writing as a mode of thinking (3) the students’ learning environment, (4) the teaching process and teaching style, (5) the students’ conceptions of learning and their engagement, and (6) the processes of transformation from spontaneous to scientific concepts that the students undergo.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 126
2009 - Research Article
Mapuva, J.
Views: 1528       [696]
Abstract: ICTs have brought benefits to business as well as to Higher Education Institutions (HEIs), where an unprecedented demand for tertiary education has seen students enrolling for courses, some doing so through distance education. This has made the internet a very significant and indispensable teaching/learning, communication, and marketing tool for information dissemination for both education purposes and business transactions. The Internet possesses the propensity to change not only the way society retains and accesses knowledge but also to transform and restructure traditional models of higher education, particularly the delivery and interaction in and with course materials and associated resources. Universities have been faced with the daunting task of having to grapple with the inevitable change by re-adjusting and re-organising themselves in preparation for the incorporation of e-learning within their institutions. Institutional leaders have also been faced with the challenge of having to align their institutional objectives to meet the needs and demands of the e-learning demand. This article explores the central theme of attempts by HEIs in the South African context: to exert “attitudinal” changes in current “traditional” educational delivery practices by universities in order to fully utilize e-learning strategies for improved delivery of courses for its students.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 127
Abstract: The concept of critical thinking was featured in taxonomies a few decades ago. Critical thinking is a complex process that requires higher levels of cognitive skills in the processing of information. The teachers’ perceptions of critical thinking among students influence their behaviors in the classroom. It has been found that teachers perceive they are teaching critical thinking to their students and believe that critical thinking will provide the intellectual stimuli that will facilitate critical thinking. The evidence of critical thinking among students was perceived to be their ability to explain to ideas and concepts in their own words. However, the ability to think logically and solve problems using new approaches paraphrase is not an indication of the students’ higher-level cognitive skills but the process the student undertakes to gain understanding of the material presented. Teachers did not seem to understand the requirements needed to cultivate critical thinking among students. Although teachers perceive that they are encouraging critical thinking in the classroom, they are merely focusing on the comprehension of the subject matter.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 128
Abstract: The observation of teaching remains an integral process for the enhancement of practice as part of academic continuing professional development in higher education in the UK. This paper argues that failure to recognise the potential for peer-orientated development to reinforce restrictive norms of practice will be detrimental to the project of continuing professional development for learning and teaching. It is suggested that teaching observation schemes grounded in a peer model of observation within a reflective practitioner paradigm are potentially reinforcing parochial and performative constructions of teacher professionalism that ultimately enable resistance to changes to practice. It argues that for teaching observation to contribute to legitimate enhancement of teaching practice, such processes must be underpinned by pluralistic models of professional development that tolerate, and indeed require, critical differences of perspective that challenge rather than affirm the existing professional “self-concept” of experienced practitioners as it is enacted within current peer models of development in higher education.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 129
Abstract: The present study examined roles that perceived English fluency and sociocultural adaptation difficulty play in predicting self-efficacy beliefs for teaching in a sample of 119 international teaching assistants (ITAs) from East Asian countries of China, Japan, Korea and Taiwan. Results showed that a positive relationship between perceived English fluency and teaching self-efficacy was not apparent until the moderating influence of sociocultural adaptation difficulty was examined. More specifically, at high levels of adaptation difficulty, positive relations between English fluency and teaching self-efficacy were found; however, as sociocultural adaptation difficulty decreased, the effect of perceived fluency in English on efficacy decreased. Implications for ITA training as well as limitations of the study were discussed.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 130
2009 - Research Article
Weinstein, S., Wu, S.
Views: 1443       [679]
Abstract: This study compares the effectiveness of two different assessment techniques; readiness assessment tests (RATs) and frequent quizzing. We report student perceptions of the impact of these techniques on the number of readings done prior to the class period, thorough reading of assignments, ability to follow class discussions, ability to participate in class, ability to prepare for exams and exam scores. We also examined student’s overall preferences for assessment technique as well as how preferences varied by learning styles. Readiness assessment tests were generally better than frequent quizzes at encouraging students to do the readings prior to class, follow class discussions, and participate in class. A majority of students preferred readiness assessment tests to frequent quizzes. However, whereas global and/or intuitive learners preferred the readiness assessment tests, sequential and/or sensing learners preferred the quizzes.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 131
Abstract: The need to effectively prepare faculty to teach in a cross-cultural environment has become imperative in the context of globalizing higher education (Deardorff, 2009; Verbik, 2007). Many higher education institutions around the world have internationalized their degrees and programs, and they have established foreign branch campuses to provide their intellectual resources in other countries (Altbach, 2010; Armstrong, 2007). In this paradigm, faculty members are contracted from the home campus or from an outside organization to teach in the foreign branch, but they receive little formal preparation to teach in this type of environment (Lewin, 2008; McBurnie & Ziguras, 2007). Faculty members are unaware of culturally competent pedagogical strategies on how to respond in culturally sensitive ways, and thus they lack the ability to successfully communicate and work with learners from other cultures (Paige & Goode, 2009). This paper focuses on preparing faculty to teach cross-culturally at international branch campuses. Using Darla Deardorff’s process model of intercultural competency, I will develop a framework that focuses on three core elements of Deardorff’s process model—attitudes, knowledge and comprehension, and skills—that will help faculty members to teach internationally. In the paper’s conclusion, I will suggest best practices and discuss the implications of intercultural competency for transnational teaching.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 132
2009 - Instruction Article
Schlitz, S., O’Connor, M., Pang, Y., Stryker, D., Markell, S., Krupp, E., Byers, C., Jones, S., Redfern, A.
Views: 1420       [643]
Abstract: This article describes how a diverse, interdisciplinary team of faculty formed a topic-based faculty learning community. Following an introduction to faculty learning communities and a brief discussion of their benefit to faculty engaged in the process of adopting new technology, we explain how our team, through a competitive mini-grant application process and intensive training workshop, complemented by a series of follow-up training sessions, formed a faculty learning community that collectively adopted a web-based rubric model for performance evaluation, began implementing it, and, in doing so, developed a culture of assessment. We describe the web-based rubric software we adopted and provide short reports authored by seven members of the faculty learning community to exemplify how the implementation of web-based rubrics can enhance student performance, augment instructor evaluation of student performance, and facilitate outcomes assessment. The article includes a “lessons learned” section which synthesizes what we learned from the endeavor and emphasizes what we considered critical to the group’s success.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 133
2009 - Research Article
Hanusch, F., Obijiofor, L., Volcic, Z.
Views: 1410       [564]
Abstract: Attempts by universities to provide an improved learning environment to students have led to an increase in team-teaching approaches in higher education. While the definitions of team-teaching differ slightly, the benefits of team-teaching have been cited widely in the higher education literature. By tapping the specialist knowledge of a variety of staff members, students are exposed to current and emerging knowledge in different fields and topic areas; students are also able to understand concepts from a variety of viewpoints. However, while there is some evidence of the usefulness of team-teaching, there is patchy empirical support to underpin how well students appreciate and adapt to team-teaching approaches. This paper reports on the team-teaching approaches adopted in the delivery of an introductory journalism and communication course at the University of Queensland. The success of the approaches is examined against the background of quantitative and qualitative data. The study found that team-teaching is generally very well received by undergraduate students because they value the diverse expertise and teaching styles they are exposed to. Despite the positive feedback, students also complained about problems of continuity and cohesiveness.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 134
Abstract: This study examined the relationship between teacher written feedback and change in the disciplinary writing of tertiary students in their final year of undergraduate study. The student texts and teacher written feedback examined arose naturally out of a third year disciplinary-based unit in which each student submitted a text three times over the course of a semester, each time receiving feedback and a mark prior to rewriting and resubmitting. In analyzing the relationship between the different types of feedback and the changes that occurred, the feedback was categorized according to the issue that was being addressed, the manner in which it was given, and its scope. The different types of feedback were directly related to the changes that occurred in the students’ subsequent rewrites. The analysis shows that certain types of feedback are more strongly related to change than other types of feedback. In addition, the analysis shows that change is further influenced by the balance between the various individual points of feedback and the degree to which they reinforce each other. The findings show that the use of feedback that is strongly related to change can improve the writing of students in the disciplines.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 135
Abstract: This paper reviews the use of extended case studies as a teaching method to deeply engage students in the learning and understanding of policy theory. Discussion commences with a review of the literature on the use of case method as an approach to teaching and learning and then critiques the results of student surveys that questioned their opinions on the effectiveness of the case teaching method as experienced in their policy studies course. The analysis of the findings suggest that where a key course goal is to teach policy theory and enable students to use it as a tool to analyze practice, then at the undergraduate level, long structured case studies extended over a number of weeks are most effective. Engaging students in extended case studies helps them develop applied policy skills, an understanding of policy theory and greater capacity to apply theoretical concepts to assist in the analysis of real, everyday policy problems. This paper argues that extended case studies that involve students in the research and analysis of contemporary policy issues is an effective way of engaging students in course material and encourages deep learning.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 136
2008 - Instruction Article
Lalley, J., Gentile, J.
