International Journal of Teaching and Learning in Higher Education
IJTLHE
International Journal of Teaching and Learning in Higher Education
IJTLHE
International Journal of Teaching and Learning in Higher Education
IJTLHE
International Journal of Teaching and Learning in Higher Education
IJTLHE
Article Collections

The International Journal of Teaching and Learning in Higher Education has published an extensive number of articles over the past 16 years. Based on these articles, a series of topic-based collections have been created.

10 Articles
Active Learning
8 Articles
Student Motivation
9 Articles
Lecture Pedagogy
9 Articles
Equity, Social Justice, & Inclusion

Student Motivation

2005 - Research Article
Mattern, R.
Views: 9113       [11]
Abstract: Theorists in the area of academic motivation have distinguished between mastery goals (develop understanding) and performance goals (demonstrate ability). Numerous research studies have empirically examined the implications these “constructs” have for understanding students’ performance in the classroom. Traditionally, mastery goals have been associated with adaptive learning outcomes while performance goals have been associated with maladaptive learning outcomes. Recently, however, theorists have suggested that students might hold both mastery and performance goals and that both goals can be beneficial. This study compared the achievement patterns of students who held both goals simultaneously to students who held either mastery or performance goals only. Data was collected within a foundational teacher education course from 143 students, a portion of whom were found to hold high mastery goals (mastery oriented), high performance-approach goals (performance-approach oriented), and high mastery and high performance goals (multiple goal orientation). Using course grades as an indicator of achievement, a one-way ANOVA showed no significant difference between the multiple goal group and the single goal groups. However, a significant difference was found between the high mastery group and the high performance group.

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Abstract: The present study was conducted to determine the effects of students’ perception of both teacher support and students’ reaction to questioning on the instrumental help-seeking strategy used by students. The researchers also examined the relationships between these three variables and the motivational components of achievement goal theory. A self-report questionnaire was administered to 1558 undergraduate university students, and structural equation modeling (SEM) was used to explore relations between the variables. Overall, the fit of the base model was reasonably good. Results indicate that perception of teacher reaction had a direct and positive effect on students’ instrumental help seeking, as well as indirect and positive effects on self-efficacy, and task value. Perception of teacher support had an indirect, positive effect on task value. Furthermore, results revealed that motivational components have important mediating effects on instrumental help- seeking.

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Abstract: The purpose of this article is to present a model of academic motivation that can be used by instructors to design courses that will engage students in learning. The model, based on research and theory, consists of five components that an instructor should consider when designing instruction: (1) empowerment, (2) usefulness, (3) success, (4) interest, and (5) caring. In this article, I describe the components of the model by discussing the key concepts of the components, summarizing the background research and theories that support the importance of the components, and providing questions, suggestions, and examples that instructors should consider when designing instruction. My hope is that novice, as well as experienced, instructors will find this model and the associated suggestions and examples useful as a reference tool to which they can refer when designing instruction.

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As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.


Abstract: Self-determination theory (SDT) underpins research on learner empowerment, but it is rarely discussed in empowerment-related literature. In addition, a motivational measure stemming from SDT has received little visibility in communication research. To address these concerns, this study focuses on motivational theory and measurement in an attempt to tease out the relationship between motivation and learner empowerment as well as how these constructs are related to students’ choicemaking opportunities in the classroom. In essence, this study aims to offer a strong synthesis of the literature related to these constructs, and also to make methodological and practical advancements in understanding student motivation, learner empowerment, and how freedom in the college classroom shapes students’ enthusiasm for learning.

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As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.