Views: 1355       [393]
Abstract: We examine the argument that teaching will be more effective if adapted to individuals -what we call the interaction/adaptation hypothesis. What is likely correct about this hypothesis (but needs more research) is that modality of instruction may need to be adapted to certain types of content (e.g., geometry vs. literature) or to domain of objectives (e.g., cognitive vs. psychomotor). What is also correct (and has much empirical support) is that instruction needs to be adapted to the learners' prior knowledge and experience vis-avis the material to be learned. What is incorrect is that instruction should be adapted to learners' styles. We describe some of the major historical conceptualizations of adapting to individual differences, including summaries of the empirical evidence on these approaches. Finally, we offer an alternative approach--namely adapting to individuals' prior knowledge.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 137
2008 - Research Article
Heaton Shrestha, C., May, S., Edirisingha, P., Linsey, T., Burke, L.
Views: 1345       [317]
Abstract: For many years, face-to-face peer mentoring has been a feature of learning support provided to first-year undergraduate students at one university in the UK. Building on the success of these initiatives, a scheme has been developed at this institution in which first-year undergraduates are mentored by second- and third-year students through a variety of media, both face-to-face and electronic. A research study was undertaken to evaluate the implementation of scheme, part of which involved undertaking a series of interviews with the e-mentors who participated over the course of two years. In presenting the findings, this paper discusses the commonalities that emerged and between face-to-face and e-mentoring; reflects on ways in which use of the electronic medium adds to the generic benefits of mentoring; shows that e-mentoring impacts differently on mentors and mentees; and highlights some of the particular challenges e-mentoring presents to mentors. The implications for the selection and training of mentors are discussed in the final section of the paper.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 138
2008 - Research Article
Monaghan, C., Columbaro, N.
Views: 1333       [561]
Abstract: The application of Communities of Practice (CofP) can potentially serve as an effective learning strategy for higher education classrooms by contributing to student professional development while fostering a desire for life-long learning. The purpose of this qualitative study was to assess the effectiveness of this learning strategy and help educators understand how integrating CofP experience in the higher education classroom can help students become more engaged in lifelong learning. Students involved in CofP during two different graduate courses provided their reflections on this learning strategy through their papers and journals. Findings indicated that, despite the often individualistic nature and constrained graduate course environment, participants felt that the use of CofP was beneficial for enhancing relationship skills and acquiring knowledge about topics of interest quickly and effectively.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 139
2010 - Research Article
Jebeile, S., Abeysekera, I.
Views: 1332       [752]
Abstract: This paper conveys the findings of a study conducted to evaluate the initiation of an interactive online computer-assisted learning module, called WEBLEARN, in an undergraduate introductory accounting course at an Australian university. The purpose was to aid students in the preparation of cash flow statements, a topic that from the student perspective is usually considered fairly difficult. Following the pilot of the module, student responses were collected via questionnaire in order to evaluate their perceptions regarding the WEBLEARN module. Diffusion of innovations theory was utilized as a framework for assessing student responses and to guide further development of modules in other topics within the accounting unit. The results proved to be significant in relation to all four independent variables: relative advantage, compatibility, ease of use, and result demonstrability. The combination of quantitative and qualitative findings indicates that the majority of students formed favourable perceptions regarding the relative advantage, compatibility, and ease of using the module, which further translated into positive intentions regarding prospective use of the module as a learning resource.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 140
2010 - Research Article
Marcketti, S., Kadolph, S.
Views: 1328       [733]
Abstract: Leadership beliefs contribute to behaviors and attitudes. The purposes for conducting this study were 1) to gain an understanding of undergraduate students’ leadership beliefs, 2) to implement three distinct leadership modules into an introductory textiles and clothing course, and 3) to assess the modules’ effectiveness in promoting empowering leadership beliefs. The study used quantitative and qualitative methods (n=76). Findings suggest undergraduates’ perceptions of leadership encompass trait and situational perspectives of leadership. The modules influenced students’ understanding of the varied definitions of leadership and empowered them to consider that the behaviors, beliefs, and attitudes of leadership were attainable.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 141
2016 - Research Article
Islim, O., Gurel Koybasi, N., Cagiltay, K.
Views: 1328       [2245]
Abstract: Open Educational Resources (OER) and OpenCourseWare (OCW) target barriers of education and learning by sharing knowledge for free to benefit self-learners, educators, and students. This study aims to investigate the use of OER both as a supplementary resource for a traditional course and as a resource for self-learners. First, the attitudes and perceptions of undergraduate students toward using a General Physics Laboratory OER and about how those resources contributed to the outcomes of the course were determined. Second, public usage of resources was assessed by analyzing OER access statistics. Resources were designed to encourage students to review experiments before laboratory sessions. Results indicated that students who used the OER experienced benefits to their learning processes. In line with their aim, the resources facilitated preparedness for the course. More than half of the respondents deemed supplementary resources unnecessary. On the other hand, self-motivated learners found, reviewed, and benefited from the resources.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 142
2015 - Research Article
McCallum, S., Schultz, J., Sellke, K., Spartz, J.
Views: 1302       [1880]
Abstract: Colleges and universities remain attentive to developing and supporting ways to foster student academic success. These efforts have taken on more importance as student success, commonly measured by student learning achievement, has failed to meet expectations. For colleges and universities, the flipped classroom represents a student-centered method of fostering academic involvement that is recognized as a positive contributor to student success. This exploratory study examined the flipped classroom’s influence on student academic, student peer-to-peer and student-faculty involvement. The study involved 60 undergraduate students (28 male, 32 female) from three flipped classrooms consisting of courses in mathematics and business. Focus group interviews were conducted to gather student feedback regarding their behaviors and classroom engagement. Additionally, a brief survey was administered to collect demographic information as well as quantitative data regarding student perceptions. Findings indicated student academic involvement was present through note taking, viewing video lectures, active in-class learning and collaboration. Students cited peer-to-peer and student-faculty engagement as essential to relationship building, peer learning, and meaningful involvement with faculty.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 143
2008 - Research Article
Lester, J., Evans, K.
Views: 1288       [451]
Abstract: Instructors often teach in isolation with very little collegial interaction guiding their practice. In light of the research that exists identifying the value of collaboration within learning environments, the merits of such isolated practice must be questioned. Even though collaboration within educational settings has been identified as critical to the development of both instructors and students, highly collaborative approaches to team teaching have not been fully explored. The purpose of this study was to examine our own experience as team teachers in a team taught, educational psychology course. Through a phenomenological analysis of our lived experiences as instructors engaged in collaboratively teaching an undergraduate course, we gained understanding of the benefits of team teaching within a broader context. A thematic structure emerged that captured our experience of the process of co-teaching. This shared thematic structure consisted of one ground theme, named we didn’t have a manual for this/finding our way through, and five themes, each providing insight into how we made sense of team teaching. The five emergent themes were (a) You can’t shoot from the hip; (b) Following and leading . . . all of us together; (c) If we walk away disagreeing, is it okay?; (d) The presence of another pushed us to go deeper; and (e) You build something bigger. Implications for the use of team teaching in higher education are also explored, highlighting the value of collaborative praxis.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 144
Abstract: This paper explores Malaysian students’ problems within their science and engineering tertiary courses in Japanese through their diary entries and semi-structured interviews. The study analyses how students implement management strategies to overcome their problems. Although many studies are available regarding students’ academic activities in a foreign language, few of those have reported upon foreign students’ academic experiences in Japanese science and engineering courses within their in-country program. The students predominantly had difficulties in writing experiment reports, understanding scientific concepts, and reading Chinese characters (kanji). Management strategies that they significantly employed to overcome their problems were peer cooperation and the use of internet resources. The paper discusses potential support that the program and the language course can provide for these students.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 145
2009 - Research Article
Raddon, M., Raby, R., Sharpe, E.
Views: 1278       [632]
Abstract: Challenged by some of the inherent difficulties in teaching qualitative data analysis, three instructors created an interactive digital learning object entitled “Sleuthing the Layered Text: Investigating Coding.” In this paper we assess the effectiveness of that learning object as a tool for teaching qualitative coding. On the face of it, learning objects—a form of instructional technology that has been criticized for tending to be objectivist and content-driven—would appear to be ill-suited for teaching qualitative analysis, an open-ended, interpretive and subjective process. However, based on student evaluations from two very different undergraduate courses, we found that the learning object did prove to be an effective medium for teaching coding. We attribute this success to its design, which incorporates best practices of classroom instructors, and also to the integration of the learning object into our courses. Nevertheless, student feedback cautions us that the learning object is not a technological fix. The degree to which students valued the learning object over other methods of instruction was moderate, and some were leery about this form of digital technology substituting for classroom teaching, even though this was not our intention.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 146
2010 - Research Article
Durgunoglu, A., Hughes, T.
Views: 1267       [663]
Abstract: This study focuses on self-efficacy, attitudes, perceived preparedness, and the knowledge of preservice teachers in the USA regarding isolated English Language Learners (ELLs) in high school classrooms. In the first study, 62 preservice teachers who were doing their student teaching completed a survey on: (a) their perceived preparation and self-efficacy regarding ELL students, (b) their attitudes towards ELL students in mainstream classrooms and their parents. They also completed an ELL knowledge test. In Study 2, several high school classrooms that included a few ELLs were observed to determine what these students experienced in a mainstream classroom and how the preservice teachers interacted with them. Four Caucasian female pre-service teachers from Study 1 were observed. Results from Study 1 showed that the sense of preparedness was verified by the performance on the knowledge test and was related to self-efficacy. The classroom observations indicated that these preservice teachers were not well prepared to teach ELL students and their mentoring teachers were not providing any guidance.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 147
2008 - Instruction Article
McLeod, S., Brown, G., McDaniels, P., Sledge, L.
Views: 1262       [471]
Abstract: In response to widespread concern that many American students do not write well enough to meet the requirements of higher education and the workplace, the College Board’s National Commission on Writing in America’s Schools and Colleges has called for a writing revolution. A key component of this revolution is evaluation, with particular emphasis on the need to align writing standards, writing instruction, and writing assessment. Teachers of writing want to provide their students with the kind of quality feedback that coaches and personal trainers provide their clients, but large classes and heavy teaching loads often frustrate their intention. Peer assessment can alleviate this problem. In fact, research indicates that when students are given valid and reliable assessment instruments to guide the process, feedback from peers can be as effective as—or more effective than—feedback from professors. As a direct response to the Commission’s call for curricular alignment, Jackson State University has launched the Reader’s Assessment Project, a project that seeks to harness the power of Peer Assisted Learning by developing and applying a series of analytic Peer Assessment rubrics for specific rhetorical modes. While analytic rubrics are useful in identifying broad areas for improvement in student writing, such rubrics are sometimes difficult to use because they address general qualities of effective writing without reference to the way those qualities operate in specific rhetorical modes, such as comparison/contrast or process. Analytic scoring also tends to be timeconsuming. The Reader’s Assessment Project at Jackson State University seeks to overcome these drawbacks by developing mode-specific analytic instruments that are aligned with the reading process. In this article, members of the Reader’s Assessment team review the relevant literature, outline the conceptual framework and methodology of the project, and explain how they have harnessed the power of Peer Assisted Learning with the Reader’s Assessment rubrics through a strategy that they call CARE (creating a reassuring environment).

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 148
2009 - Research Article
Magno, C., Sembrano, J.
Views: 1262       [656]
Abstract: The study investigated whether learner-centeredness is reflected in teacher performance assessment as applied in a higher education sample. A measure of teachers’ performance anchored on Danielson’s Components of Professional Practice was constructed in three parallel forms. A measure of learner-centeredness with four factors (developing positive interpersonal characteristics, encouraging personal challenge, adopting class learning needs, and facilitating the learning process) was also used. These two instruments were administered to 2,032 college students in 85 classes. Different sets of measurement models were constructed where all factors of the teacher assessment and learner-centered scale are intercorrelated in a measurement model. The measurement models were tested using Confirmatory Factor Analysis (CFA). The results showed that learner-centeredness is reflected in the three forms of the teacher assessment as indicated by their significant paths, p<.05. The four-factor model, where learner-centered is related to each form of the teacher assessment had the best fit (GFI=.94, TLI=.98, RMSEA=.06). Adequate fit was also established when learner-centeredness is related to separate domains of teacher assessment (GFI=.97, TLI=.99, RMSEA=.04). Results indicated that high performance in the constructed teacher assessment is indicative of learner-centered practices. Theoretical implications of the measurement models about assessment and the teaching-learning paradigm were also discussed.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 149
2010 - Instruction Article
Bankowski, E.
Views: 1253       [717]
Abstract: This study focused on training students in skills essential to making oral presentations based on original and independent research work as part of their English for Academic Purposes (EAP) course. As a result of the training, students showed an increase in the successful use of researchrelated skills and a great improvement in their ability to present their findings in English. Students appeared to have a better grasp of their subject matter, to be more at ease, less reliant on their notes, and better able to address their audiences directly. Students’ oral presentations not only illustrated a greater ability of students to use appropriate formats and structures in English but also a willingness and ability to adopt new methods of learning. This would seem to suggest that the preference for ‘rote learning’ so commonly attributed to Hong Kong students is indeed the result of expectations and experiences in previous learning situations rather than the intrinsic and inherent characteristics of the learners themselves.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 150
2008 - Instruction Article
Panday, P.
Views: 1244       [271]
Abstract: The article intends to simplify the different aspects of podcasting. The article covers types of podcasts; the pedagogical benefits of podcasting; the connection between theory and podcasting; answers to questions, queries, and apprehensions. Before trying out a new tool, it is important to understand why we do things the way we do. A crucial part of using any tool or technology is to understand, test, and determine the pedagogical appropriateness of it for specific context. Through the article, the author has tried to suggest some of the uses of podcasting along with the pedagogical appropriateness in different scenarios. At the end, the author has tried to (through pictorial representation) describe the podcasting community and the tasks performed by the community members. Also, through a pictorial representation, the author has provided a gist of the podcasting creation process as a producer and as a consumer.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 151
Abstract: Though the concept of noticing has been extensively addressed in the SLA literature, few studies suggest promoting noticing through collaborative feedback tasks (CFTs) in an EFL college writing classroom. To fill this gap, this paper attempts to provide a framework for promoting noticing through CFTs using three sequenced and interrelated CFTs: (I) pre-noticing stage that aims at instructing the students on how the feedback task functions and what its purposes are, (II) whilenoticing stage that is based on two interrelated feedback tasks, namely contrastive-critical framing and transformed practice, and (III) post-noticing stage that is aimed at helping students reflect on what they have learned during the entire feedback process. To begin with, the article provides definitions of noticing. It then discusses how noticing and feedback are closely related to facilitate second or foreign language writing learning. In what follows, it discusses how noticing and CFTs complement one another in order to facilitate critical and focused noticing to help students enhance their writing accuracy and fluency. Lastly, the article examines some challenges in promoting noticing through CFTs in an EFL writing classroom.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 152
2008 - Research Article
Light, G., Calkins, S., Luna, M., Drane, D.