2011 - Instruction Article
Starcher, K., Proffitt, D.
Views: 1223       [1057]
Abstract: Reasons are examined as to why students are reluctant to complete assigned textbook readings on a timely basis. Prior research suggested that lack of student motivation, lack of student knowledge of effective study habits, competing demands on student time, and lack of congruency between student objectives for the course and professor objectives for students could be the cause. Our empirical research indicated that both the textbook and the professor can impact student willingness to complete assigned readings. Students (n=394) suggested that a good textbook be reasonably priced ($50 or less), concise (short chapters), loaded with great graphics, and easy to understand. Business faculty (n=77) shared ideas on how they encourage students to prepare for class by completing their assigned textbook reading. The authors divided the responses into one of two general categories: (1) requiring additional student preparation prior to class, or (2) incorporating in-class activities designed to measure the degree of student preparation. These responses were then categorized as reflections of professorial assumptions (Theory X or Theory Y) regarding their students. One author shared his success with the use of Thoughtful Intellectually Engaging Responses (TIERs) and Reading Logs. The authors conclude that an effective approach will require professors to develop course pedagogy that will attack multiple reasons for lack of preparation simultaneously so that we can reach all students who would otherwise remain unprepared. Suggestions on how to continue the dialog on this topic as well as suggestions for future research are provided.

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As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.


2015 - Research Article
Bondevik, G., Holst, L., Haugland, M., Bærheim, A., Raaheim, A.
Views: 434       [1954]
Abstract: Interprofessional education may be defined as an occasion when two or more professions learn with, from, and about each other in order to improve collaboration and quality of care. We studied the self-reported experiences from Norwegian health care students participating in interprofessional workplace learning in primary care. We discuss the results particularly in light of self-determination theory. During 2012, 24 students from eight different health educations at the University of Bergen and Bergen University College participated in interprofessional learning in primary care organized by the Center for Inter-professional Workplace Learning in Primary Care, Bergen. The students had their training in nursing homes and public health clinics, and they wrote reflective notes describing their learning experiences. The material was analyzed by systematic text condensation. The qualitative data analyses revealed five major areas of learning experiences from workplace practice: learning in an interprofessional setting, teamwork, relationships among the teamwork members, consequences for the patient, and consequences for the future. The results indicate that there is a high degree of learning potential in interprofessional workplace activity in primary care. This kind of learning strategy is an important supplement to traditional training within all health professions.

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As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.


Abstract: Promoting students’ self-regulated learning (SRL) is one way to improve postsecondary student success. However, few studies have investigated the instructional practices of postsecondary instructors that may support students’ SRL. This study sought to fill this gap. An undergraduate mathematics course was observed to determine instruction utilized in classrooms that could influence students’ SRL. Results showed that instructor references were made to four areas of SRL: (a) cognition; (b) motivation and affect; (c) behavior; and, (d) context. The majority of references concerned cognition and fewer messages addressed motivation. Findings are discussed in terms of postsecondary instructional practices that may foster students’ SRL. This project is significant because it developed an observation protocol to assess instructional practices that may support college students’ SRL in specific college courses: the Self-Regulated Learning Observation Protocol (SRLOP).

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As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.


2019 - Research Article
Mäenpää, K., Järvenoja, H., Peltonen, J., Pyhältö, K.
Views: 249       [3553]
Abstract: This longitudinal study explored the development of Finnish undergraduate nursing students’ motivation regulation profiles during two years in traditional and blended learning environments. Also, the association between the profiles and experienced study engagement, burnout and academic performance was investigated. The data were collected with a survey and included motivation regulation, study engagement, and burnout scales that were combined with students’ entrance examination scores, study credits, and grade point averages. Regardless of the learning environment, a majority (62.3%) of the students showed a sustainable, highly developed motivation regulation profile over time. They reported strong study engagement, higher academic performance, and reduced susceptibility to cynicism when compared to the students with less-developed motivation regulation profiles. However, individual reciprocal transitions between motivation regulation profiles over time were found with a group of students. As such, motivation regulation is changeable and influenced by situational components in learning. This aspect should be emphasized in developing professional higher education and teaching.

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As an open-source journal, IJTLHE makes articles freely available. This utility allows you to email the current article to anyone you wish. Simply enter their email address and click on Submit.

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