Views: 1219       [328]
Abstract: This paper reports findings from an empirical four-year study designed to investigate the relationship between key constructs of an extended model of teaching and learning in higher education. Using a mixed-methods approach, we sought to assess the impact of a year-long faculty development program (FDP) designed for pre-tenure faculty on participant approaches to teaching. From our analysis of participant critical reports of teaching, post-program interviews, and the Approaches to Teaching Inventory (ATI), we found evidence of positive change in the approaches to teaching of junior faculty participants in the FDP. All three methods elicited evidence indicating that participating faculty moved towards more conceptual change/student focused approaches to teaching, and that a significant part of that change could be attributed to their participation in the program.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 153
Abstract: The central place of the learning environment and the personal characteristics of the learner in influencing whether students adopt deep or surface approaches to learning is well evidenced in the literature (for example, Marton & Saljo, 1976; Biggs, 1987; Entwhistle, 2001; Ramsden, 2003). For this reason, tertiary educators are constantly seeking opportunities to provide best practice in their university classrooms. Yet simply motivating students to participate in class does not necessarily alter overall learning styles (Herington & Weaven, 2008). Although the term “learning style” is somewhat problematic (Richardson, 2000), previous research has shown that students’ tendency towards a particular learning strategy affects their learning-related performance (Heikkila & Lonka, 2006). This suggests that the process of “unlearning” previous learning styles may pose a significant problem for academics if they hope to change their students’ learning processes from surface to deep learning. As a profession, teaching at the tertiary level obviously draws upon a formal knowledge base. An important step in the translation of the formal knowledge base to enlightened practice is to draw upon tertiary students' experiential and informal knowledge. What learning-related concepts, and misconceptions do they hold? What is going on in the students' minds? Specifically, this paper will provide information on how three pre-service students currently enrolled in a Bachelor of Arts (Primary) course at the Sultan Hassanal Bolkiah Institute of Education (SHBIE), Univeristi of Brunei Daurssalam, Brunei Darussalam, approach study and how this approach can affect their concepts of learning.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 154
2008 - Instruction Article
Brank, E., Fox, K., Youstin, T., Boeppler, L.
Views: 1198       [424]
Abstract: The current research employs the use of content analysis to teach research methods concepts among students enrolled in an upper division research methods course. Students coded and analyzed Jimmy Buffett song lyrics rather than using a downloadable database or collecting survey data. Students’ knowledge of content analysis concepts increased after a lecture on the topic of content analysis, but they further improved after participating in the song coding, data cleaning, and writing of results. Additionally, students reported high satisfaction with the project and believed it was an interesting and enjoyable technique for learning about research methods. We provide suggestions for incorporating similar data collection activities in undergraduate research methods courses.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 155
Abstract: The purpose of this study was to explore the experience of students with performance-based, in-class and learner-centered, online assessment and the effects of these formats on comprehensive exam scores in an educational psychology course required of participants in a teacher education program. In our quantitative analysis, we investigated the effects of in-class and online exams on undergraduate students’ performance on an in-class comprehensive final (n=141). Students were randomly assigned by course section to take one proctored exam in-class and two other unit exams online in a learner-centered format. At the end of the course, students in all sections took a proctored comprehensive final, consisting of a series of multiple choice questions closely aligned with questions from the unit exams. No significant differences were found between content items initially assessed utilizing the traditional, in-class format and the learner-centered online format. In our qualitative analysis, students in one of the six sections (n=22) were selected to participate in openended interviews. A phenomenological method was used to collect and analyze responses to the question: “When thinking about your experiences with both the in-class exam and Blackboard exams in [course name], what stands out for you?” Findings from our qualitative analysis resulted in separate yet balanced themes for participants’ perceptions of in-class and online exams. For both categories of themes, the constructs of stress, control, and knowing stood out for participants. Implications of this research project are discussed in relation to the use of learner-centered assessment.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 156
Abstract: Neoliberal ideologies influence both the content and pedagogical approach of educational leadership programmes. This article proposes an alternate pedagogy, one which privileges the experiential nature of the leadership and challenges students to critique prevailing ideologies within education. The authors describe the reshaping of a compulsory, foundational academic paper within a Masters of educational leadership programme to focus on the phenomenon of leadership more explicitly. They illustrate the use of student stories and hermeneutic interpretation to deepen the appreciation of the contextual nature of educational leadership practice. The authors suggest that the influence of this pedagogical approach resides in the sincerity of the pedagogical comportment of the teaching faculty and the elusiveness of the taken-for-granted nature of leadership. They conclude that pedagogical processes that maintain a centrality of concern for the humanity of leadership experiences are a matter of urgency in our present educational context.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 157
2012 - Research Article
Lilly, E.
Views: 1183       [1080]
Abstract: In-class debates are frequently used to encourage student engagement. Ideally, after researching both sides of the debate, students will form their own opinions based on what they have learned. However, in a large course of Environmental Science, opinions of students, when surveyed after the debate, were remarkably consistent with the position that they had been assigned. This study aimed to determine whether an assigned debate position influenced student opinion. Prior to being assigned a debate position, 132 students in Environmental Science were polled for their opinions on six controversial issues. Each student was assigned to a position, without regard to their opinion, for a debate on one of the issues. Students researched both positions and constructed arguments and counter arguments for both sides, but only argued one side of the debate in class. One week following the debates, students were again polled for their opinions. Prior to debating, only 41% of students happened to agree with their assigned position, yet following the debates, 77% of students agreed with their assigned positions (p = 0.0000005). This suggests that researching and/or arguing an assigned position in a class debate influences student opinion toward that position.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 158
Abstract: This article presents the early findings of an experimental design to see if students perform better when taking collaborative notes in small groups as compared to students who use traditional notes. Students are increasingly bringing electronic devices into social science classrooms. Few instructors have attempted robustly and systematically to implement this technology to facilitate student learning. This study examines the efficacy of using technology to improve student note-taking. Cloud-based collaborative software makes it possible for the first time to break down the most basic walls that separate students during the process of taking and encoding notes. Collaborative note participants used Google Drive under direction of an instructor to assess performance differences. Strong evidence is found that such groups improve grades and related learning outcomes.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 159
Abstract: How widespread is the use of personal self-disclosure by faculty in the college classroom? Employing a national survey of teaching faculty within liberal arts schools and smaller colleges and universities, the incidence of self-reported faculty self-disclosure was investigated. Teachers (n = 430) provided responses reflecting the content and context of self-disclosure in instructional and mentoring roles. Response data revealed few differences in self-reported self-disclosure across several key background characteristics such as teaching discipline, teaching experience, class size, or class level. ANOVAs revealed significant differences on two specific variables: Self-disclosure was less frequently reported by those with the lowest tenure status and more frequently reported to occur during longer class sessions. Implications of these findings for teaching practice and future research are also discussed.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 160
2008 - Research Article
Byrne, M., Flood, B., Willis, P.
Views: 1176       [325]
Abstract: This paper provides a comparative analysis of the learning approaches of students taking their first course in accounting at a United States or an Irish university. The data for this study was gathered from 204 students in the U.S. and 309 in Ireland, using the Approaches and Study Skills Inventory for Students (ASSIST, 1997) which measures learning approaches on three dimensions: deep, strategic, and surface. The analysis reveals that while both samples favor a strategic approach over the other approaches, the U.S. students have a significantly higher score on the deep and strategic scales compared to the Irish students. Differences between the samples at the subscale level - such as students’ intrinsic interest, time management, and fear of failure - are also reported. Finally, the study contextualizes the findings by analyzing variations in the learning environment of the two universities.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 161
Abstract: Academics are now expected to manage increasingly demanding research, administrative, and teaching obligations. These demands in practice mean that the pressures to balance teaching and research duties render cultivating links between the two activities a less-than-intuitive process. The author describes the difficulties faced by academics in the United Kingdom, students’ learning experiences and perceptions of quality higher education, and the ways these issues relate to modern society’s expectations of what University education should achieve. The author also considers how these issues are currently received and managed by Universities. To provide good quality higher education to the next generation, government and Universities should work together to address disparities and fill gaps in the research-teaching nexus. The evidence points to an urgent need to confront issues in a way that will benefit students, academics, Universities, and society. A non-exhaustive list of proposals described here aims to reverse the current trends that pull research and teaching apart. Such policies should be implemented, either on a national basis, or by individual Universities and should reflect the educational philosophy and cultural outlook of each institution. Ultimately a positive “nexus” may have potential benefits for both science research and teaching in the United Kingdom.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 162
2017 - Instruction Article
Lewis, E.
Views: 1175       [2646]
Abstract: Educators in higher education often seek innovative pedagogies to include in their classrooms. This article describes an integrative learning experience and details the planning, implementation, considerations, and benefits of creating a major-specific undergraduate research day. The event created an opportunity for students to gain confidence and practice discussing their work during research poster presentations. The event also allowed them to integrate classroom activities and extracurricular experiences to make meaningful connections. Identifying the steps, considerations, and outcomes may inform educators considering implementing this technique. The description of the undergraduate research day is applicable across disciplines and is relevant to faculty and staff working with undergraduate students.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 163
2008 - Instruction Article
Deed, C.
Views: 1172       [448]
Abstract: Conversations between educators and students about choices and strategies are an important pedagogical mechanism to examine the abstract concept of learning. Although students have tacit knowledge about their approach to learning, they are often unable to coherently communicate their ideas. Drawing on the theory of metacognition, the technique of strategic questions is outlined as a means to represent, organize, and communicate students’ abstract ideas about themselves as learners. Strategic questions provide a metacognitive language that allows students and teachers to examine a learning experience. In particular, reasoning for decisions and action, doubts or concerns, explanation of engagement and effort, and values and expectations. A case study is outlined of the use of strategic questions within a pre-service teacher education degree as a method that supports a reflective practitioner approach to learning.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 164
2015 - Research Article
Gebre, E., Saroyan, A., Aulls, M.
Views: 1171       [1966]
Abstract: This paper examined professors’ conceptions of effective teaching in the context of a course they were teaching in active learning classrooms and how the conceptions related to the perceived role and use of computers in their teaching. We interviewed 13 professors who were teaching in active learning classrooms in winter 2011 in a large research university in Canada. The interviews captured what professors consider effective teaching, expected learning outcomes for students, instructional strategies and the role participants saw for computers in their teaching. Analysis of interview transcripts using a holistic inductive and constant comparison approach resulted in three conceptions of effective teaching: transmitting knowledge, engaging students, and developing learning independence. Professors’ perception about the role and use of computers was found to be in line with their conceptions of effective teaching. Professors whose conception of effective teaching focused on developing learning independence used computers as tools for students’ learning; those with a transmitting knowledge conception considered computers as a means of accessing or presenting information. Data collected from students about their use and their professors’ use of computers in the course supports this conclusion. Results have implications for design of active learning environments and faculty development initiatives.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 165
2008 - Research Article
Tait, K.
Views: 1149       [332]
Abstract: Teaching and learning, as two of the most fundamental components of the educational process, have been of interest to a variety of individuals concerned with tertiary education for a long time (e.g., Biggs & Moore, 1993; Marton, 1997; Ramsden, 2003). Few individuals would deny that learning is the primary purpose of higher education and that teaching is the foremost means by which that goal is accomplished. Consequently, tertiary educators constantly seek opportunities to provide best practice in their university classrooms. As a profession, teaching at the tertiary level obviously draws upon a formal knowledge base. An important step in the translation of the formal knowledge base to enlightened practice is to draw upon tertiary students' experiential and informal knowledge. This paper discusses how a work based learning experience was utilized to enhance a post graduate course on collaborative consultation and team building methods.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 166
Abstract: This article describes a possible praxis for an undergraduate learning theories course. The philosophies of “a language-based theory of learning” (Wells, 1999), writing across the curriculum (Young, 1994), learner-centered education (Lambert & McCombs, 1998), and critical-thinking (Paul, 1995) are interwoven with the rationale and practice of this course. The paper is structured with descriptions of the institutional context, the theoretical frame, the course organization, the writing assignments and criteria used in this course. In addition, samples of student writing are reviewed to demonstrate students’ developing sense-making of the content studied. Possible crossdisciplinary applications and the author’s self-reflections about the course viewed through “constructivist dilemmas” (Windschitl, 2002) are addressed in the conclusion.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 167
2009 - Instruction Article
Hughes, J.
Views: 1144       [694]
Abstract: Teacher education and the teaching profession are adapting to innovative methods to ensure the professional longevity and effectiveness of those who become educators. This is particularly important because of the early, and sometimes abrupt, exit of beginning teachers from the profession. Clearly, to mitigate such early exodus from the profession, those responsible for teacher education must examine how they prepare student teachers and whether or not they are equipped to face the realities of the classroom when they enter the profession. This paper presents a modality that engages pre-professionals or student teachers in meaningful and productive field experiences that will improve student teachers’ learning. The author presents an instructional model that can be applied to prepare student teachers for more effective field experiences that will improve their learning.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 168
2011 - Instruction Article
Starcher, K., Proffitt, D.
Views: 1137       [1057]
Abstract: Reasons are examined as to why students are reluctant to complete assigned textbook readings on a timely basis. Prior research suggested that lack of student motivation, lack of student knowledge of effective study habits, competing demands on student time, and lack of congruency between student objectives for the course and professor objectives for students could be the cause. Our empirical research indicated that both the textbook and the professor can impact student willingness to complete assigned readings. Students (n=394) suggested that a good textbook be reasonably priced ($50 or less), concise (short chapters), loaded with great graphics, and easy to understand. Business faculty (n=77) shared ideas on how they encourage students to prepare for class by completing their assigned textbook reading. The authors divided the responses into one of two general categories: (1) requiring additional student preparation prior to class, or (2) incorporating in-class activities designed to measure the degree of student preparation. These responses were then categorized as reflections of professorial assumptions (Theory X or Theory Y) regarding their students. One author shared his success with the use of Thoughtful Intellectually Engaging Responses (TIERs) and Reading Logs. The authors conclude that an effective approach will require professors to develop course pedagogy that will attack multiple reasons for lack of preparation simultaneously so that we can reach all students who would otherwise remain unprepared. Suggestions on how to continue the dialog on this topic as well as suggestions for future research are provided.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 169
Abstract: Self-determination theory (SDT) underpins research on learner empowerment, but it is rarely discussed in empowerment-related literature. In addition, a motivational measure stemming from SDT has received little visibility in communication research. To address these concerns, this study focuses on motivational theory and measurement in an attempt to tease out the relationship between motivation and learner empowerment as well as how these constructs are related to students’ choicemaking opportunities in the classroom. In essence, this study aims to offer a strong synthesis of the literature related to these constructs, and also to make methodological and practical advancements in understanding student motivation, learner empowerment, and how freedom in the college classroom shapes students’ enthusiasm for learning.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 170
2008 - Instruction Article
Trask, B., marotz-bade, R., settles, b., gentry, d., berke, d.
Views: 1110       [355]
Abstract: This article highlights the importance of mentoring processes in the education of future scholars. The purpose is to recommend that scholars link the process of mentoring graduate students with promoting a scholarship of teaching and learning (SoTL). It suggests that through this process graduate students will acquire some of the skills they need to be successful in careers that require teaching as a central component of their work. Recommendations are provided for informal and formal mentoring initiatives.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 171
2008 - Instruction Article
Lauer, T., Hendrix, J.
Views: 1102       [329]
Abstract: In this study, we assessed small and large group discussions and repeated writing assignments with the intent to objectively measure the values of these learning pedagogies. We crafted a model where students researched a question, formulated a written answer, discussed it with their peers, and revised their answers. Then, we did it with repetition to provide practice and experience. Improvements in understanding due to discussions were measured at 12%, while improvements of writing skills increased 29% during the course of the semester. Because we carefully structured the methodology and intent of the assignments, we suggest the assessment data could be used for quantitatively measuring student learning.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 172
Abstract: Many researchers emphasize the significance of employing inquiry learning in shaping preservice elementary teachers’ tendencies to teach science. Using an interpretive research methodology, this study examined the influence of employing an inquiry-based teaching approach on teaching biology to preservice elementary teachers at the Hashemite University in Jordan. The purpose was to explore 3 teachers’ perspectives of the teaching approach as well as to examine the effect of taking such courses on their future intentions to use inquiry. Findings indicated that participants were generally supportive of an inquiry-based learning strategy as they saw value in the inquiry experience provided from their course. Finally, the study suggested that support should be devoted to encourage the continuation and development of inquiry-based laboratories to better prepare prospective teachers. Furthermore, collaboration between postsecondary science teachers and science educators should be established to promote understanding of inquiry learning.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 173
2008 - Research Article
Lee, K.
Views: 1097       [257]
Abstract: This case study outlines a program developed by a group of 6 teachers’ college lecturers who volunteered to provide a technology program to year 7 & 8 children (11- and 12-year-olds) for a year. This involved teaching technology once a week. As technology education was a new curriculum area when first introduced to the college, few lecturers had classroom experience of teaching this new subject. Although the lecturers had sound personal constructs of technology education and lectured in the area of technology education, teaching this age group for this extended period was a new experience for all. The lecturers’ honest evaluations document the difficulties and emotional times they encountered as they tried to implement the technology curriculum.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 174
Abstract: Although affect is widely recognized as a powerful force in determining students’ academic success, researchers and practitioners have paid little attention to emotional barriers that often impede college success or how instructors may respond constructively when such barriers arise. The purpose of this paper is to initiate discussion of this important problem by offering a model of how an initially resistant, fearful, and/or anxious student can use emotionally unpleasant experiences to transform himself or herself into a more autonomous and successful learner. We offer prima facie support for this model by presenting the results of two cases of first year students. Although this model may not apply to all anxious first year students, it nevertheless has value (a) as a resource for instructors working with students who fit this pattern and (b) as an example of how the role of emotions in learning can profitably be studied.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 175
2008 - Instruction Article
Wright, A., Calabrese, N., Henry, J.
Views: 1079       [331]
Abstract: Cura personalis (care of the individual) represents one of the core ideals of all Jesuit colleges and universities. At one urban Jesuit college, faculty members of The School of Education and Human Services and The College of Arts and Sciences initiated a service-learning project in a freshman level pedagogical core course. One goal of the Children’s Literature course was to promote deeper understanding, empathy, and action in undergraduate students towards working with children in urban schools. In order to promote this goal, a 10-hour service-learning requirement was added to the course. For 10 hours, students in the course, teacher candidates and others, worked in a multicultural urban classroom, sharing multicultural literature and classroom activities. Overall, the students, who mostly came from suburban environments, felt the experience was rewarding. Many students came to realize that their preconceptions about urban schools were inaccurate. The experience made several of the prospective teachers more willing to teach in urban schools. Also, students became aware of the many basic needs of the urban schools and how these needs affected student learning. Many students came to believe that student diversity in the elementary classroom had a positive influence on the classroom environment.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 176
2010 - Instruction Article
Cunsolo Willox, A., Harper, S., Bridger, D., Morton, S., Orbach, A., Sarapura, S.
Views: 1075       [692]
Abstract: Metaphors are pervasive and accessible thinking and learning machines that have the ability to disrupt and transform our patterns of thought. While much has been written about metaphor as a pedagogical tool, the potential learning opportunity that arises when students co-create metaphor within the classroom as a way to make sense and meaning of the curriculum and co-discover knowledge is not discussed. Through the example of six graduate students co-creating a metaphor of capacity-development-as-fire, this critical reflective paper describes an emergent learner-driven process involved in utilizing metaphor as a learning activity to promote deeper and long-lasting student learning and knowledge acquisition.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 177
2009 - Instruction Article
Miller, R.
Views: 1068       [426]
Abstract: During instruction, higher education faculty should properly address matters of concern related to student performance, conduct and behavior. History is a reminder of this persistent issue. Therefore, a logical sequence of decision-making can be followed to recognize, distinguish and act upon these concerns. Applications for a flowchart tool are offered.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 178
Abstract: The increase in numbers of international students who have English as a second language (ESL) and are studying in English-medium universities has renewed the emphasis of English language development in higher education, particularly concerning academic writing. Much of the discussion has concentrated on developing best practices in providing support via Language and Academic Support (LAS) programs. However, the main challenge in recent years has focused on integrating disciplinary and language learning. What has been largely missing from the discussion are the views of lecturers and students regarding the strategies they use to develop academic writing in the discipline. This paper addresses this issue. The analysis reveals that academic writing within the disciplines is largely an individual endeavor for both lecturers and their students. Lecturers focus on explaining what skills students are required to demonstrate in their assignments, but students are more concerned with understanding how they can develop these skills. The implications are discussed concerning the development of a whole institutional approach for integrating language and disciplinary teaching.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 179
2008 - Research Article
Fives, H., Looney, L.
Views: 1062       [330]
Abstract: The purpose of this study was to provide an exploratory investigation of college-level instructors’ sense of teaching and collective efficacy. We investigated the relations of teacher- and collective-efficacy with a series of variables: experience, professional level, age, gender, academic domain (for teacher-efficacy only), and academic department (for collective-efficacy only) as well as the relationship between collective- and teacher-efficacy. Data from 117 graduate students, lecturers, and faculty were analyzed. Differences in teacher-efficacy were found with respect to gender and academic domain. Differences in collective-efficacy were not found across departments, experience levels, or professional levels. Teacher-efficacy was significantly correlated with collective-efficacy.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 180
2009 - Research Article
Bolton, E., Brennan, M., Terry, B.
Views: 1061       [583]
Abstract: This article highlights how undergraduate students implemented inquiry-based learning strategies to learn how nonprofit organizations utilize volunteers. In inquiry-based learning, students begin with a problem or question with some degree of focus or structure provided by the professor. The student inquiry showcased in this article was based on a questionnaire used in an interview with the chief executive officer of a local nonprofit organization. The data collected by students participating in the inquiry-based project contribute to a study that may be used to guide student learning outcomes as they prepare for careers in the nonprofit sector. Inquiry-based learning is a useful approach to focus student learning outcomes and engage students in authentic, active research.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 181
2010 - Research Article
Waterman, M., Weber, J., Pracht, C., Kunz, D., Evans, B., Hoffman, S., Smentkowski, B., Starrett, D.
Views: 1058       [736]
Abstract: The Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SoTL) Fellows Program at Southeast Missouri State University supports an annual cohort of 10 faculty Fellows to evaluate, through individual research projects, the effect of teaching on student learning of two or more of the university’s General Education objectives. Designed around practical action research and collaborative peer consulting, the SoTL Fellows Program creates a multidisciplinary community of peers who meet approximately monthly (seminar schedule included). Subgroups within the seminar address sequenced questions about research processes and then collaboratively consult with one another as they apply the research processes to their specific projects. The Fellowship year culminates in a presentation of project findings to the University community. The Program is well supported by the Administration. Fellows receive up to $1500 for research and travel. Analysis of 3 cohorts of Fellows showed that 66% of the projects had clear results showing enhanced student learning. The surveyed Fellows affected over 4500 students in 100 courses. Most of the projects emphasized a new teaching approach, new curriculum materials, integrated applications, and active learning. Fifteen projects were presented at conferences and 7 were published in peer reviewed journals to date. Participation in the SoTL Fellows Program is viewed positively in promotion and tenure decisions, with Fellows reporting a variety of intrinsic rewards as well.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 182
2008 - Research Article
Williamson, D., McDougall, R., Brien, D.
Views: 1039       [445]
Abstract: Writing courses are increasingly popular in higher education. This paper presents a pedagogic approach that combines theory and practice, in an accessible way, to help students appreciate the interrelation of styles and contexts, and develop skills for writing in a range of genres. The approach is characterised as adaptive application. It is illustrated by the modification of a traditional tutorialgroup structure to provide a new setting in which students can immediately apply key terms of rhetorical theory as they negotiate differentiated experiences as writers, readers, speakers, and listeners. This change in classroom practice is achieved by adopting and adapting the roles, organizational genres, and communication conventions of the committee meeting. The resultant hybrid form of committee-tutorial assists students to engage collegially in the disciplinary study and practice of writing. It also encourages them to consider how they may transfer their understanding of rhetorical principles and techniques to writing endeavours in other scholarly and social settings.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 183
Abstract: Student response systems (SRSs) are increasingly being used in the classroom. However, there have been few well-controlled experimental evaluations to determine whether students benefit academically from these instructional tools. Additionally, comparisons of SRS with other interactive methods have not often been conducted. We compared SRS, Constructed Overt Response (COR), passive, and control conditions to determine their effects on learning and affect. We found that students performed better in the interactive conditions—SRS and COR—than the other conditions. Participants’ gain and retention of gain scores in the SRS condition were lower than those in the COR condition. Participants in the SRS condition perceived their condition as more enjoyable than those in the passive condition and more useful than those in the control condition. Additional research questions are raised about how these interactive methods may best improve student learning.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 184
2008 - Research Article
Bain, A., Lancaster, J., Zundans, L.
Views: 1032       [394]
Abstract: Pattern language is the lexicon used to express the schema of a field of professional practice (Smethurst, 1997). This lexicon is frequently presumed to exist in communities of practice in educational settings, although the findings derived from the longitudinal study of schools (Elmore, 1996; Goodlad, 1984; Lortie, 1975; McLaughlin & Talbert, 2001; Sizer, 1987) indicate that the presence of such a lexicon is much more likely to be the exception than the rule. This study sought to establish the differential effects on pattern language of embedding evidence-based practice in the design of an inclusive education teacher preparation course. Embedded design involves creating selfrepeating patterns in the instructional design of a course by expressing essential design features at multiple levels in the teaching and learning experience. In this case study, classroom communities of practice were employed as a learning context for students to develop their pattern language and as vehicle for applying the embedded design principle. The study also sought to establish whether increases in the frequency and sophistication of pattern language use increased as the pre-service course progressed through four teaching cycles and students learned more about inclusive approaches. The results indicate that pattern language frequency and sophistication covaried with participation in the course, and increased over time. The findings are discussed within the context of building more rigorous teacher preparation programs and the role of embedded design in pre-service inclusive education.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 185
2014 - Research Article
Leidenfrost, B., Strassnig, B., Schütz, M., Carbon, C., Schabmann, A.
Views: 1032       [1785]
Abstract: Universities frequently offer support programs to assist first-year students with the transition from school to the university. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of different mentoring styles on mentee academic performance after 1 year and 2 years of study. Participants consisted of 417 psychology students who started their course of study in the 2007/2008 winter term at the University of Vienna. Three hundred twenty-eight students participated voluntarily in the peer mentoring program, Cascaded Blended Mentoring, in which they were supported by 48 peer mentors (advanced students) in small groups. Eighty-nine students did not participate in the mentoring program. The mentoring groups were classified according to one of three mentoring styles described by Leidenfrost, Strassnig, Schabmann, Carbon, and Spiel (2011): (b) motivating master mentoring, (b) informatory standard mentoring, and (c) negative minimalist mentoring. Our data suggest that participants in the mentoring program performed better in their studies than students who did not participate in terms of average grade and number of courses passed. There was, however, no specific impact of the different mentoring styles on mentee academic performance.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 186
Abstract: While there are recognized and demonstrated benefits of service learning for student outcomes, challenges professors may face using such approach for competency-based teaching have seldom been discussed. This paper describes the integration of service-learning pedagogy in teaching a project-based course on program planning to new Masters of Public Health (MPH) students. In addition to the benefits of learning outcomes, challenges from the students’ perspective are described. More importantly, challenges that many professors may face when incorporating service learning into instruction are discussed. These include heavy time commitment, new MPH students with diverse backgrounds, and student anxiety. Strategies used to address these challenges are also shared, such as plan in advance, acknowledge challenges and provide resources, develop guided instructions, and tailor to students’ stages of learning. Students’ feedback and responses to the overall course and these strategies are presented. This paper aims to encourage more dialogue on using service-learning pedagogy in higher education and help instructors be prepared to deal with some of the more complex issues when infusing such pedagogy among new graduate students.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 187
2010 - Research Article
Reupert, A., Hemmings, B., Connors, J.
Views: 1026       [726]
Abstract: In this study, the practices and views of lecturers who teach inclusive education to trainee primary school teachers are examined in relation to their own inclusive teaching practices as they pertain to working with students with a disability. This examination draws on interview data gleaned from nine university lecturers. These data provide important information about inclusive education practices in higher education institutions generally and, in particular, education faculties. The results of the data analysis indicate that even though all the lecturers self identify as inclusive educators and adopt various inclusive teaching and assessment practices, barriers exist that impede inclusive practice in tertiary settings. Recommendations for future research and training conclude the paper.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 188
2009 - Research Article
Katic, E., Hmelo-Silver, C., Weber, K.
Views: 1011       [496]
Abstract: This study investigates how a variety of resources mediated collaborative problem solving for a group of preservice teachers. The participants in this study completed mathematical, combinatorial tasks and then watched a video of a sixth grader as he exhibited sophisticated reasoning to recognize the isomorphic structure of these problems. The preservice teachers used a variety of material tools to solve the same problem, construct explanations of the learning processes that the sixth grader engaged in, and pose further questions about the problem to clarify their solutions. The results of this study suggest that simple material tools helped to motivate and mediate the participants’ collaborative problem-solving discourse.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 189
2010 - Research Article
Bound, H.
Views: 1004       [723]
Abstract: Dialogue is “at the heart of the e-learning experience” (Littleton & Whitelock 2004, p.173). It is the means to building mutual understanding, encouraging the construction of personal meaning and ensuring engagement. Inquiry requires dialogue. If we value processes of inquiry, then it is at our peril that we ignore the complex issues and aspects of designing and facilitating in online environments for inquiry processes. How do we design online learning experiences that encourage dialogue and a process of inquiry? A phenomenological inquiry using student postings, student interviews and survey data from an online undergraduate course is undertaken to explore the dynamic interrelation between design, facilitation, tools and learning. As part of the analysis, a heuristic device was developed – the Map of aspects of dialogical inquiry. In this article, this device and the dynamic interrelation between design, facilitation, tools and learning are discussed, and implications for practitioners teaching in online environments are explored.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 190
Abstract: Immersion service-learning courses provide increased opportunities for faculty and students to experience the transformational effects of service-learning. This paper focuses on the experiences of faculty and the responses of students who took part in several immersion service-learning courses taught between 2005 and 2007 during the Winter term at Elon University in North Carolina. Four major themes were identified as being significant in these immersion service-learning courses: 1) sharing living space impacts the student-faculty relationship, 2) immersion faculty leaders are placed in multiple roles with multiple opportunities for role modeling, 3) immersion faculty experience their own transformative learning, which often further complicates their roles as leaders, and 4) immersion faculty leaders often experience role conflict in maintaining leadership roles and assessing student work in immersion courses. We conclude that while the role conflicts must be negotiated faculty modeling service behavior may have stronger lessons for students and their future civic engagement than other on-campus service learning courses.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 191
2010 - Research Article
Chadwick, S., Ralston, E.
Views: 986       [622]
Abstract: This study analyzes the extent to which students using web-based discussion boards show an increase in perspective-taking in structured and unstructured discussions. Messages from fifty-six students enrolled in one of two courses were content analyzed using Jarvela and Hakkinen’s (2003) expansion of Selman’s (1980) perspective-taking coding scheme. There was a significant difference in the level of perspective-taking shown across the three periods of the semester. The level of perspective-taking in structured discussions was significantly correlated with learning. Class leaders showed higher levels of perspective-taking than did other students in the class. The results suggest a relationship between use of higher order perspective-taking and learning, particularly when instructors provide structure for student discussions.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 192
Abstract: Despite the fact that longitudinal data have been compiled over the past 30 years among undergraduate students in higher education settings regarding narcissism, the literature is devoid of empirical investigations that explore the relationships between narcissism and learning. Because the data suggest that narcissism scores are increasing each year among this population, an exploration of the relationship between narcissism and learning is timely and warranted. Sampling from university undergraduate students, this study uses the Narcissistic Personality Inventory, the Big Five Inventory, and the Achievement Goal Questionnaire to verify the known relationships between narcissism and the Big Five personality traits of extraversion and agreeableness; to verify the known relationships between the Big Five personality traits of extraversion and agreeableness and goal orientation; and to explore a previously undocumented empirical relationship between narcissism and performance goal orientation. Results of this exploratory study indicate that while narcissism does contribute to a performance goal orientation, it is not a substantial variable in determining achievement goal orientation in general. The study addresses the implications and limitations of this research in addition to areas for additional investigation.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 193
Abstract: The concept of research-led education is gaining increasing attention in higher education. However, the concept may be interpreted in different ways, some more feasible within an undergraduate curriculum than others. The approach described in this paper aims to introduce students to ways of thinking and acting like a researcher through engaging in research-like activities during lectures, tutorials, practical sessions, and assessment. This case study models an approach to research-led education that involves identifying key research skills, then designing learning activities that encourage the development of those skills, such as collecting small amounts of data in laboratories, using data analysis, and writing weekly practical exercises and reports; presenting findings to peers; interpreting and writing results and conclusions to accompany data drawn from the research literature; exploring the literature in a research field and finding gaps in the research; and producing a mock research grant application. We conclude that this approach to research-led education can be integrated into the general undergraduate curriculum with relative ease.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 194
2011 - Research Article
Malm, J., Bryngfors, L., Mörner, L.
Views: 964       [1025]
Abstract: Supplemental Instruction (SI) is today a well-known academic assistance program that provides help for students in “difficult” courses. SI has repeatedly been shown to decrease the percentage of failures in the course as well as increasing course grades for students who attended SI sessions. Although SI is open for all students, its main objective is to come to terms with students’ high failure rates and retention problems. And even if SI has been shown to reduce failure rates and increase reenrollment figures, surprisingly few studies have been devoted to determine how well it benefits students with different prior academic ability. These studies tend to show that “weaker” students benefit from SI. The results for “average” and “strong” students are not as clear. The present study focuses on the benefit of SI for “weak”, “average,” and “strong” first-year engineering students in a calculus course. The results show that all three groups benefit from SI and that the failure rates among students with low prior mathematics achievement who had high SI attendance are almost as low as for students with high prior mathematics achievement who do not attend SI.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 195
2010 - Instruction Article
Wolff, K., Wahde, M.
Views: 962       [693]
Abstract: In this paper, we summarize our experiences from teaching a course in humanoid robotics at Chalmers University of Technology in Göteborg, Sweden. We describe the robotic platform used in the course and we propose the use of a custom-built robot consisting of standard electronic and mechanical components. In our experience, by using standard components, the students obtain a deeper understanding of robotics hardware than would be possible with the use of (some) commercially available robot kits such as e.g. Boe-Bot or Lego Mindstorms. Furthermore, we propose a division between time spent on teaching the theoretical background and time spent on robot assembly and programming, which, in our view, provides the optimal balance between theory and practical work. Summarizing briefly, for a seven-week course, we propose two weeks of theoretical background lectures, followed by five weeks of practical work, in which each practical session starts with a brief theory demonstration.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 196
2008 - Research Article
Perry, B., Dalton, J., Edwards, M.
Views: 957       [302]
Abstract: Creating a sense of community in the online classroom is a challenge for educators who teach via the Internet. There is a growing body of literature supporting the importance of the community construct in online courses (Liu, Magjuka, Curtis, & Lee, 2007). Thus, educators are challenged to develop and implement innovative teaching technologies that help create virtual communities. The purpose of this exploratory research project was to document and analyze the students’ perceptions of an original interactive teaching technology called photovoice (PV) (Wang, & Burris, 1997). PV was trialed as a teaching strategy in a graduate course on change management. Following the completion of the course, qualitative data was collected from students regarding their experiences with PV. Three key themes emerged from the data: (a) support for course engagement, (b) enhancement of the learning environment, and (c) development of social connectedness. These findings are discussed within the context of an online learning community as described by Rovai (2002a) and the Community of Inquiry Model proposed by Garrison, Anderson, and Archer (2000). Finally, research questions that arise from this study are outlined.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 197
2011 - Research Article
Ramaekers, S., van Keulen, H., Kremer, W., Pilot, A., van Beukelen, P.
Views: 955       [1030]
Abstract: Case-based learning formats, in which relevant case information is provided just in time, require teachers to combine their scaffolding role with an information-providing one. The objective of this study is to establish how this combination of roles affects teacher behavior and that, in turn, mediates students’ reasoning and problem solving. Data on actual behaviors, intentions, effects and appreciation were collected using observations of case discussions, interviews, and a questionnaire in a mixed method, concurrent nested design. Cross-case analysis of the observed discussions revealed two patterns of combining the provision of information with scaffolding. Although students commonly responded to scaffolding interventions as intended, the results from the observations and the questionnaire showed that a pattern with a high level of concurrent scaffolding and provision of information should be avoided.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 198
Abstract: Colleges and universities recognize that one of the primary goals of higher education is to promote students’ ability to think critically. Using data from the Wabash National Study of Liberal Arts Education (WNS), this study examined the relationship between faculty teaching practices and the development of students’ critical thinking skills, specifically the differences between students’ self- report and the direct assessment (i.e., CAAP) of critical thinking. The results from multinomial logistic regression and OLS regression analyses showed that asking challenging questions increased both students’ self-reported and the directly measured critical thinking abilities. Interpreting abstract concepts as well as giving well-organized presentation increased students’ self-reported gains in critical thinking; however, these same practices did not significantly impact their CAAP scores. Inconsistent with previous literature, class presentations as well as group discussions decreased either students’ self-reported or directly assessed critical thinking abilities. These findings can guide faculty teaching practices to foster critical thinking for first-year college students.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 199
2011 - Research Article
Stull, J., Janse Varnum, S., Ducette, J., Schiller, J.
Views: 924       [851]
Abstract: In this research paper we consider formative assessment (FA) and discuss ways in which it has been implemented in four different university courses. We illustrate the different aspects of FA by deconstructing it and then demonstrating effectiveness in improving both teaching and student achievement. It appears that specifically “what is done” was less important since there were positive achievement gains in each study. While positive gains were realized with use of technology, gains were also realized with implementation of nontechnology dependent techniques. Further, gains were independent of class size or subject matter.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 200
2009 - Research Article
Cook, L., Rumrill, P., Tankersley, M.
Views: 917       [567]
Abstract: As a result of legal protections and the effects of inclusive reforms (e.g., improved academic skills, heightened expectations), more students with disabilities are entering higher education than ever before. The priorities and understanding of university faculty members directly shape the educational experiences and success of the rapidly growing group of college students with disabilities. Previous research in this area has focused primarily on faculty members’ knowledge of legal issues, general attitudes toward students with disabilities attending college, and willingness to make accommodations. This study expands the extant knowledge base by examining the priorities and understanding of 307 faculty members at an 8-campus university system regarding university students with disabilities in the following areas: Legal, Accommodations-Willingness, Accommodations-Policy, Universal Design for Instruction, Disability Characteristics, and Disability Etiquette. Participants’ ratings indicated that (a) accommodation policies and disability etiquette were viewed as highly important and were being addressed satisfactorily; (b) issues related to law, Universal Design for Instruction, and disability characteristics were important but were not being addressed satisfactorily; and (c) issues related to willingness to provide accommodations were neither highly important nor being addressed satisfactorily. Implications for faculty training are discussed.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 201
Abstract: The author (a university instructor) and her community partner (a public school teacher) have collaborated in teaching an academic service-learning course in special education. This collaboration, the RAP (recreational activities project), was completed by university undergraduate students and young adults with cognitive impairment and/or developmental disabilities. The author discusses the results of this six year project, and implications for both university students in teacher training programs and young adults with disabilities. This article analyzes the quality of social relationships of young adults with and without disabilities and discusses the benefits of a union between qualitative research methods and academic service-learning.

Send article to:

As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

Rank: 202
2010 - Research Article
Sperandio, J., Grudzinski-Hall, M., Stewart-Gambino, H.
Views: 909       [623]
Abstract: This article describes the development of an undergraduate interdisciplinary global citizenship program. The process of program development was guided by the core belief that students need not only information and skills, but the tools to develop their own individual citizenship in today’s world. Using document analysis, interviews with key informants and survey data from faculty involved in course development and delivery, the authors examine the challenges of construct definition, of establishing learning outcomes, and of program assessment that confronted the program developers. The article concludes with an exploration of the underlying assumption that university programs are effective means for building an engaged citizenry.

Send article to: